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  1. #26
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    I can't wait to check out a Goblin. Looks like a great bike with great components for the price.

  2. #27
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    Deleted.
    Last edited by nuffink; 08-24-2012 at 09:53 AM.

  3. #28
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    How do these bikes compare to the Trek or Giant mountain bikes?

  4. #29
    local bike dr.
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    There are a few threads in the forums discussing the quality and feel of Airborne's bikes, positive reviews are the norm. Common theme has been the great value, as they are decently equipped beginner bikes. Amongst the beginner / intermediate level bikes offered by larger manufacturers, Airborne consistently provides better equipped bicycles at each price point. Customer service has been top notch.

    In a week, I'll have my first Airborne, and will be able to provide a first-hand account of weld quality on their frames, feel of the geometry, etc.; and I'll compare it to what I've been accustomed to with my Trek.

    The top tier Trek and Giant bikes are just that, and Airborne does not (yet) have bikes at that level. So, if you are looking for a carbon fiber framed $3,000+ racing bike, you will have to look elsewhere. If you are looking at a bike costing $1100 from Trek or Giant, you can get it from Airborne for about $700, delivered to your door. Intermediate bikes @ $1600 from the big boys only run $1200 from Airborne. They even have beginner level bikes costing 20% less than Giant's, and better equipped to boot....

    Considering getting my 12yr. old one for his bday in a few months if I like my Guardian. Even the $300 Sabre is a big step up in quality and handling from his current Walgoose (which he loves). It's his first bike "with gears" and he rides it daily around town. I'll take him on his first _tame_ trail ride next month, if he enjoys the trails, then it'll just be a matter of saving up to buy him the Sabre.

  5. #30
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    I have never heard of Airborne Bikes but considering my currently duty station and the positive things in this thread, I am going to have to check them out.

  6. #31
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    Im loving the Guardian spec wise, but not sure I want a 29er.

    Cant wait to hear the review G0at!

  7. #32
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    When will Airborne be releasing the new models?

    Sent using my fat thumbs!

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loudviking View Post
    It's all good,I just remember how the old Airborne was beaten
    to death by the Bike Industry, and in turn the consumers who
    followed like sheep. Ti builders at that time couldn't compete with Airborne,
    so the slamming started, and it went down hill from there.
    Nor did they want to. Consumers were more than beaten to death, they got some pretty sh#tty product as well. The Chinese sourced tubing that Airborne used was crap.

    The 3-2.5 Chinese tubing had HUGE grain structure and the welds cracked with alarming regularity in the heat affected zones. Again, this is a predictible outcome and we in the industry warned them, they didn't listen and the consumers got left holding the bag when they crashed and burned.

    It's a totally new company now and Huffy is a pretty big name to have backing you up.
    Last edited by STT GUY; 08-29-2012 at 01:50 PM.
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  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by STT GUY View Post
    Nor did they want to. Consumers were more than beaten to death, they got some pretty sh#tty product as well. The Chinese sourced tubing that Airborne used was crap.

    The 3-2.5 Chinese tubing had HUGE grain structure and the welds cracked with alarming regularity in the heat affected zones. Again, this is a predictible outcome and we in the industry warned them, they didn't listen and the consumers got left holding the bag when they crashed and burned.

    It's a totally new company now and Huffy is a pretty big name to have backing you up.
    That's odd, where exactly did you get this info from. They had some problems
    like everyone else has had at one time or another, but it sounds like you are well informed.
    So how long do you think my 1999 Lucky Strike has, as it's been raced and rode and
    put away wet since it rolled off the assembly line, and it's still going strong. And who
    did you work for may I ask, as you stated that you were in the industry?
    Climb into the sky, never wonder why - Tailgunner
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  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loudviking View Post
    That's odd, where exactly did you get this info from. They had some problems
    like everyone else has had at one time or another, but it sounds like you are well informed.
    So how long do you think my 1999 Lucky Strike has, as it's been raced and rode and
    put away wet since it rolled off the assembly line, and it's still going strong. And who
    did you work for may I ask, as you stated that you were in the industry?
    I got the info from testing on the tubing in question and comparing it to domestic aerospace grade tubing in 1998 and 1999. Many top builders refused to use the Chinese seamless product some (very, very few..) used it...some got lucky and some didn't.

    Not every bike suffered a failure just like not every bike lasted "forever" like yours. Howerver there was a disturbing trend of failures.

