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  1. #151
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoWolfpack View Post
    Hey riders....I purchased my New Gobling in 20" and like it a lot. I am 6-1 and 190 lbs. Maybe could have gone with the 18" but after riding other 18" hardtails---felt that would be too small.

    Nonetheless, I am looking to upgrade the seatpost and handlebar to carbon? Any suggestions as I am new to the carbon world! Thanks much in advance.
    At 6'1", unless you have some odd body proportions I would have recommended a 20" so I definitely think you bought the correct size. I'm the same height and that's the size Goblin that I ride.

    I've been digging the FSA SLK carbon stuff lately. I've been riding their seatpost and low-rise riser bars and love them. The bend on the bars is perfect and made this old-school flat-bar guy a believer in low-rise riser bars. They also make them in flat format as well.

    I'm thinking about a lighter/wider bar, and a lighter seatpost... Probably a Thomson Elite because I like their clamping mechanism and they look really nice.

    The one question I have is, is the stock Goblin seatpost considered a 'setback' post and if so, how much is the setback? I measured ~2 cm, so, if I want the same geometry, do I go with a 20 mm setback post? This is probably totally obvious, but I just want to make sure I'm not missing something.
    Yep, that's what you would want to buy, the 20mm setback Thomson post. I also like Thomson stuff a lot; I've got their 410mm post on my personal HobGoblin and its been bullet-proof. I like how they butted the post (more material in the front and back and less on the sides). And honestly the alu Thomson post is about as light as many cheaper carbon posts on the market. The only thing it doesn't do as well as a carbon post is damp vibrations, but for a lot of folks that isn't what they are looking for anyway.

    Hope that helps!

    Jeremy
    Please Note: I no longer work for Airborne. If you have an Airborne question or problem please contact them directly.

  2. #152
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyFlyer View Post
    Yep, that's what you would want to buy, the 20mm setback Thomson post. I also like Thomson stuff a lot; I've got their 410mm post on my personal HobGoblin and its been bullet-proof. I like how they butted the post (more material in the front and back and less on the sides). And honestly the alu Thomson post is about as light as many cheaper carbon posts on the market. The only thing it doesn't do as well as a carbon post is damp vibrations, but for a lot of folks that isn't what they are looking for anyway.

    Hope that helps!

    Jeremy
    As always, very helpful. Thanks Jeremy! Yeah, the aluminum Thomson posts are very light. I'll be picking up one of those posts in the near future... First things first... I have a set of Mavic Crossride ST wheels on order for my Goblin that I'm really stoked about. I'll be sure to post a pic on the modified Airborne bikes thread once they're on.

  3. #153
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    I'm assuming there won't be pedals with the Goblin XO; recommend a good platform pedal for it?

  4. #154
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    I like my Wellgo MG-1's. Can be found for about $40 online and they're really grippy and light. I think the green ones would look awesome on the Goblin XO. Or the gold ones if you want to accent the XO bits.

  5. #155
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    I have some white MG-1s on my green Goblin and they're smooth and grippy.

  6. #156
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    Deity Compounds and HT Nano P - both plastic bodies, metal pins, around 340 grams and totally rebuildable. Great traction, and not too much $$$ for a decent platform/flat.
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  7. #157
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    Anybody know if the Geax AKA tires on my goblin are compatible with Stans ZTR Crest tubeless wheels?

  8. #158
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    Quote Originally Posted by ElDuderino2412 View Post
    Anybody know if the Geax AKA tires on my goblin are compatible with Stans ZTR Crest tubeless wheels?
    They should I used them on my Black Flag wheels pretty much same set up as the Stans...no problems at all

  9. #159
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    Quote Originally Posted by TXTony View Post
    They should I used them on my Black Flag wheels pretty much same set up as the Stans...no problems at all
    +1 I ride Charger Pros with AKAs, no problem, they are Stans BST type wheels too.

  10. #160
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    Quote Originally Posted by TXTony View Post
    They should I used them on my Black Flag wheels pretty much same set up as the Stans...no problems at all
    Quote Originally Posted by swildnm View Post
    +1 I ride Charger Pros with AKAs, no problem, they are Stans BST type wheels too.
    Thanks, looked like they were according to Stan's site. Just wanted to make sure.

