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  1. #1
    Airborne Product Dude
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    Introducing the Airborne Toxin

    We've been working on this one for a long while. It's finally done!

    Airborne Bicycles. Toxin

    Its no secret that most of us at Airborne got our start in mountainbiking as cross-country riders. And while its still our mainstay, we've been bitten in recent years by the almighty gravity bug. We've found that the time we spend riding downhill actually makes us better cross-crountry riders.

    With the ongoing trend of ski resorts building gravity parks for mountainbikers to ride in the warm months, there has never been a better time to be a gravity rider.

    It's one thing to ride a rental bike when you go to the local gravity park. Its another to be able to bring your own bike and ride what you are used to riding. It makes things much more enjoyable and you become a more confident rider as your skills progress. With that in mind, we set out to build a park/resort bike that wouldn't break the bank.

    The Toxin is a 7" travel, single-crown gravity park bike that is ready to shred, right out of the box. Its built around a stout 6061-T6 Aluminum frame with a modified single-pivot suspension and equipped with a RockShox Domain and KageR. SRAM's X5 workhorse group takes care of the shifting duties, and braking is handled by Elixir 3's mated to 200mm rotors front and rear. A sealed-hub Alex FR32 DH wheelset shod with Maxxis DHF 2.5 tires front and rear makes for durable and capable rolling stock. Lastly we used a full KORE cockpit; bars, stem, post, seat, and even pedals. All of that in a great-looking package for only $1749.


    Jeremy
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Introducing the Airborne Toxin-toxin_side_profile.jpg  

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  2. #2
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    Great looking rig!
    Money doesn't buy happiness, but you can buy a bike, and that is pretty close.

  3. #3
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    Might have to get one of those if we get a lift down in Tucson.....

  4. #4
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    Sold! ...if only I had somewhere to ride it.

  5. #5
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    Great entry level gravity bike.

  6. #6
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    Any guess at a ballpark weight?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by jdhunt0 View Post
    Any guess at a ballpark weight?
    Any bets?

    I going with about 40lbs.

  8. #8
    Airborne Product Dude
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    37.5lbs average weight.


    Jeremy
    Airborne Dude.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyFlyer View Post
    37.5lbs average weight.


    Jeremy
    You filled the frame with helium, right?

    Seriously, that is an amazing weight to price ratio. Not that weight is everything in a gravity bike, but below 38lbs is pretty expensive territory in this type of bike. Kudos!

    Edit: I guess that weight is pretty similar to the $2600 Spec. Status 1. Was thinking of bikes with dual crown forks.
    Last edited by MikeinMinn; 01-17-2014 at 04:52 PM.

  10. #10
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    So Airborne has a complete DH rig for $1700, thats more in line with their business model and I think its awesome. The $1700 frame on the other hand...

  11. #11
    Airborne Product Dude
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    Quote Originally Posted by musikron View Post
    So Airborne has a complete DH rig for $1700, thats more in line with their business model and I think its awesome. The $1700 frame on the other hand...
    Its a 7inch freeriide/park bike, not a dual crown dh rig.

    See the "How do you feel aboout the cost of the Pathogen" thread on this sub-forum in regards to why it is what it is. Its still a storming value and a great frameset. If its too much for you....don't buy it. Simple.

    Thanks for your input,

    Jeremy
    Airborne Dude.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
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    Smack...hit that one out of the park! Awesome looking bike!

  13. #13
    Dudette
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    Any geo #s yet? Beautiful looking rig and just might be the ticket for me if it comes small enough (5'5" with 29.5" inseam).
    MTB4Her.com

  14. #14
    Dudette
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    Quote Originally Posted by petey15 View Post
    Any geo #s yet? Beautiful looking rig and just might be the ticket for me if it comes small enough (5'5" with 29.5" inseam).
    Whoops- just checked out the site. Was hoping the standover on a small would have been lower. I like everything else about the bike, especially the price, as someone who is just starting to get into some park riding.
    MTB4Her.com

  15. #15
    Airborne Flight Crew
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    HOME RUN. Love it.
    Airborne Flight Crew

    Jerry Hazard website

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyFlyer View Post
    Its a 7inch freeriide/park bike, not a dual crown dh rig.

    See the "How do you feel aboout the cost of the Pathogen" thread on this sub-forum in regards to why it is what it is. Its still a storming value and a great frameset. If its too much for you....don't buy it. Simple.

    Thanks for your input,

    Jeremy
    Eh, bikes are bikes, this whole sub-division thing is getting out of hand in my opinion. Next we'll have bikes that only turn left!

    But I see value in this frame where the pathogen appears to be an experiment in how much you can get away with charging for something. Its still a mass produced, foreign made product any way you shake it. I'm just glad you guys haven't completely abandoned what you are about, value. I'd like an Airborne as my next bike I think,but not if I can walk into the LBS and get a better deal.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by musikron View Post
    Eh, bikes are bikes, this whole sub-division thing is getting out of hand in my opinion. Next we'll have bikes that only turn left!

    But I see value in this frame where the pathogen appears to be an experiment in how much you can get away with charging for something. Its still a mass produced, foreign made product any way you shake it. I'm just glad you guys haven't completely abandoned what you are about, value. I'd like an Airborne as my next bike I think,but not if I can walk into the LBS and get a better deal.
    Well, maybe that's true for you and definitely me. At my skill level a bike is a bike. But at a competition level, distinction matters. There is a clear difference between a dual crown and single crown fork. There is a difference in the aggressiveness of the frame construction. There is a difference in the suspension travel and stiffness. Maybe you should take your commentary over to a DH forum and see if the ones who actually ride them feel that there is a difference.

    As for your continuing comments on the Pathogen, you might consider providing something other than the repetition of debunked arguments and personal suspicions as a basis. Or, perhaps, you might go out and find a company selling a frame in this category for less. Or you could try to start your own company and see if you can build and sell them for less.

    Whatever...but your redundant attacks are against a company that probably demands the least $$ per spec. of any bike company in the marketplace right now (regardless of your assurances that you might think about getting an Airborne, maybe). And yes that includes the Pathogen. If price is your gripe, there is much lower hanging fruit than Airborne. In fact you are, in essence, attacking the one company that appears to agree with you.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeinMinn View Post
    Whatever...but your redundant attacks are against a company that probably demands the least $$ per spec. of any bike company in the marketplace right now (regardless of your assurances that you might think about getting an Airborne, maybe). And yes that includes the Pathogen. If price is your gripe, there is much lower hanging fruit than Airborne. In fact you are, in essence, attacking the one company that appears to agree with you.
    Relax, he's just stating his opinion.



    The bike looks great and is spec'd and price right, but where are you allowed to ride this bike? Just bike parks at ski resorts? What is a "gravity rider"? What direction do you go when gravity pulls you? Down. Down hill? Is this not just a lower spec'd downhill bike? I think that's what musikron is getting at, and I somewhat agree. There is a fair amount of marketing lingo and attention given by bike companies to make distinctions among products to make it one seem just different enough from the other that you'll obviously need at least 4 different kinds of bikes to even go mountain biking in a variety of terrain.

    It's snowing, better buy a fat bike. Down hill sections? Can't take my XC bike in those trails. 20 ft. gaps, well you're going to need massive suspension for those puppies, at least that's what all the magazines, vids and marketing are selling us.

    The problem lies in the fact that biking in general, as fractured into extremely specific niches, and bike companies have figured out that people will spend more on a phalanx of bikes than they will on the car they use to get the to trail head.

    Personally, I think Airborne's prices are great, and so it the value you get, and it's a great alternative to the massive number of Specialized, Giant and Trek bikes that dominate nearly everything.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Westorbust View Post
    It's snowing, better buy a fat bike. Down hill sections? Can't take my XC bike in those trails. 20 ft. gaps, well you're going to need massive suspension for those puppies, at least that's what all the magazines, vids and marketing are selling us.

    The problem lies in the fact that biking in general, as fractured into extremely specific niches, and bike companies have figured out that people will spend more on a phalanx of bikes than they will on the car they use to get the to trail head.

    Personally, I think Airborne's prices are great, and so it the value you get, and it's a great alternative to the massive number of Specialized, Giant and Trek bikes that dominate nearly everything.
    It is true that you can take almost any bike into some dh sections and not die. You just take it slow. But there is a difference between a Corvette and a Honda Accord. There is likewise a difference in build between a Pathogen and a Toxin. Both can go down hill, but the Pathogen is designed for speed.

    My point being, just because I lack skill doesn't mean everyone does. For them, more aggressive (and expensive) equipment has to be built. From Airborne, it is the Pathogen; a DH bike designed for racers who use the differences to win races.

    As for this being just being his opinion. True, and he is entitled to his. But, as I said, where are the comparable dh frames that sell for less? If there aren't any, Airborne is still doing what they always have since their resurrection a few years ago....providing each of the niches with what they want for less $$.

    I agree that mtbing has become fractured. But I don't see a cure. It looks to me to be the product of success and specialization. As for me, I'll just keep riding my XC bike. I'm not a luddite about this stuff, but it serves me well where I ride. If I get into the rock gardens, I just take it slow and easy, And leave the Pathogen to Caroline B. et.al.

  20. #20
    Airborne Flight Crew
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    Quote Originally Posted by Westorbust View Post
    Relax, he's just stating his opinion.
    No, its pretty obvious he's on a tirade against the Pathogen's pricing scheme, but more to your point:

    Quote Originally Posted by Westorbust View Post
    ...but where are you allowed to ride this bike? Just bike parks at ski resorts? What is a "gravity rider"? What direction do you go when gravity pulls you? Down. Down hill? Is this not just a lower spec'd downhill bike?
    I'd be the first to agree that marketing has a handle on the industry - almost can't argue that. I can see where you are coming from. But you're not seeing or experiencing the entire picture.

    Where can you ride this bike? Are you sincerely asking?

    It's suited for any trail that is gravity assisted, that contains obstacles, jumps, steep lines... There are PLENTY of them around, they are often referred to as "shuttle trails". Bike parks are not the only place to ride downhill or freeride.

    Take California for example. Mammoth and Northstar are hours away from population centers, and it's not super convenient to drive to them every weekend. Yet the "DH" scene in CA is thriving. Trails like Telonix, Skidmarks, and (even Pacifica up near SF) are often featured in magazine ads and bike company web edits, yet there are no lifts to service these trails (however, one can take a bus to the top of the world and "shuttle" Telonix Trail that way. I think its like a $1 per trip!) You will find the similar scenarios in Colorado, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, and probably most states that have elevation/topography.

    I spent today at place in Santa Fe known as the "Trash Pit". It's a local freeride area located on a long-ish slope (not even on a mountain!). There are jumps of various sizes, several downhill lines and some huge gaps and berms. It's a great place to ride, a perfect place for bike like the Toxin. Can you ride a smaller bike there and have fun? Of course, but a longer travel bike will some of the lines a LOT more comfy, and make a couple of the lines actually possible (large jumps/drops).

    I'd LOVE to ride the Toxin at Winter Park. The trails there have some decent drops and jumps, but relatively smooth. My Taka was almost too much bike for Winter Park. Not to say it didn't work or wasn't fun - but more nimble frame with a bit less travel would have suited those trails better.

    At a park like Keystone, it's quite the opposite. Keystone is notorious for it's rough, rocky terrain. An 8 inch bike with slacker geometry is much more "fun" to ride there, as the extra travel more stable platform really handles the terrain better.

    And there's plenty of difference between the Toxin and bikes like the Pathogen. To an outsider (or one who is not really involved in Downhill/freeride) they probably just look like big bikes that people huck things with. Little details like geometry and amount of travel have a huge impact on where and how one rides these bikes.

    I won't argue that riders are being marketed to, and I'm not trying to be snarky or anything. But I don't see the Toxin as being part to this marketing thing. Its a competently spec'd bike. That it fits a particular niche should not disqualify its value.
    Airborne Flight Crew

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  21. #21
    What?
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    Very nice entry level park bike for sure. I would have hoped for some sort of compression damping on the fork though. Long travel forks need compression damping to keep from diving when properly sprung. Either way, its a great deal and for cheap the end user can add a Motion Control IS compression damper. (if you buy one, I suggest you do, its worth the money)


    As for to many sub categories of bikes, there is a big difference between a DH bike and a park pike. The biggest being the geometry. Park bikes have steeper head tube angles and shorter chain stays to make them more friendly for jumping and other bike park features. A DH bike on the other hand, will have slacker HTA and longer chainstays to make them more stable at high speeds and on steep, rocky descents. The geometry is designed to keep you lower the the ground when you jump(low is fast) There is more to it then that, but I dont feel like writing a book.

    Generally speaking, park bikes are for fun, playing around riding. DH bikes are for getting to the bottom as fast as you can. You can use use either of them at a race or bike park for fun and they will work fine, but its not what they are intended for. You can use a 6'' AM bike at a local XC race as well, just dont expect to keep up with guys on XC race bikes without working twice as hard as they are.
    Last edited by mullen119; 01-21-2014 at 11:41 AM.

  22. #22
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    Damn y'all have some think skins, quit your whining and take a midol.

  23. #23
    cbw
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    Damn now I have to wait on the unveiling of the all mountain rig and decide from there. Hurry with that one!!

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by musikron View Post
    Eh, bikes are bikes, this whole sub-division thing is getting out of hand in my opinion. Next we'll have bikes that only turn left!
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  25. #25
    Dudette
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    Any info about reach and stack and where is the SO measured from? I know a lot of people feel that standover shouldn't matter, but, from my experience and my personal preference, it does. Would love to have an affordable aggressive bike I could actually fit on properly.
    MTB4Her.com

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