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  1. #1
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    Out of the box Assembly

    guys,

    please share your experience with assembling your Airborne?

    Only Cons I can think of myself with Airborne or ordering bikes online:

    Assembly
    No Free Tune Ups (not sure what 12months of tune-ups would cost or if i'd even need/use it).

    Thanks,

  2. #2
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    No issues with setting up mine.

    But the bigger question is your comfort level, mechanical ability, confidence. Those are key.

    30 years ago my first full time job was at a bike shop, assembling bikes. Eventually became the repair shop manager. Times have change as well as bikes.

    Do I know how to bleed brakes, rebuild a shock? No. Could I do it? Probably, given the correct tools and enough research.

    Biggest issue I had with my 2nd Gen Goblin was dialing in the front dérailleur.(it wan't really a problem) Had to align it slightly and do some tweaking. Same with the rear, with the exception of the aligning. Heck, mine has less then 25 miles on it and is still be broken in.

    But after seeing how this bike was put together, even if you are a novice, it should be a fairly simple task.

  3. #3
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    Is assembly a case of putting on the seatpost/saddle, handlebars, front wheel/tire and making adjustments to everything? Or is the drivetrain in pieces etc and everything needs to be assembled?

  4. #4
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    I assembled my Guardian in about 20 minutes. It took a lot longer to take it out of all the packing material than it did to put it together.

    Basic setup included adjusting and tightening bolts, and minor drivetrain adjustments like tuning in the rear derailleur. This took maybe 15 minutes. I had to do this again after a month or so due to changes in the derailleur cables while riding. I also experienced some brake pad rub on the hydros which eventually required me to bleed them. This is not the norm though. A quick youtube search will net you some good stuff to watch so you can learn how to do it yourself. After 4 months of riding, I took my bike in to the shop to get a new fork put on. While I was there, I had them true the wheels and adjust the rear derailleur for me since I had bashed the hanger on something and couldn't get it tuned in right. This cost me $20. The mechanic said the wheels were mostly true, which surprised me because I don't even have a truing stand and was eyeballing it.
    Nathan

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    Would it be an insult to take an online purchased bike and have LBS assembly it?

    at the end of the day, business is business..and they would be getting one more bike in the shop then they already had...

    any idea how much it generally costs as well?

    thanks,

  6. #6
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    For the life of me, I can't understand why anyone would do this. Can you turn an allen wrench? If yes, then you can assemble a bike.

    Yes, your LBS will help you with this, especially this time of year when it's slow.
    Nathan

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    Quote Originally Posted by OilburnerDe View Post
    Do I know how to bleed brakes, rebuild a shock? No. Could I do it? Probably, given the correct tools and enough research .
    A shock rebuild is cake. Never done one till a few weeks back cuz my LBS is lazy. Forgot my tools at my shop. Did it with a crescent wrench, a hammer, and a screwdriver. And a injection syringe from the kitchen.

    The Internet is your friend. The next thing I need to learn is how to adjust my derailluers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dlynes View Post
    Would it be an insult to take an online purchased bike and have LBS assembly it?

    at the end of the day, business is business..and they would be getting one more bike in the shop then they already had...

    any idea how much it generally costs as well?

    thanks,
    Nope, no insult. They should have no problem helping you.
    Just dont tell them how much you paid for the bike

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by dhpeteinsc View Post
    Nope, no insult. They should have no problem helping you.
    Just dont tell them how much you paid for the bike
    thanks,

  10. #10
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    Just timed myself with the new goblin that just got delivered...12 minutes and two allen wrenches to get it built. Probably another 20 minutes of checking every bolt, bearing and cable, and to run through derailleur adjustment.

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    Took me about 30 min to assemble. Took another 30 min adjusting front and rear derailers (not including time spent watching how to videos on youtube).

    Sent from my DROID3 using Tapatalk 2

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    Mine just got delivered today. Haven't assembled yet, but peeked and they now are coming with the rear wheel and derailleur already attached. Was that your experience also 6 Myles? That makes it that much easier. If you have any mechanical aptitude at all, you won't have any trouble. Just take your time.

    Regards,

    Frank

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    Yep, my Airborne Delta came that way too.....REALLY speeds up things.