  11. #161
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    So this weekend I put on a carbon handlebar I purchased from Nashbar:

    Nashbar CF-250 Carbon Riser Bars - Normal Shipping Ground[Ljava.lang.String;@2ad12ad1#ReviewHeader

    It made a nice difference of the standard handlebar and I like the low rise of it. I am 6-1 and love my Large (20") size Goblin, but wondered if it was a tad too big. After installing the low rise bar AND moving the saddle rails forward in the seatpost, I see a big difference. Very happy now.

    I am now looking for a carbon seatpost. Thanks everybody for ideas and opinions.

  12. #162
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    Just thought i would let future Goblin owners know what they could face if left untouched. Real bad cable rub on my nice fork.This was about after a weeks worth of riding. I read about the cables being cut to long, but thought it would be fine. Well i re-routed and shortened both shifter cables and set them up so they route to the opposite side of the frame like my Trek. The hydraulic lines seem to be fine. Had to touch up the spots with black nail polish.




  13. #163
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greenkeep View Post
    Just thought i would let future Goblin owners know what they could face if left untouched. Real bad cable rub on my nice fork.This was about after a weeks worth of riding. I read about the cables being cut to long, but thought it would be fine. Well i re-routed and shortened both shifter cables and set them up so they route to the opposite side of the frame like my Trek. The hydraulic lines seem to be fine. Had to touch up the spots with black nail polish.
    Can you show us a picture of what you mean by routing to the opposite side of the frame? I'm fighting this too.

  14. #164
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    If you look at your bike from the front you will notice that the shifter cables are routed down the the same side of the frame. This is causing excessive rubbing. What you want to do is criss-cross the cables. Looking from the front-

    Left shifter to right side of frame
    Right Shifter to left side of frame

    You should start by adjusting your brake levers and shifter to exactly where you like them first. Then disconnect the shifter cables at the front and rear derailleure by loosening the securing bolts. Remove the cables. You will then need to remove a little excess length (approx 2.5 in) from each of the shifter cable closest the shifter (the longer ones). The smaller sections toward the rear need just a touch nipped off. I also used a couple pieces of clear packing tape where the cables hit the head tube and where the top and down tube are. The goal is to leave just enough slack so the handle bars can do a full 180 (just in case of accidents). I will post some pics soon
    Last edited by Greenkeep; 01-14-2013 at 03:50 PM.

  15. #165
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greenkeep View Post
    If you look at your bike from the front you will notice that the shifter cables are routed down the the same side of the frame. This if causing excessive rubbing. What you want to do is criss-cross the cables. Looking from the front-

    Left shifter to right side of frame
    Right Shifter to left side of frame

    You should start by adjusting your brake levers and shifter to exactly where you like them first. Then disconnect the shifter cables at the front and rear derailleure by loosening the securing bolts. Remove the cables. You will then need to remove a little excess length (approx 2.5 in) from each of the shifter cable closest the shifter (the longer ones). The smaller sections toward the rear need just a touch nipped off. I also used a couple pieces of clear packing tape where the cables hit the head tube and where the top and down tube are. The goal is to leave just enough slack so the handle bars can do a full 180 (just in case of accidents). I will post some pics soon
    Thanks. I'll try that.

  16. #166
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    When u cut the excess it gives a cleaner look and keeps the cable off the shock. My Trek had really good routing so i used that as my guide. What they did made sense and minimizes wear on the frame. The brake lines are a little long but will do. They are not as big an issue as the two shift cables. Don' forget to cut off the excess cable at the derailleur's. Airborne should have supplied you with two butt ends to terminate the bare wire with your bike. Hope this helps.





  17. #167
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    Thanks again. I've got a cable cutter on order. Then I'll launch into doing the same.

    Looks a lot cleaner too, by the way.

  18. #168
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    I think I've adressed the "long" cables on here before, but in case someone missed it:

    The cables are the length they are based on the length needed if someone runs a long, positive stem in the upward position, also allowing for the bars to spin 180degrees in a crash without kinking the cable. What we don't want is a customer to buy a bike with cables too short for their needed fit set-up or style.

    Every size has different length cable sets due to different TT, and in the case of the XL size, HT lengths.

    Thanks.
    Please Note: I no longer work for Airborne. If you have an Airborne question or problem please contact them directly.

  19. #169
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    Thanks Jeremy, but i will have to say even with a 120mm stem with a steep rise the cables would still be excessive. Aside from that the routing of the cables are incorrect. Not a big deal but left uncorrected the result will be like my pics above. Great bike none the less!