    I worked for a major manufacturer of seamless tubing products here in the USA. Frankly the frame market was fun but a rather distracting as it was a very, very small part of our overall output. Our primary focus was seamless product for aerospace and exchanger tubing for critical (such as nuclear) applications. My association with them ended in late 2001.
    Monte
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  11. #36
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    As I don't really know if your credentials are as stated, I will give you the benefit of the doubt.
    It does amaze me that I have read way more positives of the bikes than negatives, and many owners,
    myself included, still have and love their bikes. As far as the integrity of the tubing, I don't understand
    how some were good, and some failed, if the tubing was the same for each bike? I do know I had a Dean
    and was not impressed with it, and got rid of it quickly. Suffice to say we agree to disagree, but
    I do appreciate your response.
    Climb into the sky, never wonder why - Tailgunner
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  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by STT GUY View Post
    I got the info from testing on the tubing in question and comparing it to domestic aerospace grade tubing in 1998 and 1999. Many top builders refused to use the Chinese seamless product some (very, very few..) used it...some got lucky and some didn't.

    Not every bike suffered a failure just like not every bike lasted "forever" like yours. Howerver there was a disturbing trend of failures.

    I worked for a major manufacturer of seamless tubing products here in the USA. Frankly the frame market was fun but a rather distracting as it was a very, very small part of our overall output. Our primary focus was seamless product for aerospace and exchanger tubing for critical (such as nuclear) applications. My association with them ended in late 2001.
    I'm hesitant to respond to this, but I feel I need to.

    I used to work at that Airborne long ago, and you are correct, we are a totally different company now with a completely different product (no Ti).

    However, the frames Airborne made out of 3/2.5 Ti (and later 6/4) were tested extensively and did not go into production unless they passed testing. Then testing was done randomly withe several samples during production to ensure that the first one was not a "golden sample". All of this done by an independant lab (ITS).

    The rate of warranty claims for frame failures was less than 1% during my period at the company.

    Not all 3/2.5 tubing was equal, nor was all Chinese 3/2.5. Is it quite possible you are talking about tubing in general and not the specific tubing that Airborne and other companies (like Habanero, Mongoose, etc) used?
    Airborne Dude.

  13. #38
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    I had one of the old Airborne ti Lucky Strikes. I got it in 2001 and rode it up until 2010 when it got stolen. Great bike....I don't know much about the new Airbornes though.
    Whiskey

  14. #39
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    I will defend Airborne to the end, my Lucky Strike will be
    buried with me as it was and still is an incredible bike.
    I am hoping the new Airborne will fair just as well, and Thanks BigDaddy,
    was waiting for you to chime in and clear the air.
    Climb into the sky, never wonder why - Tailgunner
    You're a Tailgunner

  15. #40
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    Their parent company is Huffy. Does that answer the question

    Quote Originally Posted by Kona0197 View Post
    I wasn't trying to troll, nor was that my intention. I was trying to make a point that Airborne can offer their bikes cheap because of Huffy. Poor choice of words i guess, my apologizes.
    Really? Give me a break, you are full of ****
    I'm sick of all the Irish stereotypes, as soon as I finish this beer I"m punching someone

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyFlyer View Post
    I used to work at that Airborne long ago, and you are correct, we are a totally different company now with a completely different product (no Ti).
    Do you ever wonder whether you might have been better off in choosing a less controversial name for the new company? Seems like there's a lot of negative inertia to overcome from using the Airborne name.

    Moot point now though. What's done is done.

  17. #42
    local bike dr.
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    So, my new Airborne is on the truck for delivery today. Been waiting years to buy another bike, have been riding crappy department store bikes since my venerable 1990 Trek 850 retired in 2001. Very anxious to see the UPS guy!!! yeah, this is worse than a kid waiting for his parents to get into the room so he can tear into his presents on xmas morning.... wonder if it will have that "new bike smell" ?

