View Poll Results: Will Bike Lanes Improve, Deteriorate, or have no impact on Bike Riding in Anchorage?

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  • Yes!

    8 80.00%
  • No!

    0 0%
  • Will have no impact whatsoever.

    2 20.00%
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Thread: Bike Lanes

  1. #1
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    Bike Lanes

    The UAA Bike Club seems fairly split on bike lanes Im Asking why the answer you choose better or worse no difference why?

  2. #2
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    I feel Bike Lanes Improve cyclists visibility to motorists and gives the rider more confidence in cycling the question now is what design of bike lanes and getting the plowing issues straightened out.

  3. #3
    Beware of Doggerel
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    I'm on the fence here

    It seems like a good idea but I'm not sold. I ride into work along lake otis, or as I like to call it the "lake otis death race". All the road crossings on that route get a little scary. But its not too bad. In the winter I really like the safety of being off to the side with a median between me and the road. Its a compromise either you are in the road and able to be seen a little better, but also able to be slid into and bullied out of your lane by joe and jane retard in a hummer, or you are safe from being run down but less able to be seen from cross traffic. I like it the way it is.

    Also it cuts down on the noise. Riding in an acutal bikelane just feels too close to the cars sometimes. Neither option is really a great fit and I prefer the compromises as they currently exist.


    Adam
    I wanna say I'm sorry for stuff I haven't done yet, things will shortly get completely out of hand --T.M.G.

  4. #4
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    all very interesting I too feel sometimes you get to close to the edge between mentally challenged drivers and I feel the safest road riding is done at night heck you can just about do freestyle at night. but as to lane wideness thats exactly the thought that snowballed into bike lanes such well Im going on L. Otis today but Tudor has quite a bit of snow on the side and its kind of a waste of space isn't it? when theres enough space for my bike to ride in the middle of the left over snow... And yes by my house there are bike lanes and people do cut into my lane but I notified APD about that and now a few times a week a police officer stays in the school area watching for speeders and bike lane violators
    which by the way I think the fines at 200 dollars I think a 200 dollar ticket among other things is a pretty good deterant well see you later headed out to L. Otis and trails Remember Bikes are simply more effecient than any other vehicle later

  5. #5
    Caveman
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    I dont think Anchorage is ready for bike lanes in the streets. I'm thinking of where I've spent a bunch of time in front range colorado where motorists see hundreds of cyclists a day. Putting bike lanes in Mid-town would still be scary. I do like the big seperated side walk design, like C street has south of 36th. There simply arent enough winter cyclists on the roads to attain that constant awareness needed to make it safe. Summer time might be fine but in general people dont care about bikers on the roads in this town.

    My expensive vote would be more seperated pathways, so with the lack of right of way we are pretty much screwed..

    When I venture into mid-town I bring more lights and put my afro-defensive-high-twitch game face on..

  6. #6
    Beware of Doggerel
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    Separate but equal

    I agree that is the best choice. Of course it means we have to be careful at intersections.

    elgeneralsv:

    I'm with you on the night thing. Its amazing how this town shuts down. I rode home at around 2:30 am one day this week and there was no one out there but cops. I've never obeyed so many red lights in my life. I do a fair amount of late nights and it always amazes me how pleasant it is to cruise around the Anchorage Streets at odd hours.

    In a perfect pie in the sky world, when I get to be King of Anchorage, cars would be limited to using the roads only during certain hours, with exceptions made for the handicapped. Everyone else would bike.

    Brij just wrote a letter to the editor in the ADN last week commenting on how nice it is to commute around Anchorage by bike. I thought that was great. Much better than my angry "drivers are retards" comment above (although I stand by the comment, its just too easy to take potshots and too much of that stuff makes bikers sound like a bunch of winers). Besides the comment is unfair to retards. We shouldn't forget that biking in this town for transportation is actually pretty good. Nothing's perfect, but it ain't all bad. During rush hour I take great pleasure in whatching that "...line of cars go down real slow..." as Radar Love bounces around in my head not the good 'ol Diamond Earing version (which was a little before my time) but the 80's version by White Lion.

    Adam
    I wanna say I'm sorry for stuff I haven't done yet, things will shortly get completely out of hand --T.M.G.

  7. #7
    Caveman
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    Thanks Adam,

    Full Text of Senor Potnis:

    City is doing its part to make biking year-round comfortable and safe


    I commute by bike year-round, and have noticed that this and the last couple of winters the city has been doing a great job keeping the sidewalks and bike paths fairly well clear of snow. Most of my routes encompass the Midtown and downtown areas, so I cannot comment on other parts of the city.

    There are the familiar faces that I see every day, on the trails and along roads, on their bicycles, but I always wonder why more people don't take advantage of all the effort the city is making to help commuting be a pleasant experience. Since I started biking everywhere, every day, I have forgotten the concept of rush hour. There is no scraping ice in the mornings or plugging in at night. My blood pressure has come down to 98/74. The last time I filled my car with gas was in July.

    I just want to thank the city, to let them know that it is appreciated.

