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  1. #1
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    New Guy, Intro and Question

    Hi everyone. First post here. I've been lurking for several weeks trying to absorb as much info as possible, Thanks to everyone for your collective wisdom. I am now the proud owner of a Hobgoblin XO!
    Initially I thought I would get a Seeker, then moved up to the better specs on the Goblin. Then I decided my old legs would appreciate a Hobgoblin FS more. Then came the sale.....
    Needless to say, my wife was a little shell-shocked that I went from potentially spending $930 to spending $2500. At least it wasn't $3k.

    Prior to this, the most money I ever spent on a bike was $250. I am very happy with the choice though, and I haven't even ridden it yet. I have it all assembled now and I'm just waiting for the weather to improve. (although we are supposed to get more snow this weekend)
    I've researched as much as I can to ask as few annoying questions as possible. We can skip the SRAM vs Shimano, 26 vs 29, HT vs FS because I already bought the bike.

    Now here is the n00b question. "How much abuse can my Hobgoblin XO safely take?"
    The obvious answer is, "It depends."
    So I will qualify my question to hopefully make it easier to answer. I weight about 180#, so figure 200# with helmet, clothes, etc. The bike is 17". Right now I'm sure the bike can handle more than I can. As I improve in my skills, however, I want to be aware of what point I should be concerned more for my bike than my own health. I am talking mainly about damage to the frame and forks. Obviously a wheel or RD could go at any time. I do realize that this bike was not designed/intended for constant DH or even AM use.
    In other words, would I be ok with a regular diet of rock gardens and 3 foot drops?
    How about 4 feet? I assume with 100mm of travel repeated drops of anything more than 4 feet is risky.
    I hope to do some downhill at Highland Park this Summer Highland Mountain Bike Park but plan on renting for that.


    Next question is for Jeremy: The valve on the rear wheel came with the nut on it, but the valve on the front wheel did not have one. I assume there was no actual reason for this, right? Also, was there supposed to be an RD hanger in the box? I spoke with Eric on the phone prior to my order and asked about having a spare. I thought he said there would be one.

  2. #2
    Airborne Flight Crew
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    You've got the XO, arguably the best bike Airborne sells at the moment, Congrats!

    Well, I'll give the obvious answer first It's an XC bike. Hands down.

    Does that mean you cant meander off in to the rough? Of course not. The bike can probably handle more than the average XC rider/racer will dish out, but if you're going out to seek and shred the gnar, why use an XC bike...

    That said, my local terrain is pretty rough and technical. I'd say rougher than "average" whatever that may really be. And if I don't ride like a maniac and try to plow through, over and off everything, the Hobgoblin does great - I've cleaned some challenging tech lines on it that I have yet to clean on my 26, and it handle some pretty rough trail, just not at downhill power and velocity. It's a great bike for technical stuff if you have it, and and awesome bike for nice ribbons of single track that might be littered with roots and baby heads. It climbs like a clipped in goat, and it cruises at eye-watering speeds. But for missions where you seek and destroy the gnar: not the right tool for the job.

    3 and 4 foot drops: Not really in the Hobgoblin's back of tricks. I wouldn't recommend going there.

    DEFINITELY RENT for Highland The Hobgoblin would surely survive, but you'll have so much more fun on a gravity orientated bike.

    Welcome to the Airborne fold, can't wait for you to get to ride it! Be sure to post some photos and share your experience. The XO is a sweet ride!
    Airborne Flight Crew

    Jerry Hazard – website

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the reply. I certainly am not intending to go full speed over everything in my path, but just wanted to get an idea of what the bike's structural limitations might be. Probably not any real concern for the near future, but with the current weather, all I can do is dream.

  4. #4
    FKA Malibu412
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    You chose well. The Hobgob is a lot of bike and you will enjoy it.