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    Hello fellow Airbornes,

    I just pulled the trigger on the new Goblin this past Monday. I can't wait to assemble this bike as it will be my first mtb. One question I have for the ones who already got their bike. How long did it take for you to get your bike from the time you place your order to the time you recieve? I'm just anxious I guess. :-)

    Cheers

  15. #15
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    Mine took 4 days. I live in Iowa and they ship from the west coast.
    Nathan

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    I've ordered 2 bikes from them, A Guardian and a Skyhawk. Both took about a week.

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    On my Zeppelin I had to install the fork, stem/handlebars, rear derailleur, seatpost and front tire and pedals, and i think that was it. And then I adjusted everything. The fork was already cut and the star nut was already installed so that was a breeze.

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    On my skyhawk, I just had to install seat, handle bars, pedals, and front wheel

    Sent from my DROID3 using Tapatalk 2

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    Assembly wasn't that difficult even though there is no instructions on how to put it together. My only problem right now is I can't seem to get my front disc break to stop hitting the brake pads when the wheels spins? Any suggestion would help. It creates this squeaky sound. YouTube hasn't really help me yet?

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    Quote Originally Posted by SD_Locals View Post
    Assembly wasn't that difficult even though there is no instructions on how to put it together. My only problem right now is I can't seem to get my front disc break to stop hitting the brake pads when the wheels spins? Any suggestion would help. It creates this squeaky sound. YouTube hasn't really help me yet?
    Did you align the caliper to the rotor?
    Set the wheel in the fork and secure it. loosen the fron caliper bolts so you can move the it round on the mount. Squeeze the front brake a few times and you should see the caliper move around. Squeeze and hold it, tighten the the two bolts and that should do it.

    There are several threads on here as well as other sites as well as youtube videos.

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    Thanks for the reply. I will try it out again like you said and see what happens? I've also notice that I can't really turn the front wheels and pedal the bike at the same time with out the top of my foot hitting the tires? Anyone have that problem? Will post up pictures later.

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    What size frame did you go with? How tall are you?

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    Frame: 16

    I'm 5'6.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by SD_Locals View Post
    Thanks for the reply. I will try it out again like you said and see what happens? I've also notice that I can't really turn the front wheels and pedal the bike at the same time with out the top of my foot hitting the tires? Anyone have that problem? Will post up pictures later.
    In order to fit the bike in the box with no resulting damage, the stem is turned around backwards on the steer tube. This is normal practice in the bike industry.

    It needs to be spun 180 degrees when you build the bike. If you didn't notice that and built it, the fork is effectively "backwards" which would result in greatly decreased toe clearance and whacky steering.

    Are the rotors both on the left (non-drive) side of the bike? If not, you need to loosen the two stem bolts on the back of the stem, spin it back around 180 degrees, then re-tighten.

    Hope that helps,

    Jeremy
    Please Note: I no longer work for Airborne. If you have an Airborne question or problem please contact them directly.

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    Thanks Jeremy! Toe overlap solved :-)

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    Re: Out of the box Assembly

    Would an all purpose grease be fine for greasing the pedal threads and seat post/tube? All purpose as in the same grease I use on my truck to grease tie rod ends etc. Any others places recommended to grease? Stem bolts? Thanks

  27. #27
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    I use to use pipe tape for the pedals as I use to switch pedals a lot. Work fine and convenient. I recommend getting a tube of Park grease, which will last a long time. Use it on you seat post and all threads on your bike.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by trevor_b View Post
    Would an all purpose grease be fine for greasing the pedal threads and seat post/tube? All purpose as in the same grease I use on my truck to grease tie rod ends etc. Any others places recommended to grease? Stem bolts? Thanks
    I don't see how the type of grease is critical.. we are not dealing with high or low temps just normal climatic extremes. Say 30 F to 110 F.

    My buddy uses John Deere tractor grease (green) and he has been riding for 20 years.

    I'm new to all this and use plain old white lithium grease. I suppose if you use a bike specific grease you will be a better rider.

  29. #29
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    Which grease to use on your bike is a discussion nearly as volatile as discussing what oil is best for your car or talking about religion! LOL.

