Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 50 of 81
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: swl7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    200

    Airborne Guardian purchase?

    Does any one know if Airborne is willing to bargain the shipping cost? I've read that they have excellent customer service as well as a possibility of cutting down costs. I don't know if I should wait on new releases to come out (if they do in the next few months) or to just purchase it since it's good for the price anyway. Any thoughts? It'd be amazing to cut down the shipping cost.

  2. #2
    AZ
    AZ is offline
    banned
    Reputation: AZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    19,205
    Quote Originally Posted by swl7 View Post
    Does any one know if Airborne is willing to bargain the shipping cost?


    Unlikely.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BigDaddyFlyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    1,831
    Kevin,

    As I told you in our private message discussion, we are unable to waive shipping.

    We are a small company that operates on a tigher format than larger companies. We make less $$$ margin per bike than the major companies and pass the savings along to you, the consumer.

    There frankly isn't enough room in the profit margin, especially on lower cost bikes like the Guardian, to waive shipping and keep our doors open in the long-run. Believe it or not most of the time it costs us more than $75 to ship a bike (since the boxes are huge) so even when you pay $75 often we are still paying $15-30 extra still to get it to your door.

    Yes, we have done a few free freight promos in the past on this model. Once was the pre-order, to help seed the market and get people on them and talking about them (think of this as poor man's marketing) and a month or two back when we did a 10-day free-freight promo on all models as a test. We quickly found out that we lost a lot of profit margin but it was a good experiment none-the-less.

    Otherwise, free freight is not the norm and we don't do bargaining or price-negotiating on bikes that are already a very good value.

    Please feel free to contact us directly with any additional questions, thanks.

    Jeremy
    Please Note: I no longer work for Airborne. If you have an Airborne question or problem please contact them directly.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: swl7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    200
    okay thanks, I won't be bothering you about this anymore. Sorry for the inconvenience for repeatedly asking.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    143
    Pay the $75 and be done with it. You will not regret it. You wont find a better bike for $675 anywhere.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: swl7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    200
    well, I'm trying to get it almost exact. It'll be more like $675 for bike + shipping, $30-$50 for pedals (since they do not ship with the bike), $?? for how much ever the LBS charges for fine tuning because although I'll be able to assemble the bike, I'm not going to trust my own engineering/handy-work on cliffs that hang over 20 feet.

    I'm looking at about $750-$800.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BigDaddyFlyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    1,831
    Quote Originally Posted by swl7 View Post
    okay thanks, I won't be bothering you about this anymore. Sorry for the inconvenience for repeatedly asking.
    No worries, it's not a bother. That's what we are here for.


    well, I'm trying to get it almost exact. It'll be more like $675 for bike + shipping, $30-$50 for pedals (since they do not ship with the bike), $?? for how much ever the LBS charges for fine tuning because although I'll be able to assemble the bike, I'm not going to trust my own engineering/handy-work on cliffs that hang over 20 feet.

    I'm looking at about $750-$800.
    The bike arrives 85% assembled, which means there isn't much to do in terms of assembly. If you aren't comfortable in doing that yourself, most shops charge about $75 - $150 for finish assembly.

    The pedals is a tough thing to compare, because like I told you in private messages, most pedals on bikes at this pricepoint are "testride pedals" meaning that they are throw-aways or good for only a few rides. Chances are for any bike you buy in this range you will want/need to buy pedals anyway.

    You also don't have tax worked into your equation. No tax from us unless you live in Ohio, Indiana, Arkansas, or California. You would have to pay tax on a bike purchased at your LBS.

    Again, I'd recommend to call us directly and talk to us if you haven't already. We'd be happy to answer any questions that you may have over the phone, and it's always good to talk to the source anyway.

    Thanks!
    Please Note: I no longer work for Airborne. If you have an Airborne question or problem please contact them directly.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: swl7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    200
    holy balls. now's about a good time to have a friend that can tune up my bike for me so I can take him/her out to dinner for the work...

    I guess I'm looking at closer to $900 for the bike. I guess I'll call Airborne sometime to see whether or not I can really afford it.

  9. #9
    AZ
    AZ is offline
    banned
    Reputation: AZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    19,205
    Quote Originally Posted by swl7 View Post
    holy balls. now's about a good time to have a friend that can tune up my bike for me so I can take him/her out to dinner for the work...