    To add to what Jeremy said, yes it's a 100mm XC bike but that doesn't mean you can't get it off the ground a little. Getting the bike 3' or 4' in the air is no problem if the take off and landing transitions aren't extreme and you develop good technique. 3'-4' to flat might be a problem although I've landed my hard tails to flat with my legs as suspension absorbing most of the impact. A 1'-2' step down or the occasional stump jump shouldn't be a problem. If you feel the suspension bottoming, check your setup and if it's fine, back off the air time a little and/or work on technique.

    Have fun.
    "I love the bike. It's my meditation. I think I'm bike-sexual." -Robin Williams

  5. #5
    Airborne Flight Crew
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chipperman View Post
    Thanks for the reply. I certainly am not intending to go full speed over everything in my path, but just wanted to get an idea of what the bike's structural limitations might be. Probably not any real concern for the near future, but with the current weather, all I can do is dream.

    Right on, I think the bike will treat you very well!

    Pretty soon the days start getting longer...
    Airborne Flight Crew

    Jerry Hazard – website

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glide the Clyde View Post
    If you feel the suspension bottoming, check your setup and if it's fine, back off the air time a little and/or work on technique.

    Have fun.
    Thanks for the reply. You bring up an interesting point there. Let's assume my suspension it set up properly. If I take a drop and the suspension does Not bottom out does that likely mean I can do drops like that repeatedly without fear for the bike?

    I'm probably obsessing over nothing here...

  7. #7
    FKA Malibu412
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    Technique is still critical even if you are avoiding bottoming. Your body suspension is more important than the bike suspension as the technical level increases. You can stress a frame even if you're not hitting the suspension stops.

    Since the FS thing is new ground for you, start smaller and reasonable, work on fundamental bike skills and work up as you get more comfortable and proficient.
    "I love the bike. It's my meditation. I think I'm bike-sexual." -Robin Williams

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glide the Clyde View Post
    Since the FS thing is new ground for you, start smaller and reasonable, work on fundamental bike skills and work up as you get more comfortable and proficient.
    Well, the $79 Target special I've been riding for the past year is technically FS, but I know what you mean.

    "You can stress a frame even if you're not hitting the suspension stops."
    Good to know, thanks

  9. #9
    FKA Malibu412
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chipperman View Post
    Well, the $79 Target special I've been riding for the past year is technically FS
    It is? And it made it a year??
    "I love the bike. It's my meditation. I think I'm bike-sexual." -Robin Williams

  10. #10
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    I just wanted to say, welcome to the family!

    I also live in the northeast (though not technically New England, but close) and riding right now is pretty amazing. I ride in VT quite a bit and the snow isn't even as slick as if the trails are wet. Of course, who knows how much snow we're about to get, so that might change, but if you are so inclined, don't be afraid to ride in the white stuff. Congratulations on an amazing bike!
    Eric

  11. #11
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    OK, funny story there. Two years ago my wife and I each bought the El Cheapo Deluxe bikes at Target. Mine was a black stunner for $89 and hers was grey and green for $79. This summer we were on Cape Cod and my kids were riding the bikes. One of my sons had my bike and just sort of fell over while standing on the side of the rode. The bike fell into my other son and knocked him over as well. They pulled themselves up and walked the bikes back to the house. The next day I went to ride my bike and found that the crank was bent. The chain would actually go from the large ring to the small and back with every turn of the crank! The funniest part was that the chain never dropped. I actually could ride it like that, although it was kind of awkward going from high to low range and back with every turn of the pedals. I took a sledge to it trying to pound it back straight, but to no avail. So I started riding my Wife's bike instead. The grip shifts do not work very well (SRAM Max with Golden-Sun derailleurs), but the bike otherwise functions ok. So that's what started my "need" for a new bike. So in a way, I should thank my son for crashing my bike this summer, because otherwise I would not have a brand new Hobgoblin XO right now.

  12. #12
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    Hi skyphix,
    Yeah, the forecast keeps going up. They're talking about up to 10 inches now. I think that's a little deep for trail riding. Maybe I need to get a Fat Bike now….

    OMG, the sickness has begun!! I haven't even ridden my new bike, and I'm already talking about another one.

  13. #13
    FKA Malibu412
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chipperman View Post
    OMG, the sickness has begun!! I haven't even ridden my new bike, and I'm already talking about another one.
    Now that made me laugh! Plus rep for you.
    "I love the bike. It's my meditation. I think I'm bike-sexual." -Robin Williams

  14. #14
    Airborne Product Dude
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chipperman View Post
    Hi everyone. First post here. I've been lurking for several weeks trying to absorb as much info as possible, Thanks to everyone for your collective wisdom. I am now the proud owner of a Hobgoblin XO!
    Initially I thought I would get a Seeker, then moved up to the better specs on the Goblin. Then I decided my old legs would appreciate a Hobgoblin FS more. Then came the sale.....
    Needless to say, my wife was a little shell-shocked that I went from potentially spending $930 to spending $2500. At least it wasn't $3k.

    Prior to this, the most money I ever spent on a bike was $250. I am very happy with the choice though, and I haven't even ridden it yet. I have it all assembled now and I'm just waiting for the weather to improve. (although we are supposed to get more snow this weekend)
    I've researched as much as I can to ask as few annoying questions as possible. We can skip the SRAM vs Shimano, 26 vs 29, HT vs FS because I already bought the bike.

    Now here is the n00b question. "How much abuse can my Hobgoblin XO safely take?"
    The obvious answer is, "It depends."
    So I will qualify my question to hopefully make it easier to answer. I weight about 180#, so figure 200# with helmet, clothes, etc. The bike is 17". Right now I'm sure the bike can handle more than I can. As I improve in my skills, however, I want to be aware of what point I should be concerned more for my bike than my own health. I am talking mainly about damage to the frame and forks. Obviously a wheel or RD could go at any time. I do realize that this bike was not designed/intended for constant DH or even AM use.
    In other words, would I be ok with a regular diet of rock gardens and 3 foot drops?
    How about 4 feet? I assume with 100mm of travel repeated drops of anything more than 4 feet is risky.
    I hope to do some downhill at Highland Park this Summer Highland Mountain Bike Park but plan on renting for that..
    Hey, thanks for your purchase!

    OK, like others have said here its a cross-country 29er. It's not really intended for any drops to flat. Its meant to have both wheels on the ground and getting from point A to point B as fast and efficiently as possible. The shock, fork, frame, and wheels are not intended for any sort of drops like that. Truthfully something like that is really best suited to a beefy 6-inch travel all-mountain type bike.


    Quote Originally Posted by Chipperman View Post
    Next question is for Jeremy: The valve on the rear wheel came with the nut on it, but the valve on the front wheel did not have one. I assume there was no actual reason for this, right? Also, was there supposed to be an RD hanger in the box? I spoke with Eric on the phone prior to my order and asked about having a spare. I thought he said there would be one.
    The nut on the valve stems is generally a throw-away piece along with the black stem cap. It's not needed. It may have fallen off in shipping in the box so be certain you check the bottom of the box if you want it.

    RD hangers ship separately from the location the bike ships from. All hangers, rebuild kits, etc are kept here at our World HQ in Ohio and we send them out from here. The bikes don't standardly come with an extra hanger. If ordered one extra and have not yet received, please give me your order# and we will check on it for you to see where it is.

    Thanks again!

    Jeremy
    Airborne Dude.

  15. #15
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    OK Thanks.

  16. #16
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    Here it is, impatiently waiting for the snow to melt.

  17. #17
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    Before I got a six inch travel bike I had a bike similar in travel to the Hob Goblin..it was a FS XC bike..i started pushing the limits on the bike and and initially it held up fine..but the stress it put on the frame and pivot points took a toll on it...the front fork suffered as well..was a decent bike with good stuff on it..just was not built for hucking and slinging around...nice looking bike you got.

  18. #18
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    Thanks.
    I'll try not to push it too hard.

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