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  1. #1
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    Trek Wahoo...what to upgrade first?

    I realize this is a descent entry level hardtail bike (that's why I bought it)...but was wondering if anyone has any experience with this bike and what they changed on it first. Or perhaps anyone who bought a similar entry level bike...what was your first upgrade to the bike that made a big difference? Love the bike so far...but I know there is always ways to improve.

  2. #2
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    Pedals

  3. #3
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    LX 175MM crank, nine speed XT shifters casette/, Wheels , tires and fork is next.

  4. #4
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    Replace as parts wear/break, and save money until then for trips to awesome places to ride.

    If you have more money then time, replace parts as they break/wear, and get proper clothing+shoes+pedals, and then fork, then wheels, and then drivetrain.

    Remember, adventure can happen on any bike, go find it. Explore.
    Disclaimer:I work in a Bike Shop.http://www.northcentralcyclery.com/

  5. #5
    ballbuster
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cruiznblue View Post
    I realize this is a descent entry level hardtail bike (that's why I bought it)...but was wondering if anyone has any experience with this bike and what they changed on it first. Or perhaps anyone who bought a similar entry level bike...what was your first upgrade to the bike that made a big difference? Love the bike so far...but I know there is always ways to improve.
    Tires and light tubes are an easy, cheap (relatively) upgrade that can easily drop 2 pounds of rotating weight off the bike for under a hundred bucks easy... maybe even half that if you find good deals. Best bang for the buck right there. Panaracer has a new tire called the Soar, which is crazy light, folks say it has great grip, and Amazon sells them for like $23 each.

    A good air fork will drop some more weight, (like a pound to pound and a half) but more importantly make it feel way better. Find yourself a deal on a Rockshox Reba, good used or new.

    Pedals, saddle and grips for comfort items.

    The rest is not going to drop tons of weight, but worth upgrading as you wear stuff out, or as you find deals. I find loads of great deals at swap meets and craigslist.

  6. #6
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    Depending on where you ride, if you want to ride difficult trails with rocks and roots and technical sections---the fork will make the most difference followed by tires and at least the front wheel. Light high volume tires like RaRa Performance at 25psi or so on light 1800g wheels. A Manitou Tower Pro or Reba dual air fork is a prime choice. Start looking for deals.

  7. #7
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    Thanks for the input everyone! I will definitely take a look at all those suggestions..
    Trek Wahoo Gary Fisher Edition 29er (2012)

  8. #8
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    I have the same bike, which I bought for the same reason - decent entry level and relatively inexpensive.

    I feel like there is always a push to upgrade, upgrade, better components, lighter components...

    What I am doing, and my suggestion to you, is to just ride your Wahoo for awhile so you get a feel for the way it rides, and then determine what you like and don't like about it specifically. Other folks aren't having the same experience as you on your bike where you ride.

    Do you notice you hate the saddle? Upgrade that first. Do you notice your foot slipping off the pedals? Upgrade those first. Do you notice the shifting isn't a smooth as you'd like, maybe upgrade the whole bike to one with a better component set (since you didn't mention a budget). Wanna be able to say you have or enjoy the latest/greatest/lightest/whatever-est cool thing on your bike? Upgrade to that component (or a new bike). Not enough water when you ride? Upgrade your water bottle to a hydration pack or a larger water reservoir. Is your helmet squeezing your head? Get a new helmet.

    All of these possible first upgrades would make a big difference, but whatever your upgrade is (whether it be your first or your last), it should ultimately enhance your biking experience.

    As for my Wahoo, so far I have upgraded the pedals and the saddle, as well as the mount for my Garmin, because those are things I touch while riding and my comfort on the bike is my first priority. Some of my upgrades aren't working, though - I hate my saddle "upgrade," and am not sure about my pedals yet. So despite spending a few $$, I am still working on my first upgrades.

    My next upgrade will be the grips because I touch those, too, and then the tires because they touch the ground. After that, I plan on just enjoying the bike as much as possible and on as many different trails as possible, making note of things that I think will improve my experience. Then I think I will be able to decide if I want to upgrade components on the bike or the bike altogether.

  9. #9
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    The only thing you should be upgrading right away on a new bike is to pedals you like, a saddle your arse likes if the stock one doesn't work, grips maybe and tyres if the stock ones don't work on your trails. Other than those things, if you want better components you should have bought a better bike straight up.

    No sense buying a $600 bike and then throwing $$ at it past necessary upgrades for fit or tyres that work for your area, much better off just riding the crap out of it, learn what type of riding you like to do and what you like or dislike about the bike and it's parts and save for a new complete bike.
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  10. #10
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    ^^^
    Mostly agree. I'd just add that sometimes a different stem size to land the grips in the right place makes a really big difference.

    If you think about the cost (retail or wholesale) on bigger-ticket items like the fork and the wheels, and you think about the cost of getting a bike that already has what you want on it, it usually doesn't make a ton of sense to replace big-ticket stuff on a new bike. If it's old enough for things to legitimately wear out, it may be another story.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  11. #11
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    My goal is not to make an elite bike out of an entry level bike...but just to enhance the riding experience a bit as I go. With that said, I have been pricing pedals, shoes, gear, tires lately as those seem to be the biggest recommendations so far...and I've definitely lost my footing on the pedals a few times wearing my normal running shoes with the stock pedals. :/

    I still havent decided if the seat is the problem for my arse hurting or if it is just getting used to sitting on a bike. I'll have to wait on that for now.

