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  1. #1
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    Reputation: ionsmuse's Avatar
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    Endo v. Gazz (on Marge)

    As a matter of curiosity, Tshz. et al, who much float is gained with the larger tire? When using very low pressures, do aggressive knobs make much difference?

  2. #2
    No, that's not phonetic
    Reputation: tscheezy's Avatar
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    I just gave the Gazzi a hair cut, as I think the very tall knobs not only create noticeably more rolling resistance, but they also tended to break up frozen snow surfaces more and created a layer of ground-up sugar snow the tire then spun out on. The Endos don't disturb the surface as much, and so tend to find a little more traction in those specific conditions. In warmer, softer snow, we may end up missing the tall Gazzi knobs, but there is still more tread on the buzzed Nokian than on a new Endo. There have been snow conditions in the past where I swappped my rear Endo for the full-knob Gazzi to gain some traction in warmer snow.

    Anyway, the tread width on the Nokian is noticeably narrower than on the Endo. At very low pressures, the part of the tire that has knobs on the ground is less on the Nokian. When the contact patch is flattened to full knob width, the Nokian's knobby area is about 75mm wide while the Endo's is close to 100mm. That's a full inch difference. The overall traction is not adversely impacted though, since that center knob area is still a lot more agressive on the Nokian. The knobs on the Gazzi do have to break through the snow surface for the casing outside the tread area to contribute to floatation though. That's where the Endo provides better float without pulverizing the snow it's passing over.

    The overall casing widths (not squished) are about 80 and 90mm for the Gazzi and Endo, respectively. Not that different, actually. The Endo is a noticeably taller tire overall. The casing height is probably a good half inch taller. It is more round and less flattened out than the Nokian on the Large Marge rims. The flotation is probably similar with the edge obviously going to the Endo.
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  3. #3
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    Endo

    I've used both and for me there's no question: Endo!
    The Endo feels pounds lighter than the 3.0 Gazz, has better traction in most cases because there's more rubber on the ground than the aggressive knobby, has considerably more float, and just rides better. That's my experience in Alaska anyway. I'm now on the Arctic Ocean in Barrow and my feelings haven't changed.
    Others may feel differently, but everyone I know who can use Endos, do! Many are like me in that they wouldn't goto the big fatties when the Gazz. was the only game in town, but the Endos have changed all of that.
    Also, for anyone who cares, I'm riding the new Pugs fork that uses a front hub instead of the rear hub fork, and I must say that it rides "like a fork"!. All the rack braze-ons you'll ever need, black, and designed specifically for Pugs. They should be out later this spring....just in time for us not to need them anymore.
    Hope everyone is well,
    Pat

  4. #4
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    how to trim knobbies?

    What have you found to be the best/fastest way to trim excess tread? Belt sander, knife? Thanks

  5. #5
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    new pugs fork weight?

    Have fun up there. How does the new narrow pugs fork compare in weight to the old wide one? Thanks

  6. #6
    Caveman
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    Pat,
    are you still using an offset dish front wheel?

  7. #7
    No, that's not phonetic
    Reputation: tscheezy's Avatar
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    I used a pair of dykes. No, not a lesbo twosome. Wirecutters. Sharp tin snips actually work even better if you can get down there flush with the knob. I cut them roughly to half-height.
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  8. #8
    Mr.Secret
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    Sidecutters WILL let you cut the knobs to the casing easily. I'm getting ready to get "creative" on a 2.7 Timberwolf.....

  9. #9
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    Timberwolf haircut

    Let us know how it goes. Shear time and weight loss. Thanks.

  10. #10
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    As far as weight goes, I doubt there is much difference. The funky one isn't really that chunky as far as regular steel forks go.
    ~1200g. I weighed one against a Desalvo/ Wildfire and they were basically the same. I think the Wildfire looks better. I don't know if there are any differences in the way they feel.
    I think the Bontrager carbon may be the way to go for a lighter, regular spacing fork that is priced OK.
    Not much clearance and who knows if those fork legs will stay glued in the crown at 30 bellow.

  11. #11
    Fatback
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    lighter yet

    The fork John Evingson made for me is 55 grams lighter than the Bontrager carbon. You are basically talking 2#s. The Bontrager handled too quickly for my tastes, though I'm in a very upright position which doesn't help. He would be glad to make one for you. Send me a PM and I'll give you his #.

  12. #12
    Mr.Secret
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    Quote Originally Posted by dhart
    What have you found to be the best/fastest way to trim excess tread? Belt sander, knife? Thanks
    This is what I use to cut knobs, an old pair of Klein sidecutters.They've also cut alot of # 9 hanger wire on suspended grid/drywall ceilings as you can see.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by R.T.R.
    This is what I use to cut knobs, an old pair of Klein sidecutters.

    One of the best tools ever made.

  14. #14
    Bill M
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    End Nippers

    Quote Originally Posted by R.T.R.
    This is what I use to cut knobs, an old pair of Klein sidecutters.They've also cut alot of # 9 hanger wire on suspended grid/drywall ceilings as you can see.
    End Nippers are easier to make a flat cut with at least for me. No pics but I think carpenters call them nail nippers.

  15. #15
    Mr.Secret
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill M
    End Nippers are easier to make a flat cut with at least for me. No pics but I think carpenters call them nail nippers.
    Us old carpenters call 'em dykes or bullnoses'. I've got some of those also for tieing the wire on drywall ceilings. For me though it's easier to manipulate the sidecutters when cutting tires.

  16. #16
    Mr.Secret
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    Quote Originally Posted by R.T.R.
    Us old carpenters call 'em dykes or bullnoses'. I've got some of those also for tieing the wire on drywall ceilings. For me though it's easier to manipulate the sidecutters when cutting tires.
    Bill, are dees dem ?
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  17. #17
    Bill M
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    Quote Originally Posted by R.T.R.
    Bill, are dees dem ?
    Dat's Dem

  18. #18
    Caveman
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    Wow, A thread with both fat tires and man-tools

    heaven

  19. #19
    Mr.Secret
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    Not only man-tools but DRYWALL tools..................

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