    I use both the Park grease and also Phil Wood grease. Both have been good to me. But I also think white litium is probably OK for general use on a bike. Never tried JD Tractor grease but if its green maybe it has something in common with the Phil grease as it is green also.

    There are some places where the type of grease or lubricant IS critical, like for example if you are assembling a ti bike you definitely want to use the ti-prep that has copper in it.

    Jeremy
    Please Note: I no longer work for Airborne. If you have an Airborne question or problem please contact them directly.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyFlyer View Post
    Which grease to use on your bike is a discussion nearly as volatile as discussing what oil is best for your car or talking about religion! LOL.

    I use both the Park grease and also Phil Wood grease. Both have been good to me. But I also think white litium is probably OK for general use on a bike. Never tried JD Tractor grease but if its green maybe it has something in common with the Phil grease as it is green also.

    There are some places where the type of grease or lubricant IS critical, like for example if you are assembling a ti bike you definitely want to use the ti-prep that has copper in it.

    Jeremy
    Never knew that BDF. I have heard that if you use the John Deere tractor grease you get an increase in low end torque which helps with hill climbing. Also imparts a nice rumbling diesel sound to the hubs and gears.

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    Re: Out of the box Assembly

    Looks like JD tractor grease is the ticket. Does black smoke also come out of a smoke stack?

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by trevor_b View Post
    Looks like JD tractor grease is the ticket. Does black smoke also come out of a smoke stack?
    Actually, yes. I picked up a nice chrome stack on clearance at Jenson. Difficult install so I had help from my LBS. Smokes like a champ. Only problem is on one of my favorite trails there are quite a few low limbs so it's a struggle.

    I have been toying with the idea of fabricating some sort of hinge device for the stack.

    Sort of like a dropper post. Low limb ahead, just hit the button. Only problem so far ishow to best mount the strut assembly to the stack. I'm trying to keep the bike weight down below 55 pounds.

    Hoping to have project finished in time for my Goblin which arrives on Thursday.

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    Re: Out of the box Assembly

    Hahaha. Nice.

    Where are you located? I'm on my phone so I can't see locations if you have that field populated. My goblin is scheduled to be delivered tomorrow (Wednesday), I'm in the Austin, TX area.

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    Quote Originally Posted by trevor_b View Post
    Hahaha. Nice.

    Where are you located? I'm on my phone so I can't see locations if you have that field populated. My goblin is scheduled to be delivered tomorrow (Wednesday), I'm in the Austin, TX area.
    Ocala, Fl. Just south of Gainesville. North central part of state.

    Jenson has 2 stacks left so if your interested I suggest you order right away. You may also want to install the air horns they have on clearance. Not sure where you would mount the compressor. Maybe on a bracket between top tube and seat tube ??

  35. #35
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    I received my Airborne Goblin this week and while I had the bike unpacked and put together with minimal strain I am struggling getting the kinks worked out. The front brake has been rubbing since I put the wheel on.

    I first attempted the recommendation found in the Avid manual that was included with the bike for the brakes. Which amounted to simply loosening the mounting bolts applying some brake pressure and retightening. No luck...

    After trolling some posts I then tried to remove the entire assembly, take out the pads and fully depress the pistons. When reattaching to the bike I placed two business cards between the rotor and pads, repeated the mounting instructions in the manual. No luck...

    I then contacted Airborne for their input and was essentially that rotor could be warped and I should watch a youtube video for help. The video outlined how to bend the rotor back into true using either a special tool or a crescent wrench. When I followed up with support asking if this was common place to have to take a wrench to bend a new rotor, I was told that it was not uncommon to have to "dial a rotor in".

    While I am admittedly not a bike mechanic - this seems a bit heavy handed solution for a brand new bike. So I am not debating on what to try next...I really dont want to take a wrench to the rotor and then end up having to replace it or take it to LBS after I probably mess it up more, or take it to a LBS and pay for them to fix it.

    That is my experience thus far with my Airborne - bike looks awesome, however maybe a bit beyond basic skills to dial in.

    I was also surprised that the bike came with no instructions on unpacking / assembly. I did get a manual for the bike and components, but nothing mentioning assembly steps.

