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  1. #26
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    Re: Out of the box Assembly

    Would an all purpose grease be fine for greasing the pedal threads and seat post/tube? All purpose as in the same grease I use on my truck to grease tie rod ends etc. Any others places recommended to grease? Stem bolts? Thanks

  2. #27
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    I use to use pipe tape for the pedals as I use to switch pedals a lot. Work fine and convenient. I recommend getting a tube of Park grease, which will last a long time. Use it on you seat post and all threads on your bike.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by trevor_b View Post
    Would an all purpose grease be fine for greasing the pedal threads and seat post/tube? All purpose as in the same grease I use on my truck to grease tie rod ends etc. Any others places recommended to grease? Stem bolts? Thanks
    I don't see how the type of grease is critical.. we are not dealing with high or low temps just normal climatic extremes. Say 30 F to 110 F.

    My buddy uses John Deere tractor grease (green) and he has been riding for 20 years.

    I'm new to all this and use plain old white lithium grease. I suppose if you use a bike specific grease you will be a better rider.

  4. #29
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    Which grease to use on your bike is a discussion nearly as volatile as discussing what oil is best for your car or talking about religion! LOL.

    I use both the Park grease and also Phil Wood grease. Both have been good to me. But I also think white litium is probably OK for general use on a bike. Never tried JD Tractor grease but if its green maybe it has something in common with the Phil grease as it is green also.

    There are some places where the type of grease or lubricant IS critical, like for example if you are assembling a ti bike you definitely want to use the ti-prep that has copper in it.

    Jeremy
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  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyFlyer View Post
    Which grease to use on your bike is a discussion nearly as volatile as discussing what oil is best for your car or talking about religion! LOL.

    I use both the Park grease and also Phil Wood grease. Both have been good to me. But I also think white litium is probably OK for general use on a bike. Never tried JD Tractor grease but if its green maybe it has something in common with the Phil grease as it is green also.

    There are some places where the type of grease or lubricant IS critical, like for example if you are assembling a ti bike you definitely want to use the ti-prep that has copper in it.

    Jeremy
    Never knew that BDF. I have heard that if you use the John Deere tractor grease you get an increase in low end torque which helps with hill climbing. Also imparts a nice rumbling diesel sound to the hubs and gears.

  6. #31
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    Re: Out of the box Assembly

    Looks like JD tractor grease is the ticket. Does black smoke also come out of a smoke stack?

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by trevor_b View Post
    Looks like JD tractor grease is the ticket. Does black smoke also come out of a smoke stack?
    Actually, yes. I picked up a nice chrome stack on clearance at Jenson. Difficult install so I had help from my LBS. Smokes like a champ. Only problem is on one of my favorite trails there are quite a few low limbs so it's a struggle.

    I have been toying with the idea of fabricating some sort of hinge device for the stack.

    Sort of like a dropper post. Low limb ahead, just hit the button. Only problem so far ishow to best mount the strut assembly to the stack. I'm trying to keep the bike weight down below 55 pounds.

    Hoping to have project finished in time for my Goblin which arrives on Thursday.

  8. #33
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    Re: Out of the box Assembly

    Hahaha. Nice.

    Where are you located? I'm on my phone so I can't see locations if you have that field populated. My goblin is scheduled to be delivered tomorrow (Wednesday), I'm in the Austin, TX area.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by trevor_b View Post
    Hahaha. Nice.

    Where are you located? I'm on my phone so I can't see locations if you have that field populated. My goblin is scheduled to be delivered tomorrow (Wednesday), I'm in the Austin, TX area.
    Ocala, Fl. Just south of Gainesville. North central part of state.

    Jenson has 2 stacks left so if your interested I suggest you order right away. You may also want to install the air horns they have on clearance. Not sure where you would mount the compressor. Maybe on a bracket between top tube and seat tube ??

  10. #35
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    I received my Airborne Goblin this week and while I had the bike unpacked and put together with minimal strain I am struggling getting the kinks worked out. The front brake has been rubbing since I put the wheel on.

    I first attempted the recommendation found in the Avid manual that was included with the bike for the brakes. Which amounted to simply loosening the mounting bolts applying some brake pressure and retightening. No luck...

