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  1. #1
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    XX1 gearing: Handy chart to see what front chain ring to buy based on XX gear ratios

    I did a bunch of searching around to compare the gearing for my existing XX 2x10 with 24/38 in front and 11/36 in the rear in order to decide what would be the best gearing for the very steep bay area mountains for my XX upgrade. I was annoyed by the simple rounding that everyone was doing just to one decimal place which did not give an accurate comparison and a good sense for the gear spacing that is inherent to XX and XX1.

    As you can see in this chart the granny gear on my XX is equivalent to a .667 gear ratio so if I go with a 28 front chainring with XX1 I will get the exact same ratio for the lowest gear and be effectively at the same ratio as having my front chain ring at 38 and rear in the second gear which is roughly 13.78 ratio. So I only lose two very top end gears. You can play around with the assumptions to fit your style and specific geography.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails XX1 gearing:  Handy chart to see what front chain ring to buy based on XX gear ratios-sram_gearing_xx_xx1.png  

    Last edited by drolling; 05-20-2013 at 10:36 AM.

  2. #2
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    I think I understand. If I wanted to go XX1 without loosing too many of my climbing gears and I currently run 39/26 up front and 11-36 rear I would have the same range minus 1 small cog by going with the 36t up front?
    The unexamined life is not worth living - Socrates
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  3. #3
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    Yes, that is basically the conclusion I came to. You either lose one at the top end or one at the bottom end of the range. For the big hills we have in SF I am mostly coasting on the way down for the technical trails so don't need the high speed gear and would rather have a lower gear.

  4. #4
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    If you go with 36 up front with XX1 you would actually lose your two bottom low gears

    Here is a picture of your setup now and what it would look like. If you go with 36 up front with XX1 you would actually lose your two bottom low gears. 34 would be a little worse losing 1 and change of your climbing gears. A 32 would be a touch lower than your second lowest gear and 30 would be also a touch lower than your lowest gear. The chart that is attached should help you out.


    XX1 gearing:  Handy chart to see what front chain ring to buy based on XX gear ratios-xx_26.39-11.36.png


    Quote Originally Posted by J3SSEB View Post
    I think I understand. If I wanted to go XX1 without loosing too many of my climbing gears and I currently run 39/26 up front and 11-36 rear I would have the same range minus 1 small cog by going with the 36t up front?
    Last edited by drolling; 05-21-2013 at 07:11 AM.

  5. #5
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    The nice thing is you can swap out the front chain ring quite easily. I have a 32 up front and for So Cal conditions it works well.

  6. #6
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    Chain ring length switching front cogs on xx1

    DeeZee: any idea if you have to adjust the chain lengths if you switch between cogs? Does that mean you have to buy a couple of chains for the different size front chains?

    Quote Originally Posted by DeeZee View Post
    The nice thing is you can swap out the front chain ring quite easily. I have a 32 up front and for So Cal conditions it works well.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by drolling View Post
    Here is a picture of your setup now and what it would look like. If you go with 36 up front with XX1 you would actually lose your two bottom low gears. 34 would be a little worse losing 1 and change of your climbing gears. A 32 would be a touch lower than your second lowest gear and 30 would be also a touch lower than your lowest gear. The chart that is attached should help you out.


    Attachment 799327
    Cool. Thanks for doing this. I think I can manage loosing some small gears and tall ones. 34t up front sounds good. I may do that.
    The unexamined life is not worth living - Socrates
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  8. #8
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    I have 2 chainrings and 2 chains. 32T for at home (Netherlands) and a 28T for in the Alps. In this way i have big gears for flat grounds and climbing gears in the Alps. Regarding the 28T i'm losing some big gears but that is no problem. When going downhill...just use the flow and stop pedaling.

    As far as i understand from SRAM you can go 1 size chainring bigger or smaller without changing the chain. Which should mean i could run 28T and 32T when i shorten my chain on a 30T. Nevertheless i have chosen to run 2 chains. Keeps the wear down also.

  9. #9
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    You can also play with gear ratios here...Sheldon Brown's Bicycle Gear Calculator

    SPP
    Rigid.

  10. #10
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    I'm a fan of this gear calculator. It allows you to compare to set ups at once and has lots of pre-made cassettes and chainring combos in it, including XX1.

    http://www.gear-calculator.com/#

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by drolling View Post
    DeeZee: any idea if you have to adjust the chain lengths if you switch between cogs? Does that mean you have to buy a couple of chains for the different size front chains?
    The rule of thumb is up or down one size you are ok. Two sizes and you need two chains. I don't know this for sure because the 32 seems to work fine for me and haven't had the need to change.

  12. #12
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    XX1 gearing: Handy chart to see what front chain ring to buy based on XX gea...

    DRolling, would love to see the ratios for the brand new Shimano xtr 11-40 cassette...can't find a calculator as clear and simple as yours...possible to do? Cog is 11-13-15-17-19-21-24-27-31-35-40. Curious to see various chain rings 28, 30, 32, 34. Thanks so much in advance if you can do it...not looking to create work for you!

    Edit: figured it out! Easy math.
    Last edited by MattMay; 04-14-2014 at 06:53 AM.