    Sorry for the hijack - I dont have enough posts to create a new topic and this was as close a subject I could find.

    Good luck with assembly!

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Usulsuspct View Post
    I received my Airborne Goblin this week and while I had the bike unpacked and put together with minimal strain I am struggling getting the kinks worked out. The front brake has been rubbing since I put the wheel on.

    I first attempted the recommendation found in the Avid manual that was included with the bike for the brakes. Which amounted to simply loosening the mounting bolts applying some brake pressure and retightening. No luck...

    After trolling some posts I then tried to remove the entire assembly, take out the pads and fully depress the pistons. When reattaching to the bike I placed two business cards between the rotor and pads, repeated the mounting instructions in the manual. No luck...

    I then contacted Airborne for their input and was essentially that rotor could be warped and I should watch a youtube video for help. The video outlined how to bend the rotor back into true using either a special tool or a crescent wrench. When I followed up with support asking if this was common place to have to take a wrench to bend a new rotor, I was told that it was not uncommon to have to "dial a rotor in".

    While I am admittedly not a bike mechanic - this seems a bit heavy handed solution for a brand new bike. So I am not debating on what to try next...I really dont want to take a wrench to the rotor and then end up having to replace it or take it to LBS after I probably mess it up more, or take it to a LBS and pay for them to fix it.

    That is my experience thus far with my Airborne - bike looks awesome, however maybe a bit beyond basic skills to dial in.

    I was also surprised that the bike came with no instructions on unpacking / assembly. I did get a manual for the bike and components, but nothing mentioning assembly steps.

    Sorry for the hijack - I dont have enough posts to create a new topic and this was as close a subject I could find.

    Good luck with assembly!
    Chances are its the rotor none of those things work. Your LBS mechanic should have a tool that will true the rotor by heat and it shouldn't cost too much. And you have too be mechanically inclined to build them, this is partially agreeable.

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    I dont mean to sell myself short...I would consider myself mechanically inclined just not exactly bike smart. My last experience with bikes was pre-suspension era mechanical brakes

    I just pulled the wheel off and reseated, performed the Avid instructions and the wheel rub seems to be gone. Although I am afraid to take the wheel off again!

    Now on to tweak the shifting as it seems to be missing on some gears. Just need to get this thing buttoned up to get out this weekend. We may be in for our first decent temps of the year.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Usulsuspct View Post
    I was also surprised that the bike came with no instructions on unpacking / assembly. I did get a manual for the bike and components, but nothing mentioning assembly steps.
    For what it is worth, I have never assembled a bike that came with unpacking and assembly instructions. Hundreds of Schwinns, Giant's, GT, Mongoose etc. So it is not something that Airborne ommited like you may think. It is not like a piece of furniture from IKEA, where instructions are almost a requirement.

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    Quote Originally Posted by OilburnerDe View Post
    For what it is worth, I have never assembled a bike that came with unpacking and assembly instructions. Hundreds of Schwinns, Giant's, GT, Mongoose etc. So it is not something that Airborne ommited like you may think. It is not like a piece of furniture from IKEA, where instructions are almost a requirement.
    Thats cool - I have never purchased a bike like this before so I am not sure what is typical or not. That being said the assembly was pretty simple. I guess it depends somewhat on who Airborne envisions is their target market.

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    Re: Out of the box Assembly

    I got my goblin yesterday and assembled it with no issues except for the brakes rubbing as well.

    How much daylight should you see between the pad and rotor? Both the front and rear looks like the pads are in contact with the rotor. I tried to adjust the calipers using the mounting bolts but it just looks like the pads are too close to the rotor to begin with. This is my first set of hydraulic brakes.

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    Just replied to your email, check it!

    Thanks,

    Jeremy
    Please Note: I no longer work for Airborne. If you have an Airborne question or problem please contact them directly.

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    Re: Out of the box Assembly

    Thanks Jeremy! I will try that when I get home.

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    Re: Out of the box Assembly

    So I got the rear to stop rubbing but the front is still giving me issues. I'm at a loss. Using a flat head screwdriver or even the bleed block/pad spacer that was provided and no luck. How hard do I need to "pry" the pads apart? I'm worried I will pry too hard do I haven't really gone at it hard.