    Assembly notes: bike pulled out of the box as one unit after removing the small box w/ front QR skewer, manual, and reflectors.
    -untied ropes binding the front tire to the bike. carefully routed the left crank arm thru the spokes as i removed and set aside the front wheel.
    -removed protective foam/cardboard pieces that wrapped and protected the frame and handlebars (were attached w/ masking tape)
    -removed protective caps from front wheel axle and installed QR skewer
    -pulled insert from front brake caliper (held pads apart during transit)
    -installed front wheel (carefully aligning rotor in between brake pads)
    -5mm hex key to loosen both bolts holding stem to steer tube, rotated stem 180, tighten both bolts
    -5mm hex key to remove 4 bolts holding stem's handlebar cap, install handlebar, place cap on and tighten 4 bolts (tighten all 4 evenly, alternating top left, lower right, upper right, lower left, or something similar)
    -grease lightly applied to seatpost and inside frame's seat tube, loosen clamp with 5mm hex key, installed seat tube, tightened seat clamp
    -installed pedals (purchased elsewhere) I tightened them with a 5/8" open end wrench, could also use a hex key if you desired
    -placed chain on front sprocket (was resting on frame)
    -removed rear wheel axle protectors
    -adjusted rear derailleur (mine needed a few turns w/ phillips screwdriver on the lower limit and i had to let some cable out by loosening the 5mm allen bolt clamp located on the derailleur, think it was 1/4" or less of cable.)

    pictures to come tomorrow, after i have my first trail ride with the bike.

    BTW- front derailleur just touches the side knob tits of the rear tire; nothing rubs, as there is about 1/8" clearance to the side knobs of the kenda small block 8 (2.1") tires, but it should be noted that a wider rear tire will require some adjustments and/or modification.
    Last edited by G0at; 09-04-2012 at 06:36 PM. Reason: assembly update

  18. #43
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    Does anybody actually look up reviews on the old Airborne bikes,
    or is it a case of mud slinging with no bases for it? Still the same
    crap as back when they were in business, and I am sure opinions from
    people who never rode one. Sheep, all sheep.
    Climb into the sky, never wonder why - Tailgunner
    You're a Tailgunner

  19. #44
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    As someone who is closer to several of the names mentioned, I will provide my 3 cents.

    First of all, Airborne uses a Chinese OEM factory like probably 80%+ of the "big names" from Europe and the US.

    Secondly this particular factory is still supplying ti frames to many brands globally, including some really "cool" ones. Many of their products are regularly sold at over $3000 and have gotten good reviews. The factory is also associated with the Chinese Space and Aeronautics Ministry, and that's an area the Chinese are reasonably good at.

    The OLD airborne went down due to various business decisions that were not the most wise in hind sight. The products were generally well regarded, especially for the price.

    Products made by the same Chinese welders and craftsman, will be displayed in the USA again, in this year's Interbike in Las Vegas, in a few weeks.

    Even though these guys don't go by "Bob" or "Billy" or "Chad", and it will be a bit more time consuming to go shake hands with them, it does not change the fact that some of these guys have been doing this for over 20 years and can do a respectible job.
    Last edited by threefire; 09-04-2012 at 08:35 AM.

  20. #45
    Airborne Product Dude
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    Quote Originally Posted by JonathanGennick View Post
    Do you ever wonder whether you might have been better off in choosing a less controversial name for the new company? Seems like there's a lot of negative inertia to overcome from using the Airborne name.

    Moot point now though. What's done is done.
    There is much more goodwill associated with the name than bad inertia. There are way more happy Airborne owners out there than the few folks that complain may lead you to believe.

    The first Airborne was revolutionary in the way that it sold consumer direct and offered great customer service. That is the part that we liked about the first company and wanted to carry on.
    Airborne Dude.

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyFlyer View Post
    There is much more goodwill associated with the name than bad inertia. There are way more happy Airborne owners out there than the few folks that complain may lead you to believe.
    I bet you're right. I probably get a skewed picture from this forum.

    I'd only ever dimly heard of the brand when you took it over. Had no concept or image at all. Probably I had just seen the name in passing once or twice. But the bikes you're putting out now, those I notice. Someday I'd like to see one in person.

  22. #47
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    I have had an Airborne Marauder for 2 years and I really like the bike. There were some problems with the bottom bracket/crankset and the X7 rear derailluer siezed but I replaced both (FSA refused to warranty the BB and I am still trying to get SRAM to replace the derailluer) but they were parts I was going to upgrade anyways. The frame is bullet proof, as is the wheelset. The Spinner fork works better than expected and the rear Marzocchi shock is great. Airborne has been great with customer service, Eric (from Airborne) tried to talk with the guy from FSA but he stood by his opinion that it is normal for a bottom bracket to fail after two months. I love my Marauder and would not hesitate to buy a Taka, Toxin, or Wingman from them.

  23. #48
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    I've been really happy with my zeppelin. I wouldn't hesitate to purchase another bike from airborne. And I agree with longboarderj about their customer service, it is among the best out there.

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