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  1. #1
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    Yeti build...newbie

    Hi all. I have never built a bike before...just bought and upgraded here and there on a few pieces...I have a yeti big top frame and struggling to put together a sweet package other than just picking Shimano xt components...or maybe that is a sweet package. I used to ride alot and had a nice kona with carbon fiber wheels, Magura hydraulics, xtr derailleurs, etc. I mixed and matched. Been out of the game awhile so just looking for some input, maybe a list of your build (and if it was a yeti big top even better!). I am even stuck on sizes as I can't seem to find a list of size recommendations anywhere either. My riding is typically pretty flat with some small climbs and descents. Tight turns and just your typical pa dirt/rocky trails. Any thoughts?

  2. #2
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    Absolutely nothing wrong with using the XT group. Ive been using xt for years. For its weight vs price benefits, It's awesome for the money. Heck, even SLX is top notch right now. It's all trickle down technology anyways.

    I'm not really sure what kind of answer your looking to get since components all depend on how fat your wallet is...and what your ultimate goal is. If you don't mind spending the money to shave grams on each component...XT or XTR all day long. If you want value with the slight weight penalty, SLX is a good option. If you have a build budget...I'd personally invest a little more upfront on wheels and replace the components as they break or you see a reason to do so. At the end of the day I'd rather be out riding with lesser quality components...then staring at an unfinished build.

    What was your deciding factor to purchase that particular frame? Yeti has a great reputation but I just still consider them more of a boutique company that has to charge more for their r&d compared to some of the more mass produced frame builders. Seems like the yeti guys are very loyal no matter how the bike actually rides. With that said, if your not brand loyal and looking for top shelf quality, Niner has some smoking deals right now if that floats your boat

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pachowder View Post
    Hi all. I have never built a bike before...just bought and upgraded here and there on a few pieces...I have a yeti big top frame and struggling to put together a sweet package other than just picking Shimano xt components...or maybe that is a sweet package. I used to ride alot and had a nice kona with carbon fiber wheels, Magura hydraulics, xtr derailleurs, etc. I mixed and matched. Been out of the game awhile so just looking for some input, maybe a list of your build (and if it was a yeti big top even better!). I am even stuck on sizes as I can't seem to find a list of size recommendations anywhere either. My riding is typically pretty flat with some small climbs and descents. Tight turns and just your typical pa dirt/rocky trails. Any thoughts?
    Welcome to the tribe!! I built my Yeti Big Top and it has been one of the best bikes I have ever owned. You wont be dissapointed. I went with all Sram XO components except the crank which is X9. Thomson stem and seat post. Mavic Crossmax wheels. Ritchey carbon bars. Rock Shox Reba RLT TI fork. Here are some pics.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Yeti build...newbie-bt5.jpg  

    Yeti build...newbie-bt6.jpg  

    Yeti build...newbie-bt7.jpg  


  4. #4
    Single Speed Junkie
    Reputation: crux's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pachowder View Post
    Hi all. I have never built a bike before...just bought and upgraded here and there on a few pieces...I have a yeti big top frame and struggling to put together a sweet package other than just picking Shimano xt components...or maybe that is a sweet package. I used to ride alot and had a nice kona with carbon fiber wheels, Magura hydraulics, xtr derailleurs, etc. I mixed and matched. Been out of the game awhile so just looking for some input, maybe a list of your build (and if it was a yeti big top even better!). I am even stuck on sizes as I can't seem to find a list of size recommendations anywhere either. My riding is typically pretty flat with some small climbs and descents. Tight turns and just your typical pa dirt/rocky trails. Any thoughts?
    Todays XT group was yesterdays XTR package. The technology all trickles down. In my cycling career I've used quite a bit of different brands and levels of gear. XT is what I consider as high performance without the premium price. I'm building up a Yeti as well currently and looking at the XT group as the component level for the bike. Only change from OEM I'm thinking of is the wheels and that is only because I have a pair of hoops on the wall waiting for a build.

  5. #5
    crash test dummy
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    I ride a medium big top. I love it. It is very purpose-built for the rocky, technical trails with short, steep hills we have in New England. I went 1x10 with a sram X.9 rear derailleur and an e-thirteen LG1+ chain guide and taco bash guard. Makes the drivetrain dead silent, super reliable, and very smooth shifting. Only issue I have had is that the bottom pulley on the guide tends to rub my rear tire during cornering when the tire deforms, because 29ers have such a large diameter. I'll have to fiddle with it.

    I use Stans Arch EX rims laced to Hope Pro Evo hubs. I will never, ever go back to tubes. Easily the biggest difference in bike handling, traction, and reliability possible.

    The only other part worth mention is the Shimano SLX brakes and Ice Tech rotors. This is, in my opinion, the biggest no brainer equipment decision in mtn biking right now. Shimano just nailed it with this brake design - they are super positive and modulate beautifully in all conditions. I saw no reason at all to go with XT. The $100 saved is definitely better spent on crank or fork if you're on a budget.

  6. #6
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    Pachowder - Welcome to the tribe ! check the Yeti tab in the bike mfg forums if you haven't been there yet - lots of good info on those that have the Big Tops !

    Yeti_NH - sweet BT, love the color scheme with the black rear triangle ! Are your Ritchey carbon bars the 685 mm flat bar ?
    my yeti is smarter than your honor student !

  7. #7
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    Except for shifters SLX is very close or the same as XT but for a few grams. You can save a little more with the same performance.

  8. #8
    Trail Ninja
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    An XTR part will have more of its individual pieces being worked on in the machines for a longer period of time, and they will heat treat it to realign the grain structure and increase its strength, put a nicer hard anodized coating on it to provide longer wear, etc. The further down the totem pole you go, the fewer finishing touches are done (lack of polishing, etc.), cheaper finishes (nickel plating), less machining (heavier, maybe not as tight tolerances)... basically less steps that would've made it lighter, more precise, and longer wearing. Sometimes better materials too, like ti cassette cogs. Higher end Shimano chainrings are particularly amazing. This year's XT is def not last year's XTR. It's just this years XT with some features that might have been exclusive to XTR before, done in a fashion more suitable for larger scale mass production.

    Even if they could dedicate all the machines in a factory to building components of 1 group at a time, I imagine that the factory would be able to churn out far fewer XTR components in a day than they would XT. If they demanded an impossible quota of the factory, to get more XTR parts out, the quality would probably suffer and # of defects may increase.

    That said, there's probably not enough notable difference between XTR and XT that you can feel when on the bike, to justify the cost difference. It sure looks pretty though and you can't really judge durability/longevity that reliably, unless you put years of crazy miles on both and record it.

    IMO, if you're buying fresh and new, check out SRAM's XX1. Everyone's raving about it. It's hard to find it in stock though and I would be surprised if SRAM's December shipment is spoken for already.
    Last edited by Varaxis; 12-23-2012 at 01:37 PM.

  9. #9
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    I will never, ever go back to tubes. Easily the biggest difference in bike handling, traction, and reliability possible.

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