    Another question, in order to keep the cables from rubbing on top of of the fork, is it ok to zip tie them together up higher on the head tube (kinda in front of the the "A" on the head tube)? I don't want to have to shorten the cables right out of the box.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by trevor_b View Post
    Another question, in order to keep the cables from rubbing on top of of the fork, is it ok to zip tie them together up higher on the head tube (kinda in front of the the "A" on the head tube)? I don't want to have to shorten the cables right out of the box.
    I used black electrical tape - not to hold the cable, but as a buffer to prevent it from rubbing on the fork and paint on the frame. Can't even see it.
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    Out of the box Assembly

    Quote Originally Posted by trevor_b View Post
    So I got the rear to stop rubbing but the front is still giving me issues. I'm at a loss. Using a flat head screwdriver or even the bleed block/pad spacer that was provided and no luck. How hard do I need to "pry" the pads apart? I'm worried I will pry too hard do I haven't really gone at it hard.

    Another question, in order to keep the cables from rubbing on top of of the fork, is it ok to zip tie them together up higher on the head tube (kinda in front of the the "A" on the head tube)? I don't want to have to shorten the cables right out of the box.
    You shouldn't use a screw driver it will damage the pads. Use something plastic to prevent that damage
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    If the pads have been opened up and the caliper is centered on the rotor and its still rubbing, the last thing to check is to ensure your wheel is fully inserted properly and straight in the drop-outs of the fork. You'd be surprised how many times a brake rubbing issue is due to this seemingly small detail.

    Jeremy
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    ^^^^ This.

    Trevor, where are you located? Maybe someone on this board could take a look at it if you are local to them. Also, if you are an old person like myself, go have a cup of tea, take a break, and come back to it. I'm betting this is a simple fix.

    Good luck.
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    Re: Out of the box Assembly

    Lol I'm only 24 but I did have some tea.

    I'll get back at it in a little bit. I really press the fork down to ensure the QR is fully seated, and try to not to move the tire as I tighten the nut. I'll give it another try in a little bit.

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    Re: Out of the box Assembly

    In my case, my green Goblin's rear brake rubbed a bit when I first took delivery of the bike. Bleeding the system just a tad resolved the issue.

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    Out of the box Assembly-image.jpg
    Quote Originally Posted by trevor_b View Post
    Lol I'm only 24 but I did have some tea.

    I'll get back at it in a little bit. I really press the fork down to ensure the QR is fully seated, and try to not to move the tire as I tighten the nut. I'll give it another try in a little bit.
    I know it doesn't help you much but my front brake rubbing finally stopped. I did a combination of removing caliper and pads, depressing pistons and removing tire. Magically after trying all of this on a few separate occasions the rubbing stopped. When the rubbing stopped I carefully tightened down the caliper by alternately tightening the mounting bolts. So far so good.

    I did notice that ne of my pads looked like it was "missing" a bit of material which I thought was odd but it's working now so I am hesitant to futz with it anymore.

    (I attached a pic of my pads - sorta hard to tell but pad on left looked like a portion was missing.)

    Good luck! I am now learning about dérailleur tweaking.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Usulsuspct View Post
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    I know it doesn't help you much but my front brake rubbing finally stopped. I did a combination of removing caliper and pads, depressing pistons and removing tire. Magically after trying all of this on a few separate occasions the rubbing stopped. When the rubbing stopped I carefully tightened down the caliper by alternately tightening the mounting bolts. So far so good.

    I did notice that ne of my pads looked like it was "missing" a bit of material which I thought was odd but it's working now so I am hesitant to futz with it anymore.

    (I attached a pic of my pads - sorta hard to tell but pad on left looked like a portion was missing.)

    Good luck! I am now learning about dérailleur tweaking.
    I think when you were originally trying to adjust your brakes you damaged that pad with whatever method. As long as it has good integrety and stopping power you should be fine for a while.

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    Can't rule anything out, but I did remove pads before depressing pistons. Only thing I can think of is maybe I wasn't careful enough putting front wheel on at some point and the rotor caught the lip maybe?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Usulsuspct View Post
    Can't rule anything out, but I did remove pads before depressing pistons. Only thing I can think of is maybe I wasn't careful enough putting front wheel on at some point and the rotor caught the lip maybe?
    Thats a possibility I guess. Does the bike still stop well?