    I want to eventually get a nice FS bike down the road (would have bought one intially but didn't know if I would love riding or not)...but would like to also have a decent HT too that I will still want to ride years from now. Also the idea of swapping parts out and custom upgrading a bike seems more enjoyable then just buying something and not having to do anything to it.
    Trek Wahoo Gary Fisher Edition 29er (2012)

  12. #12
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Hey, we all had to buy our first bikes at some point. I'm tired of replacing crap on my MTB. I'm promising myself that the next one will ship race-ready, so all I have to do is make it fit. Which could involve all the stuff in post #9 and also a stem. But if researching and messing around with the stuff on the bike holds value for you, it's a little bit of a different story from bang-for-the-buck with an eye to ride quality and cost only. In which case, fork, brakes, front derailleur, maybe shifters. Probably wheels by this time next year. You've already seen the arguments against, so I won't bother to restate them.

    Are your stock pedals the black plastic monstrosities? If so, start there. Non-sucky pedals make a huge difference in how much fun it is to ride off-road. I'm a clipless pedals guy and prefer Time ATAC Aliums. However, I don't care to make a pronouncement about clipless being "better" or something. Better flat pedals work really well too. Their fans suggest getting appropriate shoes. 5.10s are a popular recommendation but with how much I ride flats, I just wear running shoes myself.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  13. #13
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    I have a Trek Mamba, which is the same exact frame as yours with different fork, derailleurs, brakes etc. Aside from that stuff which you may upgrade as they wear/break, I changed the following:

    RaceFace 70mm stem- on steep drops I felt like I was WAY too far forward and couldn't get my weight behind the saddle with my arms stretched to the max.

    RaceFace 710mm bars, 1.5" rise/Sette Lock-on palmswell grips- similar to above reason, the 20mm wider bars helped keep any twitch/instability I got by shortening the stem to a minimal. These two changed the characteristics of the bike greatly and improved my confidence on the DH stuff we sometimes tackle.

    Serfas Dual Density seat/cut seatpost- stock seat hurt too much. Had this seat on my previous bike so I swapped it over. Stock 400mm seatpost in the bike was ridiculous overkill for me, I felt like I was riding a horse. Cut about 2.5" off and I feel much more stable on slow/technical stuff and allows me to get my weight transferred rearward going DH.

    VP Components Vice pedals and Teva Pinner shoes- my feet kept flying off the pedals in tight technical stuff, needed something to keep me planted and I don't consider myself to be at the level where clipless is a good idea. Haven't had much time to test the setup, but with the little bit I did do I am happy and should be well served by the shoe/pedal combo.

    Next on my list is tires and either the X-firm spring or Solo Air kit for my fork so it can handle my weight.

    ETA: Like others have said my goal wasn't to cut weight to a minimum or have the most bada$$ new stuff out there. My goal was, and still is, to make it fit right and thus make my riding experience more enjoyable. If you don't have a good LBS you wish to patron, you can look for leftover parts deals online (some of my parts were 2011 leftovers @ 40%+ off).
    Last edited by mamba1220; 10-23-2012 at 07:42 PM.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by mamba1220 View Post
    I changed the following:

    RaceFace 70mm stem- on steep drops I felt like I was WAY too far forward and couldn't get my weight behind the saddle with my arms stretched to the max.

    RaceFace 710mm bars, 1.5" rise/Sette Lock-on palmswell grips- similar to above reason, the 20mm wider bars helped keep any twitch/instability I got by shortening the stem to a minimal. These two changed the characteristics of the bike greatly and improved my confidence on the DH stuff we sometimes tackle.

    Serfas Dual Density seat/cut seatpost- stock seat hurt too much. Had this seat on my previous bike so I swapped it over. Stock 400mm seatpost in the bike was ridiculous overkill for me, I felt like I was riding a horse. Cut about 2.5" off and I feel much more stable on slow/technical stuff and allows me to get my weight transferred rearward going DH.
    If those cheanges were required to make the bike "fit" I suspect you're on the worng size frame.

    Either that or your "preferred fit" is far from what most riders prefer.

    Or you got the wrong type of bike altogether.
    Mike
    Toronto, Canada
    2014 Giant TCX SLR2
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swerny View Post
    If those cheanges were required to make the bike "fit" I suspect you're on the worng size frame.

    Either that or your "preferred fit" is far from what most riders prefer.

    Or you got the wrong type of bike altogether.
    Turns out I've been doing a lot more Mountain and DH than I originally thought, hence some of the changes.

    Having the right frame size doesn't always mean the bars land in the exact right spot for you. Stems/bars/posts etc. are available in many variations for that reason.

  16. #16
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    Ive been riding the same bike for over a year now. I found that the absolute first thing to upgrade was the saddle of course. Next I put on some ergon sp-1 grips, much better on the hands! This past month or so I recently dug into my pockets and sprung for a Reba RL, some avid bb-7's, and clipless pedals. It makes the ride so much more enjoyable! Still wanting to upgrade the stem, handlebar and seatpost... Basically everything but the frame!

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by pkeit32 View Post
    Ive been riding the same bike for over a year now. I found that the absolute first thing to upgrade was the saddle of course. Next I put on some ergon sp-1 grips, much better on the hands! This past month or so I recently dug into my pockets and sprung for a Reba RL, some avid bb-7's, and clipless pedals. It makes the ride so much more enjoyable! Still wanting to upgrade the stem, handlebar and seatpost... Basically everything but the frame!
    Nice...what seat did you get?
    Trek Wahoo Gary Fisher Edition 29er (2012)

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