  20. #170
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    Thanks for your kind words about the bike!

    I have to respectfully disagree on the cable routing. If the cables were routed the way that you would like, they would cross each other at the hydro cable and there will be extra friction in the system. It is not the recommended routing, and doubtful that your Trek was routed that way at the factory.

    More than likely your shop did that prior to purchase, as that is an old-school roadbike shift cable routing trick. However the roadbikes don't have a hydro cable running between them on the DT.

    I hope that makes sense.

    It's a no-win situation on the cable lengths. If we made them the length you want, someone would complain that they are too short when they put a long upward stem and wide riser bars on their bike. Better to put a little extra on there and let people personalize their lengths if they see fit.

    Jeremy
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  21. #171
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    Not to beat a dead horse(well maybe,ahah) The stock cable routing has both the rear hydro and rear derailleur lines going down the same side of the frame. Right away they are pushed against (quite firmly) the top portion of the fork. Each turn of the handle bars creates friction, so much so that the cables were actually cutting into the aluminum. Even if you kept the routing the same and changed over to a higher rise stem it would still hit because of excess cable. My daughters Trek is routed like the Goblin and it works in that bikes case because the handle bar has a very large rise allowing enough room for the cable to make the bend leaving enough room without touching the head tube much. Also the cable retainers on her bike are on the upper side portion of the down tube, not directly under the head tube at the crotch like on the Goblin.

    The front hydro line is ok and is not really an issue despite IMO being a little to long as well. The issue's are really just the other three lines. I think leaving the extra room is a great idea so you will not be limited when customizing the bike to your liking but i also think that the cable length is to long for the bike as it stands stock. Might be worth noting to customers that modification might be necessary and explain. Also i feel the added length may also be needed for shipping purposes(just an idea)The bike is beautiful and the last thing you want to see is damage like my above pictures with very little use. The fork alone is 400+.

    Also as side note, think about this if the cable is curved 180 degrees going down the same side of the frame every turn of the handlebar in the same direction will send the cable or cables into the head tube. Opposite routing will allow the cables to hang freely and when turning in the opposite direction will give room for the cable and push it out away from the frame and gently graze the head tube turning in the same direction. Just a thought
    Last edited by Greenkeep; 01-15-2013 at 04:07 PM.

  22. #172
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    When we shuttle and ride parks on the DH bikes, the frames are subject to a similar sort of wear by consistent rubbing (racks on the lifts, tailgate bed, etc.). Frames are subject to all kinds of wear, cables or whatever. Look where the cables go inside the frame - anywhere where there is brief contact, there will be wear over time - regardless of cable routing.

    Lizard Skins makes a vinyl patches in various sizes that are great for protecting frames/parts from this very issue. We use it on our DH bikes to protect from wear as mentioned - I'm sure you can get off-brands, or even some other vinyl or poly-plastic thing sold for a completely different use. Using in on my Hobgoblin this week.

    Try here: Lizardstore
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  23. #173
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    Quote Originally Posted by jhazard View Post
    When we shuttle and ride parks on the DH bikes, the frames are subject to a similar sort of wear by consistent rubbing (racks on the lifts, tailgate bed, etc.). Frames are subject to all kinds of wear, cables or whatever. Look where the cables go inside the frame - anywhere where there is brief contact, there will be wear over time - regardless of cable routing.

    Lizard Skins makes a vinyl patches in various sizes that are great for protecting frames/parts from this very issue. We use it on our DH bikes to protect from wear as mentioned - I'm sure you can get off-brands, or even some other vinyl or poly-plastic thing sold for a completely different use. Using in on my Hobgoblin this week.

    Try here: Lizardstore
    Understood, yes this is normal for bikes. I have had several bikes and this was the first time i noticed anything like this. The cables were actually cutting into the fork, the lines almost lost enough insulation exposing the wire in the cable housing. On top of that the hydro line could have burst as well or leaked. This is not normal wear but poor routing and I have had the bike only week. I'm not trying to be a PITA, just trying to help make a great product that much better.
    Last edited by Greenkeep; 01-15-2013 at 06:54 PM.

  24. #174
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greenkeep View Post
    When u cut the excess it gives a cleaner look and keeps the cable off the shock. My Trek had really good routing so i used that as my guide. What they did made sense and minimizes wear on the frame. The brake lines are a little long but will do. They are not as big an issue as the two shift cables. Don' forget to cut off the excess cable at the derailleur's. Airborne should have supplied you with two butt ends to terminate the bare wire with your bike. Hope this helps.




