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  1. #1
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    Recent Lost Lake ride in Seward: first single track ride in Alaska, my experience

    Hi all,

    So this was my first single track ride in Alaska (also my first time to Alaska!.)

    I rented a 29'er from the Ship Wreck, nice staff by the way, and they directed me to the trails.

    I had a tough time with the uphill since it was very rocky. How do you ride up with so many loose rocks? I almost made it to the top but ran out of time and had to return the bike.

    The downhill was great until I scraped my knee with a rock, but it was fun anyway!

    I am wondering if trail work is allowed in Alaska? I felt that the trail could use some work to make it more rideable (too many loose rocks and roots), unless my riding skills suck!..lol.

    I felt the terrain to be tougher than what I am used to in NorCal.

    I strapped a bear bell to my bike and also yelled at every corner just in case. Didn't come across any bears.

    As everywhere else in Alaska, the landscape surrounding the trails was epic - truly beautiful. The mountains alone are amazing! I was happy to get a ride in!

    One thing I noticed is that most riders, ride hard tails instead of Full Suspension, Why? I would think most local riders would opt for full.

    I look forward to reading your comments on my rookie Alaskan ride!

    Have a great day!

  2. #2
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    ALASKANS are hardy people...they could care less about loose rocks and roots and they are only able to ride a few months out of the year. It would be hard to maintain the trails like we do down here in the 48. This is the very reason I return every year to ride in Alaska....this year is Kenai Peninsula!!

  3. #3
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    Well, to be honest, many of us Alaskans ride year round, regardless of the weather. We're hardy people afterall...

    I agree though that most riders around here don't care so much about loose rocks and roots. You learn to ride those as features. That said, Anchorage has some amazing, and amazingly well maintained singletrack that is much more likely what you are used to in the outside. Though, due to permafrost and the shallow root systems of most of the trees around here, even the best trails are apt to have a root poke through from time to time.

    I can't say that I've noticed more HT than full squish bikes around here. I used to ride FS, but have switched over to riding my Pugsley full time, trails, road, snow, sand, gravel - everything and every day. If there is a higher incidence of HTs here, I'd say it is due to the fact that an HT is a touch easier to maintain and fewer issues can arise on the trails. It is possible and easy to ride in areas that take you quite far from civilization and it'd suck to have a failure in some of those places. Though I could just be talking out my arse. Retro-grouchiness, maybe? Someone jump in here.

  4. #4
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    what other trails do you ride in that area and where can you find info or trail maps???

  5. #5
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    Hmmm...I'm not the best one to answer that for you as I've not ridden on the peninsula much. However, for the Anchorage single track maps, go here: Singletrack Advocates

  6. #6
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    Were you the kid in blue on the black Specialized 29r? If so you stopped and talked for a minute at the Seward side trailhead. You'll get better at riding with the loose rocks and roots just takes practice, hell I rode the whole thing on a rigid bike that same day and I'm a hack.

  7. #7
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    You have to realize that trails like the Lost Lake trail are more of a hiking trail than a mountain bike trail, thus trying to make it a bike specific trail isn't necessarily the goal or desire. Typically, at least up here, there isn't a lot of support for "trail work" when that "trail work" is meant specifically to remove challenging terrain. It is more of a situation where riders should learn to ride it as-is. There are a lot of other trails out there to ride with all sorts of terrain. We don't need to go changing one specific trail because it might be more difficult to clean when there are plenty of other trails that already have easier terrain available.

  8. #8
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    There are quite a few similar trails on the peninsula. In an effort to keep it short, let me point you to the website of an upcoming race--there's a map and a cue sheet on the home page which will give you directions to some trail heads.

    Kenai250.wordpress.com

  9. #9
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    Roots rocks and hell are the best type of trail. Wouldn't it be rad if they/we/whoever it would be, could build trail loops through the front range that are rideable. Keeping in mind it doesn't have to be rideable for all the hacks new to riding, but rideable enough that they could learn someday. Like, for example, williwaw lakes valley over the saddle to long lake and out to the dome trail. A trail like that would have people flying here specifically to ride it. I could get behind an effort like that.
    "Having lack of self-preservation makes biking more fun."

  10. #10
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    You would have to get a trail idea like that into the master plan and that will take until the end of time to accomplish. Its like the Rabbit Lakes trail. People have been riding it for years and in the draft master plan it is being considered for biking, but in the mean time last year the park got around to putting up "no bikes" signage when the trailhead was upgraded. The right hand has no idea what the left hand is doing. I agree though, killer alpine loops in the front range would be beyond wonderful. If Noway can do it in a similar climate we can do it and should, someone just needs to get the state parks to embrace bike trails, and trail building more. In the meantime I see they are willing to blow huge wads on trail head rehab but spend little on trail improvement/expansion.

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