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Thread: SRAM vs Shimano

  1. #1
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    SRAM vs Shimano

    I'm looking at the differences between the Trek Rumblefish Elite vs the basic Rumblefish(drivetrain).

    Elite comes with Shimanos SLX and I'll have the SRAM x7.

    Anyone know differences performance wise? I'm not familiar with SRAM at all and would rather sell the SRAM set for Shimano anyday, not to mention I have the XT clipless and M162 shoes. Its going to be a brand new system so I know it'll be nice but I'm familiar with Shimano.

  2. #2
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    Apples to apples

  3. #3
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    Ford vs. Chevy

    Coke vs. Pepsi
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    Do you like 1:1 actuation or 2:1 actuation? Do you even notice a difference?
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    Between those 2 bikes I'd be more interested in the difference in the fork (Rockshock vs Fox) and the Brakes (shimano vs elixir).

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    I dont know what you mean by actuation.
    This always happens; I start looking at upgrades before I even get the damn thing and then I end up spending the money for the better components anyway!

    I'm ok with the Avids, finesse does more for me in that department but I like all my components to be consistant.

    Thats why I was asking the diff. SLX or XT, x7 vs XT vs SLX

    I'll trade the RockShox up, same as the SRAM, for a carbon fork before I trade - and Fox doesn't make a carbon fork.

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    I had a fully Shimano XT bike, and went to a fully SRAM X7/X9 bike. Other than the triggers being thumb only on the SRAM, I couldn't tell you an appreciable difference. My shifters and front derailleur are X7 and my rear derailleur is X9... I thought I'd be annoyed with the shifters and replace them fairly quickly, but I've had absolutely no reason to do so - they work great.

    However, when it comes to brakes, I had a ton of problems with the new Elixir 5s, had to get them re-bled a couple times, and they just weren't working well (and I stuck one of the levers about 3 inches into my calf and ended up in the ER, so it got personal ), so I went to Shimano XT brakes about 3 weeks ago. I think they are just massively better - great levers, tons of power, good throw. The LBS reports that they have seen a ton of problems with the last year's Elixirs.

    I also have ridden both of those forks, and I was not a huge fan of the RockShox fork... they just don't seem to be on the same level.

    However... it's all pretty good stuff. I honestly wouldn't worry. If you want to spend money on components, the cheapest time to do it is when you buy a new bike. If you can afford the Elite, get it. If you can't, enjoy the other one - I've demo'd the Rumblefish, and it's a fun bike. $500 ain't peanuts!

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    I'd pick the Shimano brakes over the Avids. If you ride a lot, you'll spend less time monkeying around with the Shimanos.
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    Quote Originally Posted by kosmo View Post
    I'd pick the Shimano brakes over the Avids. If you ride a lot, you'll spend less time monkeying around with the Shimanos.
    +1
    Shimano SLX/XT/XTR brakes are the way to go right now.

  10. #10
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    Avid brakes = noise, has to be the number one complaint.
    Rock Shox vs Fox fork, I have one of each and I really am enjoying the Fox on my Camber, but I felt the same way about my Reba on my Stumpjumper after the Tora on my Rockhopper. I have read complaints about Fox not being as customer oriented as Rock Shox when it comes to repairs but have not had to go down that road.
    Drive train, have Sram and Shimano and both are excellent.
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  11. #11
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    Nice. Good advice

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    Was running my bike with a xo setup(thought id try a new group-- tired of shimano).. Hated the sram brakes so changed them to shimano---which worked perfect with way more modulation and power and no noise-- marke one up for the big S... Didnt like the thumb shifters-- so changed them and the rear der to xt... Love the way you can either push or pull on the xt shifters to shift-- so ended up liking those better then the xo stuff--another one for the big S... So when all was done i realize--- shimano-- that is how im going to go from now on.. I tried to talk myself into liking other things and trying other things and always seeming to come back to the big S for stuff that works better-- smoother and easier imho.. GL whatever you pick..

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    good post

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    Quote Originally Posted by SB Trails View Post
    Was running my bike with a xo setup(thought id try a new group-- tired of shimano).. Hated the sram brakes so changed them to shimano---which worked perfect with way more modulation and power and no noise-- marke one up for the big S... Didnt like the thumb shifters-- so changed them and the rear der to xt... Love the way you can either push or pull on the xt shifters to shift-- so ended up liking those better then the xo stuff--another one for the big S... So when all was done i realize--- shimano-- that is how im going to go from now on.. I tried to talk myself into liking other things and trying other things and always seeming to come back to the big S for stuff that works better-- smoother and easier imho.. GL whatever you pick..
    Same, my Stumpjumper had X9/X7 mix with Elixir 7 brakes, my new Tallboy is all XT. Yes it's personal preference, but I won't bother with Sram/Avid again, much happier with my XT.
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    I had Shimano for many years and was also nervous to try Sram. But after using Sram I am more comfortable because my two fingers never come off the brakes levers as Sram is all thumb controlled. It really is a Ford vs Chevy arguement...