    After trolling some posts I then tried to remove the entire assembly, take out the pads and fully depress the pistons. When reattaching to the bike I placed two business cards between the rotor and pads, repeated the mounting instructions in the manual. No luck...

    I then contacted Airborne for their input and was essentially that rotor could be warped and I should watch a youtube video for help. The video outlined how to bend the rotor back into true using either a special tool or a crescent wrench. When I followed up with support asking if this was common place to have to take a wrench to bend a new rotor, I was told that it was not uncommon to have to "dial a rotor in".

    While I am admittedly not a bike mechanic - this seems a bit heavy handed solution for a brand new bike. So I am not debating on what to try next...I really dont want to take a wrench to the rotor and then end up having to replace it or take it to LBS after I probably mess it up more, or take it to a LBS and pay for them to fix it.

    That is my experience thus far with my Airborne - bike looks awesome, however maybe a bit beyond basic skills to dial in.

    I was also surprised that the bike came with no instructions on unpacking / assembly. I did get a manual for the bike and components, but nothing mentioning assembly steps.

    Sorry for the hijack - I dont have enough posts to create a new topic and this was as close a subject I could find.

    Good luck with assembly!

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Usulsuspct View Post
    I received my Airborne Goblin this week and while I had the bike unpacked and put together with minimal strain I am struggling getting the kinks worked out. The front brake has been rubbing since I put the wheel on.

    I first attempted the recommendation found in the Avid manual that was included with the bike for the brakes. Which amounted to simply loosening the mounting bolts applying some brake pressure and retightening. No luck...

    After trolling some posts I then tried to remove the entire assembly, take out the pads and fully depress the pistons. When reattaching to the bike I placed two business cards between the rotor and pads, repeated the mounting instructions in the manual. No luck...

    I then contacted Airborne for their input and was essentially that rotor could be warped and I should watch a youtube video for help. The video outlined how to bend the rotor back into true using either a special tool or a crescent wrench. When I followed up with support asking if this was common place to have to take a wrench to bend a new rotor, I was told that it was not uncommon to have to "dial a rotor in".

    While I am admittedly not a bike mechanic - this seems a bit heavy handed solution for a brand new bike. So I am not debating on what to try next...I really dont want to take a wrench to the rotor and then end up having to replace it or take it to LBS after I probably mess it up more, or take it to a LBS and pay for them to fix it.

    That is my experience thus far with my Airborne - bike looks awesome, however maybe a bit beyond basic skills to dial in.

    I was also surprised that the bike came with no instructions on unpacking / assembly. I did get a manual for the bike and components, but nothing mentioning assembly steps.

    Sorry for the hijack - I dont have enough posts to create a new topic and this was as close a subject I could find.

    Good luck with assembly!
    Chances are its the rotor none of those things work. Your LBS mechanic should have a tool that will true the rotor by heat and it shouldn't cost too much. And you have too be mechanically inclined to build them, this is partially agreeable.

  12. #37
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    I dont mean to sell myself short...I would consider myself mechanically inclined just not exactly bike smart. My last experience with bikes was pre-suspension era mechanical brakes

    I just pulled the wheel off and reseated, performed the Avid instructions and the wheel rub seems to be gone. Although I am afraid to take the wheel off again!

    Now on to tweak the shifting as it seems to be missing on some gears. Just need to get this thing buttoned up to get out this weekend. We may be in for our first decent temps of the year.

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Usulsuspct View Post
    I was also surprised that the bike came with no instructions on unpacking / assembly. I did get a manual for the bike and components, but nothing mentioning assembly steps.
    For what it is worth, I have never assembled a bike that came with unpacking and assembly instructions. Hundreds of Schwinns, Giant's, GT, Mongoose etc. So it is not something that Airborne ommited like you may think. It is not like a piece of furniture from IKEA, where instructions are almost a requirement.

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by OilburnerDe View Post
    For what it is worth, I have never assembled a bike that came with unpacking and assembly instructions. Hundreds of Schwinns, Giant's, GT, Mongoose etc. So it is not something that Airborne ommited like you may think. It is not like a piece of furniture from IKEA, where instructions are almost a requirement.
    Thats cool - I have never purchased a bike like this before so I am not sure what is typical or not. That being said the assembly was pretty simple. I guess it depends somewhat on who Airborne envisions is their target market.