    I guess I'm looking at closer to $900 for the bike. I guess I'll call Airborne sometime to see whether or not I can really afford it.




    Unless that is dinner at Taco Bell I fail to see how you are saving anything. You really need to learn to wrench on you're own stuff, the amount of help available on youtube makes it easy. New bikes are not overly complicated to assemble if you take your time. Cut some corners, make additional purchases afterwards to spread the cost out over a period of time. Get creative, you can make this happen if it is really important to you.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: swl7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    200
    You're right. Dinner at taco bell ($5.50) vs a bike finish assembly ($100) is a big difference, but I'm not making any additional purchases. I'm just buying the bike. pedals. and shipping. There really isn't a notion of "saving" anything other than the fact that people are saying that this bike is good for its price.

  11. #11
    Mtn View, CA
    Reputation: gddyap's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    423
    I've seen a writeup on here on putting together a Goblin. Process should be identical for the Guardian. Check it out and maybe you won't feel too intimidated to try to put it together yourself. Maybe you can do a majority of the assembly and just pay the LBS to do a tuneup. That won't cost too much.
    I have come here to chew bubblegum and kick ass... and I'm all out of bubblegum.

  12. #12
    NeedGod.com
    Reputation: Barheet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    572
    I bought my Guardian knowing full well I probably wouldn't be riding it the day I got it. Why? I figured I would need some time figuring out how to assemble and tune it. It didn't really take that long, but the point is you have to be patient if you're not used to working on bikes. Take your time, watch some youtube videos and call Airborne support if needed.

    Bottom line is, now I know my bike's anatomy (and it's good to know anatomy if you're going to be riding something, eh? EH?) And if it breaks on the trail, I'll know how to fix it instead of being clueless.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    78
    Quote Originally Posted by swl7 View Post
    You're right. Dinner at taco bell ($5.50) vs a bike finish assembly ($100) is a big difference, but I'm not making any additional purchases. I'm just buying the bike. pedals. and shipping. There really isn't a notion of "saving" anything other than the fact that people are saying that this bike is good for its price.
    I guess it comes down to what you place value on and how you justify what something is worth.

    If you could find a comparable bike, with regards to geo, components etc.at an LBS and it was the same price ~$100 or so, that it would make sense to spend your money there. But you would have to compare apples to apples, which is hard to do. Because chances are the LBS bike might have one or two components that maybe a level or two below or has different features than what comes on a Airborne bike. So it might not be a direct 1 to 1 comparison.

    In my experience, the bikes that I found at the LBS in the same price range as the Airborne bikes ( pre-ordered a Goblin btw) were no where near the same quality per dollar.

    Trying to find a bike that matched the component level a the LBS raised the price significantly. The only thing that an LBS might have that would make a difference is the ability to offer no interest financing (Performance Bike for example). You are still paying more for less though. And of course service if you are not up to doing maintenance.

    In my case, putting the bike together is going to be one of the ways to get to know it better. I have built (estimate) probably close to 1000 +bikes, back when I was an assembler for a high volume LBS in the 80's. Admittedly the technology has changed so much that I will feel like a noob, no doubt.

    So you need to determine what your final cost will be to have a rider, that is acceptable for what you want. Say it is $850 total for a Guardian. Have you found a bike that matches the Guardian or comes close at an LBS?

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: zukrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    261
    swl7, where do you live? id be more than happy to help. for what its worth, mine was ridable out of the box derailleur wise. putting it together is super simple. do yourself a favor and get a 3 way allen wrench from a local shop or online dealer. its really all i used. get a 4mm, 5mm, 6mm. i bought a whole bike doctor tool kit that retails $150 for $99 at Find Bikes, Cycling Clothing, Bike Parts & Bike Shoes Or Your Local Bike Store at Performance.. however, i bought mine in store.

    regular allens work just fine, but damn if i dont love that 3 way!

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Sleevem1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    253
    Swl7
    Count yourself lucky if you only have shipping fees to worry about. I'm a Canadian who just bought the Goblin. I'm going to have to pay taxes plus duty to have it imported to Canada. I think I will still come out on top.
    PS. Bigdaddy if you read this maybe some special love for us poor saps north of the border.

