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  1. #1
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    when to bleed brakes / replace fluid?

    I was wondering how often we have to replace the brake fluids? Is any standard oil okay?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by swl7 View Post
    I was wondering how often we have to replace the brake fluids? Is any standard oil okay?
    This is my first experience with disc brakes on the Goblin, but I would have to assume that you should not have to bleed your brakes or change your fluid for quite some time.
    How often do you bleed\change the fluid on your car?

    Unless you somehow introduce air into the system or they were not setup correctly from the beginning. I think you would probably wear out many sets of pads before you have to worry about the fluid.

    (Obviously someone with more experience will correct me if I am wrong)

    In automobiles that see heavy track usage, it is common to change fluid often. This is due to the the fluid heating up to high temps and then cooling and then heating up again. Not something I think you need to worry about on a bike.

  3. #3
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    thanks for the reply. It was just something on my mind as I was cleaning my brake rotors and pads today.

    I was going to go out for a ride, but when I pressed the rear brakes, it sounded like a horse was slowly dying from a gunshot wound. I took it to the LBS, but instead of charging me to clean it, they just told me to basically clean my pads with rubbing alcohol.

    Long story short, I didn't ride today, but got all that black gunk out of my brake pads. it was terrible, I have no idea how they got so dirty, but now it's a lot better.

  4. #4
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    My previous bike was entry level and had fairly low end hydraulic disc brakes. I never had any trouble with them that required bleeding or replacing oil.

    My current bike has Elixir 3 brakes and I have had a little trouble with them getting squishy. They have been bled/tuned at an LBS a couple of times for about $20 each time.

    Each time the braking improved and I felt it was money well spent.

    I can do most maintenance on my bike myself. But I will likely always leave something significant like bleeding brakes to pros.

  5. #5
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    Bleeding brakes is fairly easy to do if you just take the time to do it right. You need to bleed your brakes depending on use and feel. I had Marta's that I bled once in 3 years. I have formula RX now and have. Led them once already because my levers felt squishy. Well see how long it last. If your fluid looks discolored I would change it. Fluid is rather cheap for dot fluid it's like 3 bucks at autozone. Many bleeds with one little can. What type of brakes does your bike have?

  6. #6
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    my bike has the tektro auriga comps.

    i realized another issue, not with the brakes itself, but the brake pads. I cleaned up the rear rotor and brake pads, but I am still seeing the issue with the squeaky noise. I feel like my brake pads are too contaminated.

    If you go through this link, Disc Brake Noise - YouTube you can see pretty much what I did. I feel like rather than the rotor, the brake pads are the issue.

    Any ideas before I go ahead and purchase the pads? Edit: know anywhere where I can purchase these brake pads or if Airborne would be willing to send me a pair for my rear brakes? I know BigDaddy is out for the week for his vacation, but maybe I can wait until then

  7. #7
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    A couple of things real quick (I'm at work)...

    Do not clean your rotors and/or pads all super clean.
    You should only wipe them down if you do have visible dirt on them or you think the rotor wound up with something like lube on it.
    If your pads get contaminated with oil/lube, replace them. You cannot clean contamination off the pads.

    The pads deposit onto the rotors. It's part of the process and as far as I know every company makes it that way. You don't want to clean all that off your rotors.

    The other thing that came to mind reading this thread...

    If you have:
    - removed your wheel from the frame
    - knocked your brakes against something (a rock, root, curb...)

    Then perhaps your noise is coming from a misaligned rotor/wheel combination.
    Or if you bent your rotor, you may get noise also.

    Loosen and re-tighten your wheel. Make sure it is straight in the fork/swingarm
    hoist the wheel off the ground and give it a spin.
    Listen closely to see if you can hear the rotor rub. If you do, try to identify when/where on the rotor it does this.
    Loosen the brake, go through the steps in tightening it back down (pulling the brake lever to hold it against the rotor while you tighten the two bolts).

    If this doesn't help come back... or maybe someone has more time to answer you.
    Hope this helps

    eta: Forgot to answer part of your question...

    Replace pads when they are worn. Look at them new, you should be able to tell when they get so far down your retaining spring is getting ruined, or there is no more pad on the backing plate... but then, that's too far.

    Bleeding brakes should be done according to the manufacturer's recommendation. You can bleed more often if you think it needs it. Use the correct fluid... there is SPECIFIC fluid to use depending on the brakes you have... be sure to use it... DO NOT SUBSTITUTE!
    I'm not talking brand, but type of brake fluid, rating...

  8. #8
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    i went ahead and purchased new brake pads. my pads are definitely contaminated. Amazon.com: Disc Pads Tektro E10.11 Hydro Auriga/draco/aquila: Sports & Outdoors

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by swl7 View Post
    i went ahead and purchased new brake pads. my pads are definitely contaminated. Amazon.com: Disc Pads Tektro E10.11 Hydro Auriga/draco/aquila: Sports & Outdoors
    FWIW, you can just look for Shimano M525 Deore pads which are the same size and shape. Lots of pad manufacturers make them.

  10. #10
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    A few notes:

    You only need to bleed your brakes if they feel squishy

    Most brakes use mineral oil anymore. To save money, you can use baby oil, its the same thing. Do not use Mineral oil from a drug store(its too thick) or DOT fluid in brakes that use mineral oil, it will ruin then.

    If oil gets on your pads, You can bake them in an oven/toaster oven for 20 minutes at 450 degrees and it burns the oil off. It may stink a little depending on how much oil you got on them, but it saves you some $

    If your brakes use DOT fluid, Keep if clean when you bleed them. DOT fluid has lots of corrosive additives that can ruin paint and rubber seals.

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