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    Quote Originally Posted by sfb12 View Post
    Thats a possibility I guess. Does the bike still stop well?
    Haven't been able to get out on the bike yet for its maiden voyage. The weather should be nice both tomorrow and Sunday. If all goes as planned I should be able to get some miles in this weekend.

    The brake seems to have good stopping power in my living room

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    Hopefully it will be all good then. Worst case scenario your LBS sells replacement organic pads for cheap.. or at least should. I don't think you will have a problem though.

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    Went for first ride today. All in all a fun time. Front brake did start to rub soon after leaving the house and the shifting still isn't dialed in but I did enjoy myself. I also learned a couple of things: the clips are coming off and flats are going on, ate it twice (most definitely a rider problem!); snow is no easier to ride through than it was 10 years ago

    I am going to take one more crack at dialing things in and then it's off to lbs for tuneup. I had hoped to wait a couple of months before taking it in and let things break in first but that may not be an option.

  57. #57
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    I had to dial in my Goblin extensively - both the brakes and most of all the rear deraileur. I had no clue where to start or what to do. I also refused to have the lbs touch my bike because they are a bunch of arrogant a$$es. Anyway, I went right to YouTube to research the issues. A few hours later the problems were gone. Try it first before you pay someone else.
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    I don't dislike my lbs - so at some point my time becomes worth more than the cost to let them get things straightened out OR tell me that something else is wrong and I am not just a dummy. I have been watching vids and trolling the boards for tips. I think I finally get what the limits and barrel adjustments all do - during the ride it was just a specific combination of gears that gave me fits. So I will see start there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zerort View Post
    I had to dial in my Goblin extensively - both the brakes and most of all the rear deraileur. I had no clue where to start or what to do. I also refused to have the lbs touch my bike because they are a bunch of arrogant a$$es. Anyway, I went right to YouTube to research the issues. A few hours later the problems were gone. Try it first before you pay someone else.
    Find a different LBS. As I mentioned in a different thread cost me $8.50 to have derailleur adjusted. Oh yes they also checked the torque on the stem, seat etc. Sure youtube is a help but for the money I got out and rode.

    Do you have but one LBS in your area?

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by drjay9051 View Post
    Find a different LBS.
    Why?
    Since this is the "Out of the Box Assembly" thread I said "I had to dial in my Goblin extensively" ----- that is "out of the box and during assembly". Make sense now Jay?

    And since I used use the word "had", it means it is already done. It also took me 20 minutes tops.

    My post was for the OP and others that have troubles dialing in their bikes OUT OF THE BOX.

    I don't need to find a different LBS.

    I'm glad the LBS route went great for you, but some don't have a local LBS close to them or the time to take it there.

    As for getting out and riding, ....LOL, if you look in my other posts I've been putting the Goblin through its paces. My modified Goblin that is. The one I modified myself... LOL
    by Silentfoe
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zerort View Post
    Why?
    Since this is the "Out of the Box Assembly" thread I said "I had to dial in my Goblin extensively" ----- that is "out of the box and during assembly". Make sense now Jay?

    And since I used use the word "had", it means it is already done. It also took me 20 minutes tops.

    My post was for the OP and others that have troubles dialing in their bikes OUT OF THE BOX.

    I don't need to find a different LBS.

    I'm glad the LBS route went great for you, but some don't have a local LBS close to them or the time to take it there.

    As for getting out and riding, ....LOL, if you look in my other posts I've been putting the Goblin through its paces. My modified Goblin that is. The one I modified myself... LOL
    O.K. Second post back to me with a bit of attitude. Bad marriage, money issues, erectile dysfunction ? What is the problem.

    I simply suggested another LBS if the one you deal with has a bunch of
    "arrogant a$$es".

    Not everyone wants to spend hours on you tube to learn the correct way to dial in the limit screws on the derailleur etc. Glald it worked for you. And i mean that sincerely !!

    Glad you got it finished and are enjoying. Again simple suggestion to anybody on the board: if you are frustrated patronize your LBS. Of course use one that does not employ "arrogant a$$es".

