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  1. #1
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    2018 Evil Wreckoning Ride Review & Impressions Video

    Hello Everyone!

    I got a change to do a ride review on one of my bucket list bikes in the Evil Wreckoning. Man is this a DH monster. I could honestly see myself slapping a DH fork on this and just having it by my DH bike. It was that good. Anyways, check it out and let me know what you think. If you have a Wreckoning, let me know if my thoughts mirror yours or if you have any advice on set up to make climbing a little better. Considering this as my next bike.

    https://youtu.be/4IKaXwtuYMw

  2. #2
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    Lovely review. I acquired a Wrecker in May. It will descend comparable to a full blown DH rig, but is far more maneuverable. Regarding climbing, you really need to be on the right size model otherwise the seat post gets too far extended and puts you in poor pedaling position. For example, I'm 5'9" and ride a medium with a 35mm stem. Evil's mediums are like most other companies size large, but again if I was on small which was more in line with the numbers of my previous bike, I'd be too far over the back. Next, having a properly tuned shock is a must. The DELTA suspension can quickly overwhelm many shocks cause it to blow through it's travel. My friends run Cane Creek DB Airs and I had my Monarch tuned via Avalanche with their SSD mod. It rides great all around now and believe it or not is the fastest mountain bike I've owned both up and down.

    "Everything popular is wrong." -Oscar Wilde

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by HELLBELLY View Post
    Lovely review. I acquired a Wrecker in May. It will descend comparable to a full blown DH rig, but is far more maneuverable. Regarding climbing, you really need to be on the right size model otherwise the seat post gets too far extended and puts you in poor pedaling position. For example, I'm 5'9" and ride a medium with a 35mm stem. Evil's mediums are like most other companies size large, but again if I was on small which was more in line with the numbers of my previous bike, I'd be too far over the back. Next, having a properly tuned shock is a must. The DELTA suspension can quickly overwhelm many shocks cause it to blow through it's travel. My friends run Cane Creek DB Airs and I had my Monarch tuned via Avalanche with their SSD mod. It rides great all around now and believe it or not is the fastest mountain bike I've owned both up and down.

    A good shock is what I was thinking it would need as well. If I had more time to tune I'm betting I could get it to a better place. It still wasn't the worst bike ive climbed with but I'd be hesitant to do a long day with it.

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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by TamiJean View Post
    A good shock is what I was thinking it would need as well. If I had more time to tune I'm betting I could get it to a better place. It still wasn't the worst bike ive climbed with but I'd be hesitant to do a long day with it.

    Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk
    A couple of things to note. First, I have never liked Fox suspension. I am sure you can tinker with it as that particular one is similar to the DB Air, but I don't mess with them. Second, I have done everything from XC rides to bike park double black diamond runs to 8 hr crushers on the Wrecker and everything in between. It's ruled for all of it. Never leaving me wanting more or less bike.

    Lastly, I run mine in the X-Low position always. I do not think it makes any difference for climbing, but the bikes handling is way more fun with that geometry.

    "Everything popular is wrong." -Oscar Wilde

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by HELLBELLY View Post
    For example, I'm 5'9" and ride a medium with a 35mm stem. Evil's mediums are like most other companies size large, but again if I was on small which was more in line with the numbers of my previous bike, I'd be too far over the back.
    If you put the saddle rails in the same position in the dropper head than the same rider on either a small or medium Wreck will end up with the saddle in the same position relative to the rear axle of the bike. The only difference is the small frame will have 1.7" more of the dropper shaft exposed since the seat tube is shorter by that amount.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    If you put the saddle rails in the same position in the dropper head than the same rider on either a small or medium Wreck will end up with the saddle in the same position relative to the rear axle of the bike. The only difference is the small frame will have 1.7" more of the dropper shaft exposed since the seat tube is shorter by that amount.
    I'm not a mathematical genius by any stretch of the imagination, but due to the Wreck's seat tube angle the nose of the saddle will be positioned further back relative to the bar position on a small to equal that of a medium. I was not the only one who noticed this though.

    "Everything popular is wrong." -Oscar Wilde

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    Quote Originally Posted by HELLBELLY View Post
    I'm not a mathematical genius by any stretch of the imagination, but due to the Wreck's seat tube angle the nose of the saddle will be positioned further back relative to the bar position on a small to equal that of a medium. I was not the only one who noticed this though.

    I don't understand what you are saying above. Can you clarify what the bold text is meant to express?
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    I don't understand what you are saying above. Can you clarify what the bold text is meant to express?
    I will try and clarify. What is being said is that since most bikes have the same set tube angle and chainstay length, no matter what size bike you get, the position of the saddle over the rear of the bike will be the same no matter the size.

    I however will say there will be a variable. The smaller the bike the shorter the seat tube is so the length of seat post sticking out will generally be longer than on a bigger frame. Due to a seat post needing more extension relative to the frame size it is of my opinion that optimal pedaling positions on all frame sizes will have an affect of where the saddle hovers over the rear of the bike.