  16. #16
    local bike dr.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    112
    I just assembled my Guardian yesterday evening... here are my notes describing the process:

    Assembly notes: bike pulled out of the box as one unit after removing the small box w/ front QR skewer, manual, and reflectors.
    -untied ropes binding the front tire to the bike. carefully routed the left crank arm thru the spokes as i removed and set aside the front wheel.
    -removed protective foam/cardboard pieces that wrapped and protected the frame and handlebars (were attached w/ masking tape)
    -removed protective caps from front wheel axle and installed QR skewer
    -pulled insert from front brake caliper (held pads apart during transit)
    -installed front wheel (carefully aligning rotor in between brake pads)
    -5mm hex key to loosen both bolts holding stem to steer tube, rotated stem 180°, tighten both bolts
    -5mm hex key to remove 4 bolts holding stem's handlebar cap, install handlebar, place cap on and tighten 4 bolts (tighten all 4 evenly, alternating top left, lower right, upper right, lower left, or something similar)
    -grease lightly applied to seatpost and inside frame's seat tube, loosen clamp with 5mm hex key, installed seat tube, tightened seat clamp
    -installed pedals (purchased elsewhere for $30) I tightened them with a 5/8" open end wrench, could also use a hex key if you desired
    -placed chain on front sprocket (was resting on frame)
    -removed rear wheel axle protectors
    TEST Shifting on rear derailleur before riding -
    I started with the lowest gear, by propping up the rear of the bike and pedalling with one hand while pushing the big lower lever on the right handlebar until it wouldn't change gears anymore. My chain moved past the biggest sprocket and was between the sprocket and spokes.
    That indicated the "L" screw on the rear derailleur needed tightening. After pulling the chain out of the spokes and setting it back on the sprocket, i pedalled and adjusted the lower limit screw until it was no longer jumping off the cassette.
    Next i pressed the the upper small thumb shifter while hand pedalling and changed gears until the small button no longer dropped the chain onto the next smaller sprocket. Mine had stopped but was still one sprocket away from being on the smallest one of the cassette.
    This indicated I needed to let some of the cable out, just one sprocket position's worth. I then loosened the cable clamp on the rear derailleur, pinching the cable with one hand as i loosened the 5mm allen bolt with my other hand. I allowed a very small amount of cable to move back then tightened the clamp back up and retested the shifter. I did this twice before I got it into the smallest gear on the rear cassette.

    Not too bad, in the end... 20 minutes of assembly, 10 minutes to tune the derailleur, and I was out the door. I'll fine tune the shifting some more after a week, will be about 100 miles of riding, and the cables will have all settled in. If you are having a hard time getting the shifting to work, I'd call your LBS and ask if you could sit in while the RD was tuned, setup an appointment, and learn how to do it. There's not a whole lot involved to it, after all.... upper limit screw, lower limit screw. some rear derailleurs have a tension adjustment screw. then there's the cable clamp.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    81
    Thanks G0at. My Guardian arrives on Friday.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: swl7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    200
    awesome. thanks for the replies everyone. I guess i'm having first world problems. I should really think positively... and spend some money haha.

  19. #19
    nOOb
    Reputation: jlallak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    97
    So now Airborne goes and drops the price on some of their bikes by $50.00, plus is offering free freight? IMO kind of a slap in the face. Just sayin'.
    '09 Cannondale F7
    '00 Specialized Hardrock Comp

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BigDaddyFlyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    1,831
    Not a slap in the face in the least. Those are models that are different in their profit margin structur e and will not be going forward once the remainder of stock burns thru. Unlike the Guardian.
    Please Note: I no longer work for Airborne. If you have an Airborne question or problem please contact them directly.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: swl7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    200
    halfway through the post on their website, i was extremely happy. but looking at the list for the promo; not as happy. awesome for people planning to purchase those other bikes though.

  22. #22
    nOOb
    Reputation: jlallak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    97
    Hey I think they're doing good things over there at Airborne. I hear nothing but good things, mostly. They are giving a decent product for a decent price. I will honestly have to give the new Goblin serious consideration as my next purchase. I would love to see a higher end hardtail 26er. Something with x9/x7 drivetrain, maybe Rock Shox something forks?
    '09 Cannondale F7
    '00 Specialized Hardrock Comp

  23. #23
    local bike dr.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    112
    Just wanted to point out that these are well made bikes. I'd say the frame construction and weld quality are comparable to what i saw of the Giant Talons, which I very nearly purchased one before I found out about the Guardian... Go over the 2013 Giant Talon 29er 1 and compare, similar drivetrain, fork, hydraulic brakes, frame, and yet the Airborne Guardian comes in at $675 delivered, versus the $900 Talon.... Even if you add in another $50 to get your Guardian tuned and $35 for a decent pair of pedals, you are still coming out $145 ahead. That's enough to buy a $40 Helmet, $25 multi-tool, $10 bottle cage, $12 insulated 24oz. water bottle, a nice dual action mini pump for $35, and a bike lock for $32... I kinda doubt any LBS will toss in all that as a "freebie" to sweeten the deal for ya...