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    Quote Originally Posted by drjay9051 View Post
    O.K. Second post back to me with a bit of attitude. Bad marriage, money issues, erectile dysfunction ? What is the problem.
    LOL, nope clearly not money issues, and my penis works just fine - not that old yet. As far as I know my marriage seems fine - but you never know these days, right?

    Probably lack of sleep and the fact I'm working on Sunday.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zerort View Post
    LOL, nope clearly not money issues, and my penis works just fine - not that old yet. As far as I know my marriage seems fine - but you never know these days, right?

    Probably lack of sleep and the fact I'm working on Sunday.
    Truce !! Understood. Just thought "we" had a problem. Which would be odd as we have never met. Glad your Goblin is working out for you.

    Have a great day!!!!

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    Yeah we do our best to get the bikes tuned and adjusted before packing them, but unfortunately shipping them around the country means on occasion things get knocked out of adjustment and need a slight tweaking.

    We've done a few assembly videos that are up on our youtube page that are somewhat model-specific, but in general apply to most of our models.

    We've went back and forth here about doing detailed assembly instructions to include with each model, but the problem we run into is what to include in it. We could do a one-sheeter that's a quick down and dirty one, but that doesn't cover everything that could possibly need attention. So then that morphs into doing a huge thick book that almost needs to be model-specific as the parts are all different per models; for example adjusting Tektro brakes is different than adjusting Elixir 9's. Our current included owners manual is the same BPSA owners manual that almost all of the major bike manufacturers are using now. Its a decent generic manual but certainly isn't part-specific.

    Like someone mentioned earlier in the thread its not like putting together Ikea furniture; putting together a bike and troubleshooting issues sometimes requires mechanical aptitude that we can't impart in an assembly sheet.

    We know that not everyone that buys a bike can work in it themselves, and that's where shops come in. If you have a decent shop near you, they should be happy to work on your bike when you need them to. It adds $$ to their bottom line and you will keep them in mind when you need something.

    Anyway, glad to see you guys are up and running! give us a call or email if you need anything, thanks!

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    Hi Guys! I used to ride a ton in my younger days (and have the scars to prove it!). I decided to sell my old faithful and get back into riding, albeit much gentler this time around since I am older and have kids I am responsible for. I got the Skyhawk on Tuesday, put it together pretty quickly (maybe 20-30 minutes). I did not have a presta pump or adapter until yesterday, but quickly found the front brake rubbing and the shifter to be missing a gear or two. Since all this stuff has changed since my previous riding days, I plan to take it to an LBS to make sure it's all adjusted right. I like messing with stuff, except if a mistake may kill me (electricity, brakes on a car or bike, etc!!) Hope to get some decent weather to ride this weekend after the tweaks!

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by mahers View Post
    Hi Guys! I used to ride a ton in my younger days (and have the scars to prove it!). I decided to sell my old faithful and get back into riding, albeit much gentler this time around since I am older and have kids I am responsible for. I got the Skyhawk on Tuesday, put it together pretty quickly (maybe 20-30 minutes). I did not have a presta pump or adapter until yesterday, but quickly found the front brake rubbing and the shifter to be missing a gear or two. Since all this stuff has changed since my previous riding days, I plan to take it to an LBS to make sure it's all adjusted right. I like messing with stuff, except if a mistake may kill me (electricity, brakes on a car or bike, etc!!) Hope to get some decent weather to ride this weekend after the tweaks!
    You can fix those things yourself with a screwdriver and allen wrenches. I mean if you are interested and want to save some money that is.

    Probably the easiest is the brakes. Loosen the mounts, squeeze your brake handles a few times, then tighten. This may take a few instances but its an easy fix.

    For your deraileurs, watch some youtube vids and adjust with a screwdriver. You'll get it.
    by Silentfoe
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    Zerort,

    I think I may give it a shot since I am off of work next week and it's supposed to rain so I won't do much riding. Thanks for the reply.