  15. #40
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    Re: Out of the box Assembly

    I got my goblin yesterday and assembled it with no issues except for the brakes rubbing as well.

    How much daylight should you see between the pad and rotor? Both the front and rear looks like the pads are in contact with the rotor. I tried to adjust the calipers using the mounting bolts but it just looks like the pads are too close to the rotor to begin with. This is my first set of hydraulic brakes.

  16. #41
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    Just replied to your email, check it!

    Thanks,

    Jeremy
    Homebrewer, Patriot, Amateur Photographer

  17. #42
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    Re: Out of the box Assembly

    Thanks Jeremy! I will try that when I get home.

  18. #43
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    Re: Out of the box Assembly

    So I got the rear to stop rubbing but the front is still giving me issues. I'm at a loss. Using a flat head screwdriver or even the bleed block/pad spacer that was provided and no luck. How hard do I need to "pry" the pads apart? I'm worried I will pry too hard do I haven't really gone at it hard.

    Another question, in order to keep the cables from rubbing on top of of the fork, is it ok to zip tie them together up higher on the head tube (kinda in front of the the "A" on the head tube)? I don't want to have to shorten the cables right out of the box.

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by trevor_b View Post
    Another question, in order to keep the cables from rubbing on top of of the fork, is it ok to zip tie them together up higher on the head tube (kinda in front of the the "A" on the head tube)? I don't want to have to shorten the cables right out of the box.
    I used black electrical tape - not to hold the cable, but as a buffer to prevent it from rubbing on the fork and paint on the frame. Can't even see it.
    2013 Rocky Mountain Altitude 730
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  20. #45
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    Out of the box Assembly

    Quote Originally Posted by trevor_b View Post
    So I got the rear to stop rubbing but the front is still giving me issues. I'm at a loss. Using a flat head screwdriver or even the bleed block/pad spacer that was provided and no luck. How hard do I need to "pry" the pads apart? I'm worried I will pry too hard do I haven't really gone at it hard.

    Another question, in order to keep the cables from rubbing on top of of the fork, is it ok to zip tie them together up higher on the head tube (kinda in front of the the "A" on the head tube)? I don't want to have to shorten the cables right out of the box.
    You shouldn't use a screw driver it will damage the pads. Use something plastic to prevent that damage
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  21. #46
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    If the pads have been opened up and the caliper is centered on the rotor and its still rubbing, the last thing to check is to ensure your wheel is fully inserted properly and straight in the drop-outs of the fork. You'd be surprised how many times a brake rubbing issue is due to this seemingly small detail.

    Jeremy
    Homebrewer, Patriot, Amateur Photographer

  22. #47
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    ^^^^ This.

    Trevor, where are you located? Maybe someone on this board could take a look at it if you are local to them. Also, if you are an old person like myself, go have a cup of tea, take a break, and come back to it. I'm betting this is a simple fix.

    Good luck.
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  23. #48
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    Re: Out of the box Assembly

    Lol I'm only 24 but I did have some tea.

    I'll get back at it in a little bit. I really press the fork down to ensure the QR is fully seated, and try to not to move the tire as I tighten the nut. I'll give it another try in a little bit.

  24. #49
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    Re: Out of the box Assembly

    In my case, my green Goblin's rear brake rubbed a bit when I first took delivery of the bike. Bleeding the system just a tad resolved the issue.

  25. #50
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    Out of the box Assembly-image.jpg
    Quote Originally Posted by trevor_b View Post
    Lol I'm only 24 but I did have some tea.

    I'll get back at it in a little bit. I really press the fork down to ensure the QR is fully seated, and try to not to move the tire as I tighten the nut. I'll give it another try in a little bit.
    I know it doesn't help you much but my front brake rubbing finally stopped. I did a combination of removing caliper and pads, depressing pistons and removing tire. Magically after trying all of this on a few separate occasions the rubbing stopped. When the rubbing stopped I carefully tightened down the caliper by alternately tightening the mounting bolts. So far so good.

    I did notice that ne of my pads looked like it was "missing" a bit of material which I thought was odd but it's working now so I am hesitant to futz with it anymore.

    (I attached a pic of my pads - sorta hard to tell but pad on left looked like a portion was missing.)

    Good luck! I am now learning about dérailleur tweaking.

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