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    Yes, it is Coke vs Pepsi.... with one exception

    I know that it is mostly irrelevant for purchase - but service consideration. Shimano - absolute worst chains - last 1000 km at the best. SRAM little bit better, but more expensive. My solution, which took me a while to discover: KMC chains, the same price as SRAM, but last easily over 2k km, even more.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simpledesign View Post
    Do you like 1:1 actuation or 2:1 actuation? Do you even notice a difference?
    No real difference with 10-speed (the brands are still not interchangeable)
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    IMHO, and I run XT shifters and F&R D's and brakes....... The XT brakes are the best. Both my local LBS's say they have nothing but complaints about Avid brakes. I know how bad they are since I switched to XT myself.

    Shimano needs more tweeking to keep it shifting smoothly. My friends have X7/X9 on their bikes and it shifts much more smoothly and seems to shift better overall to me. Sram is more of a set it and forget it shifter mechanism from what I've seen.

    I'm planning on Sram shifters and Sram F&R D's with XT brakes on my next bike.

  19. #19
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    SRAM Chains
    SRAM Drivetrain
    Shimano Brakes

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    Quote Originally Posted by excaliber View Post
    I

    I'm planning on Sram shifters and Sram F&R D's with XT brakes on my next bike.
    Ditto

  21. #21
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    KMC chain
    X0 drivetrain
    Hope brakes
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  22. #22
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    I ran Shimano all the way back to 1995. Did a few parking lot rides on SRAM bikes and didn't like it. However I recently got a bike that was what I wanted except it had SRAM on it - X7 RD with X5 shifters. It was awkward for all of 15 minutes. After 2 rides, the pathways in my brain were all set for thumb shifting, so no need to think about it anymore. I'm surprised to find that I don't ever want to go back to finger triggers. I like using my index fingers for braking only, and thumbs for shifting.

    So now I've been brainwashed and have become one of "them", you know, a member of the SRAM cult. Beware blasphemers - you could be next!

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    Why is there so little competition in the drive train market? Only Sram and shimano on mtb's. One would think that other companies would try to get a slice of the cake.

  24. #24
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    I'd get the cheaper one,

    Replace the Brakes (probably with Magura as I like them better than Avids, and just as good for MUCH less than the Shimano's)

    Replace the Fork with a Manitou Tower Pro.... (though not sure how that will work with Trek's G2 Geo...? )

    I agree with everyone that the chain would quickly be replace either way with a KMC, though I'd just use the stock one, just expect a very short life span of it, or save it for a back up.

    Sell off the take off's and get a better bike for less than the elite


    I do prefer SRAM drivetrain over Shimmy's, as much for replacement pricing as well as actual function. Sram in general is cheaper to fix/replace when the dreaded rear derailleur trail snake attacks

    Honestly, I don't see a $600 value increase of the Elite no matter what... I'd just get the regular one
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  25. #25
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    SRAM always felt heavy to me at the shift lever. Shimano takes a lot less effort to shift.

    Also, SRAM chains seemed to always wear out fast on me. I get way more life out of XT and XTR chains, like they last me twice as long before hitting the wear limit... Cassettes too.

  26. #26
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    Personally, I would have no problem choosing a bike with SRAM or shimano components. Its like comparing a ford to a chevy. Some people prefer one over the other but they both get the job done. I always end up basing my complete build purchases strictly on the frame, not the component package. Although, I will always spend an extra couple hundred if the suspension is a huge upgrade. I do this because i end up replacing components as they break for higher end stuff anyways...so in the end, I end up with the top of the line model without the initial investment.

    For me, I have a lot of fun wrenching on my bike and upgrading components. It increases my overall experience, and helps me stay up-to-date with new technology.

    More often then not, I usually choose the shimano stuff. I feel like you get more bang for your buck with shimano when comparing the more budget friendly parts (XT/SLX or SRAMs equivalents). For the extremely expensive/high end components, I do think SRAM is a little more innovative. If money was no factor, I'd definitely consider SRAMs top shelf products....but I've been extremely happy with XT components. I just can't justify spending 3-5x more only to shave a few extra grams while sacrificing durability.