    One request to the media, in general, would be to include more public service announcements to educate and inform motorists and cyclists how to peacefully co-exist. There are some simple guidelines that, when followed, will make all our lives safer and healthier.

    Cycling is fun. Try it.

    ---- Brij Potnis

  8. #8
    Diaskeuast
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    First of all, I echo the thanks to the city for better snow removal. My winter commuting route has been much better the past two years because of quick responses by the small plows that clear bike paths.

    As for the bike lane vs. separate path question, I enjoy the separated paths for their added safety and reduced noise, and I think we should have as many of them as possible. But where they aren't feasible because of limited right of way, bike lanes on the road surface are still a great way to go. When they are of sufficient size and well marked, they make riding on the streets safer and send a message to motorists that bikes are a legitimate form of transportation.

    I've read stories in the past by people critical of bike lanes because they feel a designated lane marginalizes bicycles. They argue that bikes belong in the same lanes as cars and that cyclists should ride there to stake their claim to that part of the road. Not only is that impractical in winter conditions, but it overlooks the fact that not all cyclists are serious riders with lots of experience and a high comfort level in close proximity to Escalades and Suburbans. Some are kids, older folks or simply casual riders who venture out infrequently. Those people deserve the safety of a marked section of the road.
    Enjoying the meaningful pursuit of meaningless fun.

  9. #9
    Beware of Doggerel
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    Tim:

    I'm with ya man. Bikes certainly do have as much right to the road as cars and we need car drivers to know that. But bikes move at a different speed (duh). For example in downtown traffic I am have been stuck behind cars and I think most bikes are faster in stop and go traffic. Once speeds get over 10-15 mph all bets are off of course. But in the 0-20mph range it seems that most bikes can get up to speed and slow down much faster than a car. In mixed environments with close/lights and traffic and sections of open road (ie lake otis at rush hour) bikes and cars will yo-yo constantly. So we can't really share the road comfortably. We need our own space so we don't get stuck in the car traffic, and so they can get by us safely when they are moving along.

    Adam
    I wanna say I'm sorry for stuff I haven't done yet, things will shortly get completely out of hand --T.M.G.

  10. #10
    Wood chips are stupid
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    lubed

    I want bike racks in front of strip clubs. Oh yea, and more singletrack!


    akdeluxe
    "Trust me,you don't want a big baby."

    JT

  11. #11
    What Penguin???
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    Yeah! More Singletrack!

    I had no idea this dialog was going on. Good stuff, guys!

    The bicycling ordinance was changed a year ago (see attached). For example, you no longer have to stop at each and every intersection when you're on a bike (or side) path. Technically before, you had to stop at every driveway, parking lot or side road. You still have to have a bell on your bike (huh?). You still cannot ride on a sidewalk in a business district (funny, though, I called APD and asked what constitutes a business district and they couldn't tell me). You CAN take a lane to ride straight through an intersection without dangerously staying far to the right in a right-hand-only turn lane to defy 1-ton pickups legally turning right when you want to go straight. You can now legally enter a left hand turn lane to turn left (before, law-abiding cyclists were forced to use pedestrian cross-walks to turn left). One hitch to this cross-walk business is that when you are in a signal-controled cross-walk, APD expects you to dismount and walk. According to APD's interpretation, you could be ticketed for riding your bike in a cross-walk (right, You-Know-Who?) Of course, don't assume that police officers are knowledgeable about bike law at all--during last year's Bike to Work week, a commuter was stopped twice by the same officer and told to get off the street and ride on the sidewalk next to the road.

    As for bike lanes, it's sort of a chicken-or-the-egg thing--until more cyclists get out on the road, how will motorists become used to them being out on the road? Maybe one way is to create bike lanes to encourage cyclists to use them and take advantage of the law giving cyclists the same rights to the road as motor vehicles? On the other hand, you wouldn't catch me riding a bike lane in the middle of winter! Yikes!

    I agree with AK Deluxe. MORE SINGLETRACK! Speaking of singletrack, I'd like to put in an 8-10 mile loopy trail system on the hillside. Anyone with me? STA Tuned!!!

    QB
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    Meanwhile, back at the hive....

  12. #12
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    single track I have heard that often but when I think of single track it seems to differ than what a single track really is what is a single track and sorry for some reason thought this was closed but one thing I noticed is you can move along fairly quickly on the chester trail sort of the bike express way of Anchorage I do try to get out and ride but with out the need to ride to UAA I only need to ride my bike a few blocks to the store but if I had to ride longer distances I would be all for a good bike lane design... as to APD yes I have been stopped for riding in a bike lane also got stopped by a trail watch person telling me the sidewalk was safer about a minute on the sidewalk I was back on the bike lane cruising around 18KM if someone were to ask preference I would say bike lanes connecting to the trails like a lane on N. Lights that would merge bikes into the chester creek trail or something like that the good thing about the suburbans and hummers is you can hear them miles away and get a fair chance to move out of the way well happy ney year hope bike conditions improve for the better and safe riding all (although not sure bike racks at a strip joint will do much for that AKDeluxe)

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