• 02-23-2013
    getagrip
    Where to cut steerer tube on new fork...Guardian
    Just got my new fork in today. The old fork was 80mm travel, and the new one is 100mm. Would it be advisable to cut the new steerer tube the same length as the old, or would it be better to cut it down by one or two spacers? For the record, because I'm getting older, I'd take comfort over aggression, but ideally, I'd like the best of both worlds. I'll also be switching to this handlebar below, which has an 18mm rise:

    Nashbar CF-250 Carbon Riser Bars - Mountain Handlebars
  • 02-23-2013
    KrazyKreitzer
    Where to cut steerer tube on new fork...Guardian
    I just did this on my Goblin. I cut it the same and when I get out and ride it and say I want to try it lower I can move the spacers to lower the stem. If I like that I can cut the steerer. But this way I at least have options.
  • 02-24-2013
    tuskenraider
    I think the tube is pretty long at stock length, so even if you cut it down 1/2" shorter than stock, you'll still have plenty of adjustment options.
  • 02-24-2013
    trailville
    Always leave room for spacers. If you don't like them below the stem, you can move them above the stem.
    Plus it provides more flexibility should you want to move the fork to another frame.
  • 02-24-2013
    getagrip
    Thanks for the replies. I ended up cutting the steerer tube of the new fork the same length as the original. As stated above, better to be safe than sorry, but also as stated above, it probably would have been fine if I cut off another half inch. I kind of like the upright feel anyway, so should be kinder on my back, especially with the rise of the new handlebars. Thanks again for the feedback!
  • 02-25-2013
    BigDaddyFlyer
    I think that was a smart move.

    If you look at photos I post on here of my personal bikes, even though I have an aggressive position on the bike with the stem slammed, there are always 15-20mm of spacers on top of the stem. I do this for 3 reasons:

    1. I tend to roll equipment over often so keeping it a little longer doesn't narrow the field of potential purchasers.
    2. If I want to switch the fork over to another one of my bikes the height of HT's does vary by model on occasion so no need to worry about a fork being too short.
    3. Heaven forbid, if something were to happen to me like tweaking my back or another injury that would cause me to need to raise my bar position, even temporarily, I have the ablity to do so.

    Post up pics!

    Jeremy
  • 02-25-2013
    getagrip
    I will definitely post photos of the upgrades! Right now one of the bolts is stuck in the rotor. Seems to happen almost every time I've changed out rotors, not to mention the flesh wound that seems to go with it when your hand gets sliced by the rotor! The plan is to go to Home Depot after work and pick up a Pro Grabit to get the bloody stripped screw out!
  • 02-25-2013
    BigDaddyFlyer
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by getagrip View Post
    I will definitely post photos of the upgrades! Right now one of the bolts is stuck in the rotor. Seems to happen almost every time I've changed out rotors, not to mention the flesh wound that seems to go with it when your hand gets sliced by the rotor! The plan is to go to Home Depot after work and pick up a Pro Grabit to get the bloody stripped screw out!

    Bummer! Sometimes I've had luck with a stripped rotor bolt by taking a dremel tool with a carbide cutter blade and cutting a slit in it, effectively making it a flathead screwedriver screw, then using a screwdriver to get it out. Of course if it is totally seized in there that doesn't help too much either...

    Good luck!

    Jeremy