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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by TamiJean View Post
    I will try and clarify. What is being said is that since most bikes have the same set tube angle and chainstay length, no matter what size bike you get, the position of the saddle over the rear of the bike will be the same no matter the size.
    I agree with this. ^^^

    Quote Originally Posted by TamiJean View Post
    I however will say there will be a variable. The smaller the bike the shorter the seat tube is so the length of seat post sticking out will generally be longer than on a bigger frame. Due to a seat post needing more extension relative to the frame size it is of my opinion that optimal pedaling positions on all frame sizes will have an affect of where the saddle hovers over the rear of the bike.
    The initial unbolded text makes sense. I don't understand the bolded text above. Can you explain it further?
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by HELLBELLY View Post
    I'm not a mathematical genius by any stretch of the imagination, but due to the Wreck's seat tube angle the nose of the saddle will be positioned further back relative to the bar position on a small to equal that of a medium. I was not the only one who noticed this though.


    This doesn't make sense unless they change the chainstay or BB location. If people feel their weigh over the rear of the bike it's because the handle bars are close to the seat.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    I don't understand what you are saying above. Can you clarify what the bold text is meant to express?
    When you raise the seat on the Wreckoning it not only goes up, but also back. More so than most bikes. On a small I have more seat tube extension, the seat is further back and my climbing position is not as ideal. Bottom line, test ride one and make sure you get the correct size.
    "Everything popular is wrong." -Oscar Wilde

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    I agree with this. ^^^



    The initial unbolded text makes sense. I don't understand the bolded text above. Can you explain it further?

    Let me try it this way. Lets pretend on a large I can slam the seat post for ideal pedaling. then i go to a medium and the seatpost length changes 35mm shorter (35mm is the difference in length on all their frames). Since the Stay and the ST angle stay the same, we can assume that as long as i don't alter the seatpost height beyond the 35mm of natural shrinkage, the seat position over the rear should be relatively the same.

    However, obtaining ideal pedaling position could have other factors beyond just seat tube length. Lets say for whatever reason going down to a medium, i need to pull an additional 10mm of seat post of out the seat tube to get ideal pedaling position, I then move more rearward than on a large. Again this is hypothetical because i don't know the exact changes to the frames per size. Seat tube length is only one part of the story.

  13. #13
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    Smells like a troll.
    2018 Evil Wreckoning Ride Review & Impressions Video-troll.jpg
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by HELLBELLY View Post
    When you raise the seat on the Wreckoning it not only goes up, but also back. More so than most bikes. On a small I have more seat tube extension, the seat is further back and my climbing position is not as ideal.
    What you are saying doesn't make sense. For the same rider [ie. same leg length] the saddle will be in the same position on a small or medium frame.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    For the same rider [ie. same leg length] the saddle will be in the same position on a small or medium frame.
    For this to be untrue the small and medium would have to have different seat tube angles.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  16. #16
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    There could be other factors beyond just seat tube length in the frame design per size that will determine how a rider finds its ideal pedaling position. I am not claiming to know if that is true or not but its a possibility.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TamiJean View Post
    However, obtaining ideal pedaling position could have other factors beyond just seat tube length. Lets say for whatever reason going down to a medium, i need to pull an additional 10mm of seat post of out the seat tube to get ideal pedaling position, I then move more rearward than on a large. Again this is hypothetical because i don't know the exact changes to the frames per size. Seat tube length is only one part of the story.
    I think you are making the same erroneous assumption as Hellbelly in thinking that more dropper outside the seat tube makes the saddle move further rearward on the Wreck. It doesn't. If the distance between the BB and the top of the dropper is the same [which it will be for the same rider] than the saddle is in the same position relative to the BB and the rear axle regardless of what size Wreck you are on.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by TamiJean View Post
    There could be other factors beyond just seat tube length in the frame design per size that will determine how a rider finds its ideal pedaling position. I am not claiming to know if that is true or not but its a possibility.
    Definitely but that's not what you or Hellbelly just said in the last few posts. That's why I asked for clarification just to be sure I understood what you were trying to say.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    I think you are making the same erroneous assumption as Hellbelly in thinking that more dropper outside the seat tube makes the saddle move further rearward on the Wreck. It doesn't. If the distance between the BB and the top of the dropper is the same [which it will be for the same rider] than the saddle is in the same position relative to the BB and the rear axle regardless of what size Wreck you are on.
    I agree with you 100%. All I am saying is that for whatever reason if you had to alter that length to achieve ideal pedaling position, then that would cause a change. Maybe that never happens I don't know.

  20. #20
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    One such example I can think of that could change where you place the saddle, is going up or down and size will have an impact to the length of the cockpit. So going bigger or smaller could impact where you clamp the post to the saddle changing where it sits over the rear of the bike.