  13. #13
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    Shimano 1x11 comparison chart

    Here you go! Enjoy.

    XX1 gearing:  Handy chart to see what front chain ring to buy based on XX gear ratios-shimano_1x11_comparison.jpgXX1 gearing:  Handy chart to see what front chain ring to buy based on XX gear ratios-xx1-1x11-gearing-comparison.jpg
    Last edited by drolling; 04-14-2014 at 03:22 PM.

  14. #14
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    XX1 gearing: Handy chart to see what front chain ring to buy based on XX gear ratios

    Thank you!! Figured it out but yours is prettier!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  15. #15
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    Sorry Matt was in Vegas this weekend and didn't have access to a computer to get this done sooner for you.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by ALS650L View Post
    I'm a fan of this gear calculator. It allows you to compare to set ups at once and has lots of pre-made cassettes and chainring combos in it, including XX1.

    http://www.gear-calculator.com/#
    Thanks for the link. That is the best gear calculator I've seen and I've tried a few. It provides a graphic/visual comparison of two gear ranges as well as providing ratios and gear inches.
    The trouble with having an open mind is that people will insist on trying to put things in it.

  17. #17
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    Ronnie,

    The problem with this and every other gear calculator is that you have to drag and drop a bunch of different gears and it does not allow you to quickly and easily compare what you have now and what you want to achieve. If you have a current set up most riders already know what gear they have to be along different segments of your favorite ride. So for me in my old 2x10 set up I knew that I needed at least the second lowest gear to climb any hill in the bay area and that an extra granny gear was also nice when I got tired. I also knew that I seldom ever used the very tallest gears so was willing to sacrifice 2-3 mph of top speed in exchange for better climbing gears. Everyone has a different preference and since I already did the work all you have to do is spot check your current set up and match it with what you want.

    No normal human being understands how many gear inches they are pulling nor is that a particularly relevant data set. What is relevant is what gear am I in now to keep up my cadence and if I switch gearing what will I need to meet 90% of my goals.

    I think all 1x11 set ups are significantly better. What you lose out in range you can easily make up for in losing half a pound of weight and the inherent maintenance and complexity associated with a front derailleur.

  18. #18
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    With all due respect, I have to disagree with you. That gear calculator, unlike most others, displays up to two totally separate drive trains. They are displayed one above the other in a linear fashion for direct comparison. You can also shift the chain rings to immediately see how it changes. Therefore it very much allows me to directly compare what I currently have with any possible drive train, lined up one against the other.

    Not only is gear inches important, it is perhaps the most important value. It is not very difficult to understand. Simply put it is the number of inches the wheel rotates with one revolution of the cranks. It is influenced by the wheel size and even tire size. In other words wheel diameter. If for example I was building a new 29" bike and my old bike was a 26", I can directly find out how the gearing compares by considering gear inches. Gear ratio doesn't tell me what the final drive would be like. The gear calculator inputs wheel size and tire size.

    By the way, I'm also in the Bay Area so I know some of the climbs around here can be brutal. I've considered an XX1 drive train but it just doesn't work for me. I've currently got a 29" bike with a nine speed 22/34T granny gear which is lower than the 28/42T on XX1. with a 32T ring I have better range than XX1, both top and bottom. I really don't care about a few ounces and will stick with a two ring crankset.
    The trouble with having an open mind is that people will insist on trying to put things in it.

  19. #19
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    Wondering if anyone on this thread could explain why my brand new XX1 cassette won't fit onto the following freebody that converted onto my DT swiss hub perfectly:

    Full Warranty DT Swiss XD 11 Speed 142x12mm thru Axle Freehub Body for XX1 | eBay

    The free body has one special male slot that is unlike the surrounding slots while the cassette has the same size female slots throughout. I guess I was duped somehow?

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stumpjumper61 View Post
    Wondering if anyone on this thread could explain why my brand new XX1 cassette won't fit onto the following freebody that converted onto my DT swiss hub perfectly:

    Full Warranty DT Swiss XD 11 Speed 142x12mm thru Axle Freehub Body for XX1 | eBay

    The free body has one special male slot that is unlike the surrounding slots while the cassette has the same size female slots throughout. I guess I was duped somehow?
    I figured it out. This is why I should not wrench on bikes late at night. For those of you new to XX1/X01 you need to know something. When installing the cassette there is no separate nut that you screw on to hold the cassette on to the freehub. Normally you slide on the cassette and it seats all the way onto the free hub and THEN you install your nut and torque it down. Well, not anymore!! With the XX1/X01 you slide on the cassette but it does not seat all the way on the freehub, rather it stops flush with the keys approx 3/16 from all the way on.

    You then take your park cassette tightening tool and screw the cassette on, the nut is not a separate item but basically built in to the cassette to form a one piece system. When you tighten the cassette then seats all the way to the rear of the freehub.

    Hope this helps some newbees out there who won't be scratching their head like I did.

  21. #21
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    XX1 gearing: Handy chart to see what front chain ring to buy based on XX gea...