  24. #24
    NeedGod.com
    Reputation: Barheet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    572
    Yeah this sale is a sweet deal. $250 shipped for a hardtail 26er with disc brakes and 21 speed? Seems like a no-brainer to me. My wife is gonna have a sweet ride.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JonathanGennick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    5,214
    Quote Originally Posted by swl7 View Post
    halfway through the post on their website, i was extremely happy. but looking at the list for the promo; not as happy. awesome for people planning to purchase those other bikes though.
    The Delta tempts me because I've been wanting something along the lines of a cross bike for mixed gravel and pavement riding. Am uncertain about sizing though, and we need a new washing-machine. So if you see me riding cross on a washing-machine, you'll understand .

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BigDaddyFlyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    1,831
    Quote Originally Posted by JonathanGennick View Post
    The Delta tempts me because I've been wanting something along the lines of a cross bike for mixed gravel and pavement riding. Am uncertain about sizing though, and we need a new washing-machine. So if you see me riding cross on a washing-machine, you'll understand .
    LOL.

    Here's a little help on the sizing. We built the Delta with traditional cyclocross geometry, meaning slightly higher BB and shorter TT, with plenty of area in the front triangle for throwing the bike up on your shoulder.

    So if you are buying it for using it as a dedicated 'cross bike, buy the size at or just below your normal road bike size. For example, I ride a 58cm road bike and my personal Delta is a 57cm. That puts the stand-over at about the same height as my normal roadbike (because of the slightly higher BB) and gives a slightly more upright position, due to the shorter TT, for riding around on bumpy grass/soil/etc.

    If you are buying it as a dedicated commuter and are looking for a longer TT, you would buy the size just over your normal road bike size, which in my case would be a 59cm. That gives you a somewhat equal TT to what you are looking for in a road bike, but beware that it will probably have a slightly higher standover height because of the higher BB.

    Hope that helps!

    Jeremy
    Please Note: I no longer work for Airborne. If you have an Airborne question or problem please contact them directly.

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation: swl7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    200
    i went ahead and got a 16" guardian. Hope I can get it before next weekend.

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BigDaddyFlyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    1,831
    Quote Originally Posted by swl7 View Post
    i went ahead and got a 16" guardian. Hope I can get it before next weekend.
    Cool, thanks! I just looked up your order. You are about a 3 day ship from the warehouse. Hopefully we can get it shipped out Monday or Tuesday for you.

    Jeremy
    Please Note: I no longer work for Airborne. If you have an Airborne question or problem please contact them directly.

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation: swl7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    200
    thanks Jeremy. I'm currently trying to find some pedals so I can hopefully get it tuned up and out on the trails by next weekend. Don't know if the wellgo mg-1's are the apple products of pedals, but are there other pedals? I was looking at the DMR v8's and people say it's pretty heavy. What factors play into this? What if the rider is extremely light?

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation: swl7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    200
    actually according to this thread: AAWYEAH.com code I went ahead and purchased wellgo mg-1's. i'm hoping that thread wasn't a collaborated effort of 5+ scammers, so I'll see if they're actually legit haha. $40 was the best I could find.

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BigDaddyFlyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    1,831
    Quote Originally Posted by swl7 View Post
    actually according to this thread: AAWYEAH.com code I went ahead and purchased wellgo mg-1's. i'm hoping that thread wasn't a collaborated effort of 5+ scammers, so I'll see if they're actually legit haha. $40 was the best I could find.
    MG-1's are light and are very smooth. I love the pair I had until one of them met a rock and practically exploded into 3 pieces. Hopefully that doesn't happen to you!
    Please Note: I no longer work for Airborne. If you have an Airborne question or problem please contact them directly.

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation: swl7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    200
    alright. just to be prepared.. I've seen the sabre assembly video on youtube by the official airborne channel. Is the assembly pretty much the same for all the bikes? (handlebar, seat post, wheels)? I'm already going to be taking the bike to a LBS or getting help from a co worker that's been working on bikes for a while.