    Edit: I was able to fix the brakes (the rotors were not true), but for the life of me, I can't get the derailers right. Off to the LBS, unfortunately
    Last edited by mahers; 03-29-2013 at 07:38 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mahers View Post
    Zerort,

    I think I may give it a shot since I am off of work next week and it's supposed to rain so I won't do much riding. Thanks for the reply.

    Edit: I was able to fix the brakes (the rotors were not true), but for the life of me, I can't get the derailers right. Off to the LBS, unfortunately
    I think I'm going to do the same. Without a bike stand, it's hard for my untrained eyes to see what's going on with the derailleurs. When upshifting (I think it was, maybe the other way around) the rear there is some hesitation from shift to shift, when downshifting it's smooth as butter. I've also got some brake rub going on, I did the "simple" adjustment several times and it improved, but it's not perfect.

    I probably need to get acquainted with a LBS anyway.

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    Re: Out of the box Assembly

    Quote Originally Posted by bleedinblue View Post
    I think I'm going to do the same. Without a bike stand, it's hard for my untrained eyes to see what's going on with the derailleurs. When upshifting (I think it was, maybe the other way around) the rear there is some hesitation from shift to shift, when downshifting it's smooth as butter. I've also got some brake rub going on, I did the "simple" adjustment several times and it improved, but it's not perfect.

    I probably need to get acquainted with a LBS anyway.
    I took it to REI and $30 later, it's perfect!

    Sent from my RAZR MAXX via Tapatalk 2

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by mahers View Post
    I took it to REI and $30 later, it's perfect!

    Sent from my RAZR MAXX via Tapatalk 2
    Gld to hear you got it set up perfectly. At least u gave it a shot on your own.
    by Silentfoe
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    I'm going to order a shock pump tonight for my Goblin that should be here Friday. Are there any other tools I should get to put this big together?

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    Re: Out of the box Assembly

    Metric allen wrenches. I think you only need 5 and 6 mm.

  73. #73
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    Just wanted to share my experience...I am new to mountain biking and despite a little bit of uncertainty I decided to attempt tuning the bike myself. Even though it took me a couple of hours (including internet research/youtube videos) I finally had my Goblin assembled and shifting perfectly.

    Anyway, I absolutely love the new bike and glad I decided to tune it myself because I am now much more familiar with the way things work in case it needs maintenance in the future.

    After the initial setup, once you familiarize yourself with the way the Derailleurs work, future adjustments should be a breeze.

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    I got my bike today. From opening the box to ridding was less than an hour. I still plan to take the bike to my LBS and have them go over everything and adjust it before I head out on the trails. My peace of mind is worth $35.

    What are the two rivet looking things in the plastic bag with what I assume are screws for the reflectors?

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by jdhunt0 View Post
    I got my bike today. From opening the box to ridding was less than an hour. I still plan to take the bike to my LBS and have them go over everything and adjust it before I head out on the trails. My peace of mind is worth $35.

    What are the two rivet looking things in the plastic bag with what I assume are screws for the reflectors?
    I think those are spare butt ends that can be crimped onto the end of the derailleur cables? Thats what they look like to me

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    I'd say you are right.

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    Those are extra cable finishing ends in case you want to shorten your cables to a length other than supplied, thanks.
    Please Note: I no longer work for Airborne. If you have an Airborne question or problem please contact them directly.

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    Got my Goblin today. It was packed really well and arrived in perfect shape other than a small nick in the frame. There will be a lot more to go with that I'm sure so no big deal. I had to fiddle with the brakes quite a bit as I was getting some rubbing even after following the adjustment procedure in the Avid manual. I ended up adjusting by sound- spinning the tire, listening for rub, moving the top or bottom of the brake, etc. It took awhile but I finally have some quiet brakes. Other than that, not much to speak of. I put a bit of electrical tape on the cables to prevent scuffs on my fork. Speaking of the fork, is the lockout hard or soft (not sure if that's the correct terminology)? When locked, I still had some rebound, just not as much as when unlocked. Hopefully it will warm up here in the next few days and melt the snow we got over the weekend so I can hit the trails.

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    Out of the box Assembly

    It will still give just a bit. Only about 10 mm would be my guess.

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    Out of the box assembly was a breeze on the sabre, all the derailleurs and brakes were set up well enough that they didn't need any adjustment at all..

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