    Quote Originally Posted by drolling View Post
    Sorry Matt was in Vegas this weekend and didn't have access to a computer to get this done sooner for you.
    You were more than helpful. I found your chart most useful...three decimals vs one, and because most of us --who know how our gears feel, the cadence we like, which ones we use in which trails--really just need reference points. For me, ctual/absolute numbers aren't meaningful, just ability to know chain X cog=what I use on this/that trail, climb, etc). Big help, so thanks again!

    I built out a chart that's not designed as well as yours, but was able to decide that waiting for the new 11/40 Shimano and a 32 chain would be my sweet spot for so Cal when I convert from 2x10 to 1x11.

    You ride out Vegas way? Spent Thanksgiving there last year...some good trails.

    XX1 gearing:  Handy chart to see what front chain ring to buy based on XX gear ratios-imageuploadedbytapatalk1397530568.196304.jpg

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    Matt,

    You are hitting the nail on the head here and this is exactly why I built the chart. People are adding in all kinds of crazy variables like switching out to custom cranks and rings and different size wheels. 90% of all people know what rough gear they use on what trails and sections. What people really need with a 1x11 setup is to find the lowest gear possible that will enable them to still comfortably climb the steepest hill. With a 1x11 setup the trade off is less range between gears and you are going to lose maybe 1 to 1.5 of your highest and/or lowest gears depending on what you are going after. Most people can live with that trade off given you lose half a pound and most importantly when taking a bike off road you are reducing a very large failure point which is the front derailleur. My bike with xx1 is now basically zero maintenance versus before when cables stretched, dirt got into the mechanics or if you crashed it was a delicate thing that was easily damaged. I also don't think SRAM is particularly good at making a front derailleur in either road or mtb formats. I know because I have had them all. I also love the simplicity of my cockpit with XX1.

    If you are firing an artillery weapon and want to know where the bullet should be aimed so it will land in the place you want it to there are two different methodologies.
    1) you spend a lot of time calculating variances in wind speed, weight of the shell, force of the propellant, heat of the shell at velocity, air temperature and density, wind resistance, and the list goes on and on.

    2) Another more intelligent and successful strategy is you just point the weapon and fire it and see where the shell lands. You then just adjust where you are pointing until it goes where you want it to. That term is called bore sighting and this is exactly what I was trying to do with this chart.

    The people who keep on posting their silly gear calculators are getting caught up in the minutia and not realizing what a simple chart can do for you which is to get you riding the right gear ratios with the best tradeoffs.

  23. #23
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    Stumpjumper61

    I love working on my bike as well and have learned the same thing about working too late on bikes can cause a lack of sleep at best or frustration at worst.

    Glad you were able to figure it out. On XX1 the freehub body just pops off with hand pressure and you put it on with your hands and then wrench on the cassette. By the way if you have not tried Pedro's cassette tool designed by Lennard Zinn you are in for a real treat. It made playing around with my cassettes with my constant tinkering much less painful on my knuckles and hands from removing them with a traditional chain whip.

    Quote Originally Posted by Stumpjumper61 View Post
    I figured it out. This is why I should not wrench on bikes late at night. For those of you new to XX1/X01 you need to know something. When installing the cassette there is no separate nut that you screw on to hold the cassette on to the freehub. Normally you slide on the cassette and it seats all the way onto the free hub and THEN you install your nut and torque it down. Well, not anymore!! With the XX1/X01 you slide on the cassette but it does not seat all the way on the freehub, rather it stops flush with the keys approx 3/16 from all the way on.

    You then take your park cassette tightening tool and screw the cassette on, the nut is not a separate item but basically built in to the cassette to form a one piece system. When you tighten the cassette then seats all the way to the rear of the freehub.

    Hope this helps some newbees out there who won't be scratching their head like I did.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by drolling View Post
    The people who keep on posting their silly gear calculators are getting caught up in the minutia and not realizing what a simple chart can do for you which is to get you riding the right gear ratios with the best tradeoffs.

    I guess everyone operates differently because honestly I can't make heads or tails of your chart. The gear calculator that ALS650L posted looks interesting but also seems a little time consuming. For me nothing is simpler than this one- BikeCalc.com - Bicycle Gear Inches Chart

    Super easy and quick to change ratios around and if I want to compare one setup to another I just open another window and place them side by side. What is your problem with gear inches? For me one reference # is as good as another.

  25. #25
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    JB Weld:

    My chart is super simple to read. All you do is look on the left side and find your existing XX or XTR 2x10 lowest gear ratio that you can comfortably climb your steepest hill on whatever ride you like. Then you look on the right side for the XX1 or XTR 1x11 different front chain rings and match that number to roughly the same number you already picked on the left hand side of the chart.

    Easy peazey lemon squeezy as my daughter likes to say.


    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    I guess everyone operates differently because honestly I can't make heads or tails of your chart. The gear calculator that ALS650L posted looks interesting but also seems a little time consuming. For me nothing is simpler than this one- BikeCalc.com - Bicycle Gear Inches Chart

    Super easy and quick to change ratios around and if I want to compare one setup to another I just open another window and place them side by side. What is your problem with gear inches? For me one reference # is as good as another.

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