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BigDaddyFlyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    1,831
    Quote Originally Posted by swl7 View Post
    alright. just to be prepared.. I've seen the sabre assembly video on youtube by the official airborne channel. Is the assembly pretty much the same for all the bikes? (handlebar, seat post, wheels)? I'm already going to be taking the bike to a LBS or getting help from a co worker that's been working on bikes for a while.
    The assembly for the Guardian is almost exactly the same as the Sabre. Both are hardtail XC bikes so the way that they are packed and the items that must be put on the bike are similar.

    It truthfully will take you more time to unpack the bike (remove the ties and the foam-backed paper) than it will to assemble it.

    Hope that helps!
    Please Note: I no longer work for Airborne. If you have an Airborne question or problem please contact them directly.

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rogsim's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    60
    When I got a 1st gen goblin, the assembly was as simple as can be. If you can put Ikea furniture together, you'll manage just fine.
    Last edited by rogsim; 09-07-2012 at 01:53 PM.

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    81
    My Guardian is arriving today. Juts got home from work and the UPS guy still isn't here.

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation: swl7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    200
    Quote Originally Posted by rogsim View Post
    When I got a 1st gen goblin, the assembly was as simple as can be. If you can put Ikea furniture together, you'll manage just fine.
    did you take your bike to the LBS after the initial assembly for a tune up? Did you have any issues with the ders? or are you a bike assembly pro that can do it in his/her sleep?

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    78
    Quote Originally Posted by swl7 View Post
    did you take your bike to the LBS after the initial assembly for a tune up? Did you have any issues with the ders? or are you a bike assembly pro that can do it in his/her sleep?
    Not knowing you or having any idea of your mechanical aptitude, it can be hard to judge how someone else "should" be able to put their bike together.

    Are you the type of person who can change a tire and do your own oil changes? Than chances are, this will go smoothly for you.

    If you don't know which way to turn a screw driver to tighten or loosen something up, then chances are you may "feel" overwhelmed.

    Mechanical things and how they work, how they are put together and how they come apart has always interested me. Thus I had no problems learning how to do it, and had increased confidence to start trying to fix/build something that I have never attempted before. Of course it is easy for those who have done it before, or several hundreds of time to say that anyone should be able to do it. But we are all wired differently.

    I can say that if you have basic hand tool knowledge and basic mechanical ability, That the assembly should be easy. Now if you need to adjust a dérailleur or adjust a cable, then you need to realize how the component works how each adjustment affects its function. You don't want to just blindly start turning screws for the sake of doing it.
    Also don't go "Gorilla" on tightening things up either. Easy way to spend additional money to replace a part that was formally new.
    Fortunately there is now a tool available that can teach you just about anything, They call it "The Google"

    When my Goblin arrives, I plan to slap it together ride it, get over the newness of it being my first new bike since the 80's. Then I plan to break it down to the frame. Then rebuild it the way I was taught. By making sure every bolt/cable/bearing is lubed or greased. I probably wont touch the wheels but will inspect them to make sure they are trued and check the spokes.

    To do this, I will have to invest in tools that I don't have, read: (spend money that my wife won't want me too or understand the need for) and learn something at the end of the day.
    The technology on this bike is far advance then what I was used to. I look forward to it.

    Owning a bike and riding allot, requires maintenance. Either you pay someone to do it, or you learn how to do it. (or make friends with someone who does)
    If you don't, then the bike will not last as long as it should and you will enjoy it less because of it.

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation: zukrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    261
    Comp? you in? you havent come back, so i hope your busy!

  39. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    81
    Quote Originally Posted by zukrider View Post
    Comp? you in? you havent come back, so i hope your busy!
    working on the assembly now!!

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation: zukrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    261
    very nice!