    FWIW, I have two Goblin's (Green and the new one) and set the Green up that way after fighting with it for a while, but it's been that way for nearly a year. The new Goblin has been set up that why from day one and I was a pre-order for those. I've had no problems and it actually shifts better than it did stock.

    I certainly understand no being able to please everyone, but I would expect it to match up more closely stock. It's not a big deal to me as by the second go round, I chucked the stock cables during the inital setup, but not everyone would consider shortening them part of the out of box setup. Unless someone is looking mount the shifters on a set of tri bars, lopping a few inches off of all the cables makes the most sense.
    There's only one bigger sheep than manufacturer's - consumers! - AndrewTO

  25. #175
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    Thanks for the input.
    Please Note: I no longer work for Airborne. If you have an Airborne question or problem please contact them directly.

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    BDF, absolutely no offense intended. You know you guys rock and if it was raining money, someone would complain theirs was dirty.

    Greenkeep, after reading this again this morning while less tired, I wanted to clarify. I do NOT have the bare shift cables crossing under the top tube. I have the housing going to their original locations and the housings crossing right behind the head tube.
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  27. #177
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    Quote Originally Posted by TreeKiller View Post
    BDF, absolutely no offense intended. You know you guys rock and if it was raining money, someone would complain theirs was dirty.

    Greenkeep, after reading this again this morning while less tired, I wanted to clarify. I do NOT have the bare shift cables crossing under the top tube. I have the housing going to their original locations and the housings crossing right behind the head tube.
    Same here, here is some links for some better pics of what i actually did just so there is no confusion.

    BTW-The hydro line is not touching the fork(just looks like it, it's suspended in air)

    http://imageshack.us/a/img832/4272/img0899om.jpg
    http://imageshack.us/a/img801/3173/img0900ja.jpg
    http://imageshack.us/a/img688/7636/img0901vy.jpg
    http://imageshack.us/a/img233/3374/img0902ix.jpg
    http://imageshack.us/a/img12/9571/img0903yl.jpg
    http://imageshack.us/a/img268/1030/img0904m.jpg
    http://imageshack.us/a/img850/2785/img0905jwy.jpg
    http://imageshack.us/a/img22/5590/img0898di.jpg
    Last edited by Greenkeep; 01-16-2013 at 06:45 AM.

  28. #178
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    Greenkeep,lovin your Goblin! Seems like an AWESOME deal. I have a 2013 Stumpjumper FSR Comp 29 but really want a hard tail again. I have my eye on this one but no funds currently. I figure if I pester the wife long enough she'll give in Enjoy the ride

  29. #179
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    Hey guys,
    So I just bought a new 20" black goblin and I'm loving it so far. So much nicer than my hardrock sport disc 29er! Anyways, I feel like the frame is a bit too large for me. The standover height is fine, I have about an inch of clearance to my crotch, but I feel like my arms a little far away and stretched out. I moved the seat all the way forward (while still angling flat), but its not enough.

    I was thinking about buying a new stem. It came with a 105mm stem, I was thinking of an 80 or 90 mm. What do you guys think? I'm 6' and 180-185 lbs.

    This ok: Easton EA50 Stem 2011 at Price Point ?

  30. #180
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    Quote Originally Posted by stuppie View Post
    Hey guys,
    So I just bought a new 20" black goblin and I'm loving it so far. So much nicer than my hardrock sport disc 29er! Anyways, I feel like the frame is a bit too large for me. The standover height is fine, I have about an inch of clearance to my crotch, but I feel like my arms a little far away and stretched out. I moved the seat all the way forward (while still angling flat), but its not enough.

    I was thinking about buying a new stem. It came with a 105mm stem, I was thinking of an 80 or 90 mm. What do you guys think? I'm 6' and 180-185 lbs.

    This ok: Easton EA50 Stem 2011 at Price Point ?
    That stem should work fine and at a pretty good price. If you want more bling after you are sure of the size you could always replace it. FWIW, I'm 5'10.11 and ride a 20" Goblin and just went to an 80mm stem. 20mm was noticable but not dramatic. I rode it with a 100mm stem for year but my back started bothering me on rides over 2 hrs.
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  31. #181
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    Do both of you wish you had gone with the 18" frame?

    A while back I posted my measurements and I think Jeremy recommended the 18" (I'm 6' as well), I was thinking I would need the 20" as well but he had me second guessing. I'm still a couple months away from buying so I guess I'll have everything figured out by then.

  32. #182
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    Quote Originally Posted by panicstop View Post
    Greenkeep,lovin your Goblin! Seems like an AWESOME deal. I have a 2013 Stumpjumper FSR Comp 29 but really want a hard tail again. I have my eye on this one but no funds currently. I figure if I pester the wife long enough she'll give in Enjoy the ride
    Thanks, you will really enjoy the bike. It rides real nice, going out today after all the rain here in NY for a 13.5 mile trail ride.

    Also on a side note: I re-did the tubeless conversion because i realized my tires were not seated evenly on the rim using Stan's strips.I just went with Gorilla tape and American Classic Stems. Beads popped in nice and rides much better. If you go with the strips you will have to build up the rim channel on the WTB i19 rim due to its depth. Might have to use foam weatherstripping.

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    Is there a link I can read about this gorilla tape method? Or is it just replacing stans tape with gorilla tape?

  34. #184
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    Quote Originally Posted by trevor_b View Post
    Do both of you wish you had gone with the 18" frame?

    A while back I posted my measurements and I think Jeremy recommended the 18" (I'm 6' as well), I was thinking I would need the 20" as well but he had me second guessing. I'm still a couple months away from buying so I guess I'll have everything figured out by then.
    I am glad I didn't go with an 18. I have had 18/18.5" bikes in the past and prefer a larger bike. However, it's not all about how tall you are. I'm ~5' 10" and my son is ~6' 2" but have the exact same leg length. This should push me even more to an 18" but I've never been able to get comfortable on that size. It's so subjective that I would go sit on a couple of comparable bikes of each size and see what feels best.
    There's only one bigger sheep than manufacturer's - consumers! - AndrewTO

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    Quote Originally Posted by TreeKiller View Post
    I am glad I didn't go with an 18. I have had 18/18.5" bikes in the past and prefer a larger bike. However, it's not all about how tall you are. I'm ~5' 10" and my son is ~6' 2" but have the exact same leg length. This should push me even more to an 18" but I've never been able to get comfortable on that size. It's so subjective that I would go sit on a couple of comparable bikes of each size and see what feels best.
    My inseam is 34", using the multiply by .67 and subtract 4 formula this puts me at a 19" frame. My arms are a little longer than most people's so I went with the 20" frame instead of the 18". I've only ridden once, and I felt a little stretched out. I ordered an 80 mm stem today, so I'm hoping that solves the problem. I'll reserve final judgement until it gets here and I try it out, but I think I would've felt cramped on an 18" and I'd rather have a shorter stem than longer.

  36. #186
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    Quote Originally Posted by trevor_b View Post
    Is there a link I can read about this gorilla tape method? Or is it just replacing stans tape with gorilla tape?
    gorilla tape tubless - Bing

  37. #187
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    Quote Originally Posted by stuppie View Post
    My inseam is 34", using the multiply by .67 and subtract 4 formula this puts me at a 19" frame. My arms are a little longer than most people's so I went with the 20" frame instead of the 18". I've only ridden once, and I felt a little stretched out. I ordered an 80 mm stem today, so I'm hoping that solves the problem. I'll reserve final judgement until it gets here and I try it out, but I think I would've felt cramped on an 18" and I'd rather have a shorter stem than longer.
    Lol. Now I'm rethinking what frame I will be getting. I was set on the 18 now im thinking 20. I'm 6' with a 34" inseam also.

    Any ideas on comparable bikes that I could get on? There's a specialized dealer in town and I was thinking the carve comp would be a good one. Any others?

  38. #188
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    Trevor, where are you located? Are you close to us?
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    Jeremy, not close to you guys. I'm in Texas, just north of Austin.

  40. #190
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    Quote Originally Posted by trevor_b View Post
    Jeremy, not close to you guys. I'm in Texas, just north of Austin.
    Trevor if you ever head up to the Fort Worth area PM me...I have a 18 inch Goblin you can check out to see how the fit is...I am 5'11.

  41. #191
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    Trevor, if you make it down to SA I have a 20" you can take for a spin.

    Never mind... It's a 22"

  42. #192
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    Quote Originally Posted by TXTony View Post
    Trevor if you ever head up to the Fort Worth area PM me...I have a 18 inch Goblin you can check out to see how the fit is...I am 5'11.
    OK, thanks. What's your inseam? Normal length legs and arms for your height?

  43. #193
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    Never measured my arms...inseam is 34...I am one of those that can ride a med or large frame...I prefer med frame bikes vs large..I have 4 other mountain bikes and they are all med frame bikes...I usually run a 90mm stem except my all mountain rig where I am running a 70mm stem..

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    What's your reasoning behind riding medium vs large frames? Able to maneuver better?

  45. #195
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    Quote Originally Posted by trevor_b View Post
    What's your reasoning behind riding medium vs large frames? Able to maneuver better?
    Yep...even though I could ride a large the med fits me better as far as 26ers go...the Goblin is my first 29er and I can tell from the fit of this bike that the next size up would have been to big...but when I got my Moto (26er six inch travel bike) I could have rode either but liked how I could toss around the medium one better...so it pretty much came down to personal preference as to what I like and how I am going to ride that particular bike.

  46. #196
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    Tony, do you do any long riding on rocky/technical terrain? The trail closest to my house is a 26 mile loop that's fairly rocky and technical. I just want to make sure I'm comfortable and don't get lower back pain if I were to do the whole loop. I also go to a trail that is pretty much fast and flowy single track though so the right size bike would be ideal for handling that diversity if possible.

  47. #197
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    Quote Originally Posted by trevor_b View Post
    Tony, do you do any long riding on rocky/technical terrain? The trail closest to my house is a 26 mile loop that's fairly rocky and technical. I just want to make sure I'm comfortable and don't get lower back pain if I were to do the whole loop. I also go to a trail that is pretty much fast and flowy single track though so the right size bike would be ideal for handling that diversity if possible.

    Yep we ride a variety of trails up here...and some long rides on the bike...it really shines on flowy hard pack type trails...have done a few rides on it that are near 30 miles...I will say as far as techy stuff any hard tail 26 or 29er is gonna be a little rougher than a full susp. rig...I have a buddy up here who rides a 18 Goblin as well and he has no issues either on the rocky stuff...but to be honest when the trails get rough I grab my FS rig..my buddy is 5 feet 11 also and rides a 18 inch as well..I also prefer the handling of a med frame vs a large frame for a person my height...but that is strictly personal preference...I know guys shorter than me who prefer large frames and ride them great...I think find a few 29er HTs and just sit on them and see how they feel..the geo may not be exact but it will give you an idea at least...I will say the Goblin has been one of the best bike purchases I have made in a while and as soon as I see the new Taka or replacement for it I may scoop one of those up...

  48. #198
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    Just ordered a set of these: Wellgo MG 1 Magnesium Pedals MTB DH BMX Flat Cage Green | eBay I know it's a popular pedal but I haven't seen them in green before. The green looks like a perfect match for the green on my black Goblin. Anyone else using them?

  49. #199
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeinMinn View Post
    Just ordered a set of these: Wellgo MG 1 Magnesium Pedals MTB DH BMX Flat Cage Green | eBay I know it's a popular pedal but I haven't seen them in green before. The green looks like a perfect match for the green on my black Goblin. Anyone else using them?
    I used to have a set of white ones that I loved but I loaned them to a friend for a DH run last year and he smacked a rock with one....and it basically exploded into several pieces.

    I realize that they aren't intended for DH so take that for what its worth. Probably for normal XC riding they are prefectly fine. They are nice and light and the pins offer a lot of grip.

    Jeremy
    Please Note: I no longer work for Airborne. If you have an Airborne question or problem please contact them directly.

  50. #200
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyFlyer View Post
    I used to have a set of white ones that I loved but I loaned them to a friend for a DH run last year and he smacked a rock with one....and it basically exploded into several pieces.

    I realize that they aren't intended for DH so take that for what its worth. Probably for normal XC riding they are prefectly fine. They are nice and light and the pins offer a lot of grip.

    Jeremy
    Yeah, I had heard that about them. Getting a titanium spindle makes them even more delicate. But they are pretty cheap to replace compared to some of the other options out there. Plus, if I'm doing some DH, I'll just bolt on some of my other pedals. I really just wanted a fairly light pedal for XC that was pinned and came in the right color. This seems to fit the bill. We'll see...

    What pedals do you run now BDF?
    Last edited by MikeinMinn; 01-23-2013 at 09:23 AM.

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