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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    I think you are making the same erroneous assumption as Hellbelly in thinking that more dropper outside the seat tube makes the saddle move further rearward on the Wreck. It doesn't. If the distance between the BB and the top of the dropper is the same [which it will be for the same rider] than the saddle is in the same position relative to the BB and the rear axle regardless of what size Wreck you are on.
    I'm 6'6" I demo'd a Evil XL Calling.. not a wreck.

    Slack seat angles put my ass way over the back wheel. not hard to understand..and they are no fun to pedal like that. If I was shorter the seat would not be so far over the back. The steeper the seat angle the less pronounced this issue becomes. Anyway I removed Evil, Trek and Santa Cruz from my searching because their seat angles are way too slack.

    2018 Evil Wreckoning Ride Review & Impressions Video-adfnfykh.jpg
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by KTMDirtFace View Post
    I'm 6'6" I demo'd a Evil XL Calling.. not a wreck.

    Slack seat angles put my ass way over the back wheel. not hard to understand..and they are no fun to pedal like that. If I was shorter the seat would not be so far over the back. The steeper the seat angle the less pronounced this issue becomes. Anyway I removed Evil, Trek and Santa Cruz from my searching because their seat angles are way too slack.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I subscribe to the hightower LT forum and there are a few taller riders riding the XXL LT with some satisfaction. You might check out the new Transition smuggler or sentinal

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    Quote Originally Posted by TamiJean View Post
    I subscribe to the hightower LT forum and there are a few taller riders riding the XXL LT with some satisfaction. You might check out the new Transition smuggler or sentinal

    Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk
    Yea there is a guy on there that is 6'8" but he complained about the seat angle too.

    Also Ben Cathro ( pro dowhill racer on youtube ) just built one up and he is 6'7" and also complained about the seat angle.

    Sentinel was on my list but I have a GG Smash on the way. GG bikes fit me great.
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    I think this is what Hellbelly is refering to. Please correct me if it's wrong, but I think he's right that a medium with the seat raised way up will be farther back than a large with it raised less out of the top tube since the Effective Seat Angle is measured at stack height. None of the dimensions in the drawing are correct, just made for illustration purposes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by smithcreek View Post
    I think this is what Hellbelly is refering to. Please correct me if it's wrong, but I think he's right that a medium with the seat raised way up will be farther back than a large with it raised less out of the top tube since the Effective Seat Angle is measured at stack height.
    Sorry, but that is wrong. That would require each frame to have a different actual seat tube angle. They don't. They are identical except for the length of the seat tube.

    There should only be one red line in your diagram above and every frame size will be a point on that one line.
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  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    Sorry, but that is wrong. That would require each frame to have a different actual seat tube angle. They don't. They are identical except for the length of the seat tube.

    There should only be one red line in your diagram above and every frame size will be a point on that one line.
    The red lines demonstrate (exaggerated) what the actual seat tube angles would need to be to get the same effective STA at different stack heights. To truly get the exact same effective seat tube angle at two different stack heights there has to be a difference in in the angle or placement of the seat tube. I'm guessing you are right though, and the frames are the same but the geo numbers given are fudged a hair. I did a quick drawing using the numbers off Evil's website and if the medium was exactly 74.8 degrees at 25.1" stack height. and the large was exactly 74.8 degrees at 25.5", then moving the medium seat up to the large stack height would push it back 2.5mm.

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    Quote Originally Posted by smithcreek View Post
    I'm guessing you are right though, and the frames are the same but the geo numbers given are fudged a hair.
    Yup. They just fudge the STA number in the geo chart. But, like you note the actual differences aren't huge. By keeping the frames standardized from the BB/seat tube backwards makes design/production a lot easier/cheaper.

    None of this makes it any less critical to get the right size frame for your body, your trails and your riding style, but it not because swapping between two sizes changes the saddle position for a particular rider.
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    Yup. They just fudge the STA number in the geo chart. But, like you note the actual differences aren't huge. By keeping the frames standardized from the BB/seat tube backwards makes design/production a lot easier/cheaper.

    None of this makes it any less critical to get the right size frame for your body, your trails and your riding style, but it not because swapping between two sizes changes the saddle position for a particular rider.
    With a seat tube angle that slack, so a lot of weight is already close to tbe rear wheel. If you're on a size smaller than you should be than the bars with be closer to the saddle and shift even more weight back, probably making it feel you're further back. So seat angle and size are an issue with this bike, but not in the way people think.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cerberus75 View Post
    With a seat tube angle that slack, so a lot of weight is already close to tbe rear wheel. If you're on a size smaller than you should be than the bars with be closer to the saddle and shift even more weight back, probably making it feel you're further back. So seat angle and size are an issue with this bike, but not in the way people think.
    That makes sense for sure.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
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