  27. #27
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    Sram for the reason of gripshift x9 / xo are superb. Shimano xt brake are stellar. I agree with kmc chains too.
    Shimano xt cassettes are better compared to Sram equivalent.

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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by drz400sm View Post
    Personally, I would have no problem choosing a bike with SRAM or shimano components. Its like comparing a ford to a chevy. Some people prefer one over the other but they both get the job done. I always end up basing my complete build purchases strictly on the frame, not the component package. Although, I will always spend an extra couple hundred if the suspension is a huge upgrade. I do this because i end up replacing components as they break for higher end stuff anyways...so in the end, I end up with the top of the line model without the initial investment.

    For me, I have a lot of fun wrenching on my bike and upgrading components. It increases my overall experience, and helps me stay up-to-date with new technology.

    More often then not, I usually choose the shimano stuff. I feel like you get more bang for your buck with shimano when comparing the more budget friendly parts (XT/SLX or SRAMs equivalents). For the extremely expensive/high end components, I do think SRAM is a little more innovative. If money was no factor, I'd definitely consider SRAMs top shelf products....but I've been extremely happy with XT components. I just can't justify spending 3-5x more only to shave a few extra grams while sacrificing durability.
    ya... they both work just fine... but I kinda feel the opposite from the bold-ed statement..

    I find I can usually get Sram drive train parts in equal classes for about 2/3 the cost. Though the price diff seems to be closing as I see the Sram stuff going up in price and the Shimano stuff slightly dropping lately.. I do look for Last Yr's model stuff a lot which is part of it as it seems SRAM likes to over produce and flood the market so left overs can be had much more easily. Example, I just got a 990 cassette for 55 bucks shipped...
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  29. #29
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    Drivetrain wise I think SRAM wins in the bling bling stakes at the high end otherwise no difference. I have ridden and will continue to ride both no real preference, I generally ride shimano more as I build my own bikes and the LBS 400yds away is a Shimano dealer, he gives me a very good price on stuff.

  30. #30
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    Gripshift always made my hand go numb. Never ponied up for the low profile covers though.

  31. #31
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    I will say that Shimano brakes, whilst heavier, tend to be more reliable and are definitely easier to bleed.

  32. #32
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    I would say test the SRAM, have heard great comments on their latest drivetrains

    SLX 2013's drivetrain looks great, almost like the last XT

  33. #33
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    The regular rumblefish doesn't have a tapered stem on the fork, or the 142 rear axle also.

  34. #34
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    Rule of thumb...
    SRAM for 29ers
    Shimano for 26ers

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by VFRLuke View Post
    The regular rumblefish doesn't have a tapered stem on the fork, or the 142 rear axle also.
    The base model RF got a tapered steerer for 2013.
    Worked at Trek/Fisher dealer 2008-2013. Only a little biased.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by blunderbuss View Post
    The base model RF got a tapered steerer for 2013.
    I stand corrected

  37. #37
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    search sram vs shimano on youtube

    SRAM vs Shimano Rear Derailleur Test - YouTube
    Keep trying to do the awesomest thing you've ever done.

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    Help me out folks.

    When I was riding a lot the order of parts from lowest quality to highest:

    Shimano STX, --- LX, --- XT, --- XTR!!

    We all wanted xtr but could rarely afford it at 18 years old.

    What has changed and which order does sram have theres in?

  39. #39
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    double post - sorry

  40. #40
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    My Carve expert came with all Deore, save for the rear derailer (XT) I have now bought the XT shifters and I am looking at XT brakes. Crank set will stay deore hollow tech and rotors will stay as well, front derailer is also staying. This is costing about $70 for the shifters and $129 X2 for the brakes. I will stop there and look for a better fork in the future but the Recon Silver is not too bad for what I am doing at this time.

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  41. #41
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    I also think its as close as the MTB world gets to a Ford vs. Chevy debate. I've always been a Shimano rider, and have 2009 Dura Ace stuff on my road bike. My 29er came with 2012 Sram x7 though, and I ended up liking it a lot, so much that I just upgraded to x0 rather than make a change to Shimano.

    I think either companies offerings in the upper end tiers that most serious riders consider will serve someone well. Appearances and shifter style are personal preference. I think far more important on any drivetrain is that it is well adjusted, maintained, has good cables and routing, and the rider has learned a correct shifting style.

    An XTR or XX drivetrain that's out of adjustment and is trying to be ham-fisted through a poor or cross chained gear ratio with a ton of torque on the pedals will never perform as requested.

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