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    81
    Quote Originally Posted by G0at View Post
    I just assembled my Guardian yesterday evening... here are my notes describing the process:

    Assembly notes: bike pulled out of the box as one unit after removing the small box w/ front QR skewer, manual, and reflectors.
    -untied ropes binding the front tire to the bike. carefully routed the left crank arm thru the spokes as i removed and set aside the front wheel.
    -removed protective foam/cardboard pieces that wrapped and protected the frame and handlebars (were attached w/ masking tape)
    -removed protective caps from front wheel axle and installed QR skewer
    -pulled insert from front brake caliper (held pads apart during transit)
    -installed front wheel (carefully aligning rotor in between brake pads)
    -5mm hex key to loosen both bolts holding stem to steer tube, rotated stem 180°, tighten both bolts
    -5mm hex key to remove 4 bolts holding stem's handlebar cap, install handlebar, place cap on and tighten 4 bolts (tighten all 4 evenly, alternating top left, lower right, upper right, lower left, or something similar)
    -grease lightly applied to seatpost and inside frame's seat tube, loosen clamp with 5mm hex key, installed seat tube, tightened seat clamp
    -installed pedals (purchased elsewhere for $30) I tightened them with a 5/8" open end wrench, could also use a hex key if you desired
    -placed chain on front sprocket (was resting on frame)
    -removed rear wheel axle protectors
    TEST Shifting on rear derailleur before riding -
    I started with the lowest gear, by propping up the rear of the bike and pedalling with one hand while pushing the big lower lever on the right handlebar until it wouldn't change gears anymore. My chain moved past the biggest sprocket and was between the sprocket and spokes.
    That indicated the "L" screw on the rear derailleur needed tightening. After pulling the chain out of the spokes and setting it back on the sprocket, i pedalled and adjusted the lower limit screw until it was no longer jumping off the cassette.
    Next i pressed the the upper small thumb shifter while hand pedalling and changed gears until the small button no longer dropped the chain onto the next smaller sprocket. Mine had stopped but was still one sprocket away from being on the smallest one of the cassette.
    This indicated I needed to let some of the cable out, just one sprocket position's worth. I then loosened the cable clamp on the rear derailleur, pinching the cable with one hand as i loosened the 5mm allen bolt with my other hand. I allowed a very small amount of cable to move back then tightened the clamp back up and retested the shifter. I did this twice before I got it into the smallest gear on the rear cassette.

    Not too bad, in the end... 20 minutes of assembly, 10 minutes to tune the derailleur, and I was out the door. I'll fine tune the shifting some more after a week, will be about 100 miles of riding, and the cables will have all settled in. If you are having a hard time getting the shifting to work, I'd call your LBS and ask if you could sit in while the RD was tuned, setup an appointment, and learn how to do it. There's not a whole lot involved to it, after all.... upper limit screw, lower limit screw. some rear derailleurs have a tension adjustment screw. then there's the cable clamp.
    Thanks, G0at. Just got done with assembly and your notes were a great help.

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation: swl7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    200
    comphynum, did you also end up tuning your front der? Or are you going to be making a stop by a LBS to get that fine tuned? I think this video does a pretty good job of adjusting the der, so I thought it would be worth a try when I get my bike.

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    81
    Quote Originally Posted by swl7 View Post
    comphynum, did you also end up tuning your front der? Or are you going to be making a stop by a LBS to get that fine tuned? I think this video does a pretty good job of adjusting the der, so I thought it would be worth a try when I get my bike.
    Still have to tune. Gonna give it a go myself first. Thanks for the link.

  44. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation: zukrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    261
    swl7, i think your way to worried. adjustments are cake. just remember that a little goes a long way. where do you live, betting we could find someone near you to give a hand!

  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation: swl7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    200
    im in austin

  46. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation: swl7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    200
    oh man crazy. I guess I made my decision quick enough. Just found out that the guardian 16" is out of stock! Maybe I got the last one?

    I'm praying that it won't be the case that it was out of stock before my order

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BigDaddyFlyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    1,831
    I'm not at the office to check, but I am almost 100% certain we have plenty of 16inch Guardians. Its the 16inch green Goblin that is out of stock. I think you are OK. I'll check for certain tomorrow as I am off to a race. See ya~

    Jeremy
    Please Note: I no longer work for Airborne. If you have an Airborne question or problem please contact them directly.

  48. #48
    Cow Clicker
    Reputation: wmac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    2,031
    I'm willing to bet there are a lot of helpful people here: Forums | Austin Ridge Riders

    You could probably get some used or donated gear if you plead a good case
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation: KrazyKreitzer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    451
    I live in Ohio so I will be paying shipping and tax when I order my Goblin and the bike is still a great value.

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation: swl7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    200
    cool deal. met a worker at performance bikes that used to work at airborne. small world. i'm so excited to receive my bike!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •