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  1. #1
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    The answer you have been waiting for: Wienmann Disc Bull wheelset weight!

    A lot of people who have been interested in the Guardian seem to be asking this question, but this answer seems pretty hard to find! Since I was wondering this question myself after buying an 1850 gram wheelset to replace the stock Weinmann wheelset that comes with the Guardian, I figured I'd might as well find out the answer.

    Please note that this is only a partial answer, as I don't have a star bolt wrench readily available to remove the Tektro Auruga Comp rotors, but if someone could please chime in with the weight of that part and the bolts, we will finally have an answer to that question! I also weighed each wheel with the rubber liner and skewer ON, but I can take them off and re-weigh if needed. I did verify that skewers weighed 62 grams each.

    Ok, so the weights I came up with for wheelset with rotors, skewers, and rubber liners are:

    Front: 1412 grams (3.11 pounds)
    Rear: 1624 grams (3.58 pounds)
    Total: 3036 grams (6.69 pounds)

    The rotors weigh approximately 115g each, the liners 50g each, the bolts 14g per side, and the skewers 62g each (confirmed), which equals 241 grams per side (482 grams total). If you take away 482 grams from the total above (3036 grams), you get an approximate weight of (drumroll please):

    2554 grams per wheelset or 5.63 pounds!

    All things considered, that's not all that bad for an entry level 29er priced at $600. Biker Radar did an article about the best bikes under $1000, and these bikes (the 29ers) had wheelsets that weighed between 10.75 and 12 pounds.

    Best Mountain Bikes Under $1,000 - Updated - BikeRadar

    So I neglected to weigh the rims with the tires and tubes, but according to the thread below, and some other data I've compiled online, the total weight for the tires (355g) and tubes (172.8g) is 527.8 grams, or 1.61 pounds per side (3.22 pounds total), minus the rotors and screws (.59 pounds) for a total of 2.63 pounds.

    Airborne Goblin Component Weights

    If you add the total weight of the tires (2.63 pounds) to the approximate weight of the wheelset with all the trimmings (6.69 pounds), you get a wheelset that weighs 9.32 pounds. Not stellar by any means, but you still beat out ALL of the bikes listed in the article from Bike Radar above...even if you COUNT THE ROTORS (9.91 pounds total)...assuming my math is correct, of course!

    Anyway, I'm sure someone will find a flaw in my math, and remember, those numbers are only approximates, but it just goes to show that the Guardian is a pretty DARN GOOD value, even with a moderately heavy wheelset!
    Last edited by getagrip; 02-21-2013 at 08:45 AM.

  2. #2
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    Thank you for doing this! Nice to be able to compare wheelsets for when I upgrade.

    One question, did you include the cassette in your "total weight" measurements? The weights you posted from Bike Radar included cassettes.
    Nathan

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barheet View Post
    One question, did you include the cassette in your "total weight" measurements? The weights you posted from Bike Radar included cassettes.
    I thought about that this morning. No, I did not include the weight of the cassette, but I can weigh it later after work (a little bout 8 hours from now, SIGH). I kind of wondered if they had included that as well.

  4. #4
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    Ok, just Googled the cassette. According to JensonUSA, it weighs 382 grams or .84 pounds. Not sure if that includes the lock ring or not, but that would put the wheelset at approximately 10.75 pounds, which still beats out every bike in the Bike Radar article, minus the 26er, except it ties the the weight of the Giant Talon wheelset.

  5. #5
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    So, if you spend about $300-400 on a wheelset, you basically slash about 40% of your rotating weight. Good to know.

    That said, the stock wheels perform very well and have yet to get out of true more than a little bit for me. I just put beefier tires on my Guardian anyway. They work better in fall/winter/spring months.
    Nathan

  6. #6
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    Good to know. I was just coming online to see how that compares to the Goblin and the Goblin XO.

  7. #7
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    How about the seeker? I was torn between the two, and finally decided the seeker was more than enough bike for the light trail riding I was planning to do. Actually the guardian was my first choice but I wanted an air shock. I think the tires are the same on the seeker and goblin, but I didn't focus on The wheel set.

  8. #8
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    Yeah the Seeker and Guardian have the same wheelset. I have been looking at both very closely. I also want things like a lightweight airshock and a 1x10 drivetrain. So I am looking at both and wondering which one is better to modifiy to my needs.

  9. #9
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    The answer you have been waiting for: Wienmann Disc Bull wheelset weight!

    I kept my stock Goblin wheels for a free upgrade when I get a Seeker.

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