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  1. #1
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    stem rise vs. handlebar rise?

    I bought a used rigid fork and the steer tube was cut a little too short for my liking, so I had to remove spacers for everything to fit back together once I replaced the stock fork.

    Now I feel a little stretched out/reaching.

    My question is what's the diff between using a stem w/ more rise vs. a riser bar? don't these accomplish the same thing?

    Or am i completely wrong and it's a stem LENGTH issue? lol

  2. #2
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    there are multiple ways to skin a cat =]

    if you get the grips in the exact same spot with shorter stem vs. higher rise, there will be a slight difference in how the bike steers but probably very minor compared to the comfort of your back, elbows, wrists, and the added efficiency of a well fit bike.

    best advice I can give you is to go get fit by a pro. Who knows, maybe your saddle position can be adjusted to alleviate all the previously mentioned problems?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by allrachet View Post
    I bought a used rigid fork and the steer tube was cut a little too short for my liking, so I had to remove spacers for everything to fit back together once I replaced the stock fork.

    Now I feel a little stretched out/reaching.

    My question is what's the diff between using a stem w/ more rise vs. a riser bar? don't these accomplish the same thing?

    Or am i completely wrong and it's a stem LENGTH issue? lol
    How many spacers did you have to remove?

    You can play with the online stem chart to plug in what you had (amount of spacers and exact stem you had) and see what it would take in stem rise and length to replicate with the new fork what you had with the old fork here.

  4. #4
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    Is the axle to crown distance on the new fork the same as the old? That may have a large impact on bike handling and ergonomics.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by allrachet View Post
    I bought a used rigid fork and the steer tube was cut a little too short for my liking, so I had to remove spacers for everything to fit back together once I replaced the stock fork.

    Now I feel a little stretched out/reaching.

    My question is what's the diff between using a stem w/ more rise vs. a riser bar? don't these accomplish the same thing?

    Or am i completely wrong and it's a stem LENGTH issue? lol
    Like the others have said, it does not matter how you get your grips to a given position. (higher stem vs high rise bar).

    I would use one of those stem calculators like was linked to above, because as you increase the rise angle, you essentially shorten the horizontal reach.

    If your fork length (axle to crown length) has changed much, then you may need to do some tweaking beyond simply re-creating your old grip position.

    So to answer your last question, if your fork length has changed much, then it COULD be a stem length (reach) issue as well.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  6. #6
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    I went from a kona p2 to a pace carbon...i'll look into further.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by allrachet View Post
    I went from a kona p2 to a pace carbon...i'll look into further.
    It should be easy enough to measure, and since they are both rigid, you will truly be comparing apples to apples.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  8. #8
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    I prefer a rise in the stem compared to rise bars or spacers under the stem. It will be lighter and stiffer if you use comparable parts.

  9. #9
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    If the handlebars are at the same spot, it doesn't matter handling-wise how they got there. Spacers, rise in the stem or riser bars - doesn't make a difference.

    Stiffness and weight might vary between these choices. Short steerer, rise in the stem and flat bars should be the lightest and stiffest option by default, but it depends on the steerer, stem and handlebar design and materials.

  10. #10
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    I hear ya but cant help but feel a difference in leverage/feel with rise/norise/- rise etc - regardless on grips to saddle height

    i.e - run a straight stem with riser bar or riser stem with flat bar (stem and bar the same size) - it feels different to me. Call me stupid

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnd663 View Post
    I hear ya but cant help but feel a difference in leverage/feel with rise/norise/- rise etc - regardless on grips to saddle height

    i.e - run a straight stem with riser bar or riser stem with flat bar (stem and bar the same size) - it feels different to me. Call me stupid
    Part of that may be that so many rise bars have more sweep to them than most flats. I think that if the grips are in the exact same place you wouldn't be able to tell if you didn't know.

  12. #12
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    Question for all you people who paid attention in science/math classes -

    Would a negative rise stem that gets your bars to the same place, but does so with the stem clamped higher on the steerer tube (relative to a positive rise stem) provide more leverage?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by antonio View Post
    Question for all you people who paid attention in science/math classes -

    Would a negative rise stem that gets your bars to the same place, but does so with the stem clamped higher on the steerer tube (relative to a positive rise stem) provide more leverage?
    More leverage measured where?

    On the head tube (and therefore on the bike as a whole)? No difference.

    This has been hashed out many times in other threads.
    Last edited by kapusta; 01-11-2013 at 05:57 AM.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnd663 View Post
    I hear ya but cant help but feel a difference in leverage/feel with rise/norise/- rise etc - regardless on grips to saddle height

    i.e - run a straight stem with riser bar or riser stem with flat bar (stem and bar the same size) - it feels different to me. Call me stupid
    I believe you may have felt a difference in stiffness, but I would put my money on that being due to differences in the stem and bar. In addition to some bar/stems simply being stiffer to others, differences in width and sweep make a big difference in feel.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  15. #15
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    It would provide more stress on the steerer so yes it would. You could have a giant circle stem on the front with a circumference of 4 feet but have the grips in the same place, do you think that would give you any advantage? I think all it would give you is a hell of a lot of flex. You would also have an heck of a lot of leverage on the top of the steerer. No useful leverage like people get by going to wider bars but leverage trying to sheer the top of the steerer off.

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