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  1. #1
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    Seriously, what's your opinion on the best 29'er/ tires/rims/ and components?

    Ok experts, I've been on this website all of 6 weeks talking about my problems with spending $3K on a new mountain bike only to have the rims and tires fail in just 8 months. There have been numerous replies and I've appreciated most of them. I solved my problem thanks to some of you, but I have to ask, in your opinion, what's the best stock 29'er for the average rider? I'm not talking about buying a bike and then upgrading tires, rims, etc. Just "out of the store" value.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by rmoore View Post
    Ok experts, I've been on this website all of 6 weeks talking about my problems with spending $3K on a new mountain bike only to have the rims and tires fail in just 8 months. There have been numerous replies and I've appreciated most of them. I solved my problem thanks to some of you, but I have to ask, in your opinion, what's the best stock 29'er for the average rider? I'm not talking about buying a bike and then upgrading tires, rims, etc. Just "out of the store" value.
    There isn't, you're too fixated on the fact you bent a wheel on a 3k bike. It's mountain biking, **** happens. Fix it and move on. A $1000+ dollar wheelset will bend if you mess up.
    13 Lenz Lunchbox punkass

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by rmoore View Post
    Ok experts, I've been on this website all of 6 weeks talking about my problems with spending $3K on a new mountain bike only to have the rims and tires fail in just 8 months. There have been numerous replies and I've appreciated most of them. I solved my problem thanks to some of you, but I have to ask, in your opinion, what's the best stock 29'er for the average rider? I'm not talking about buying a bike and then upgrading tires, rims, etc. Just "out of the store" value.
    No bike is bulletproof.

    Give me a tank and I can find a man that can break it.

  4. #4
    Crash Dummy In Training
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    as said above
    You can spend $10,000 and still break stuff
    ​​
    2012 Stump Jumper Comp 29'er H.T.
    1997 Rock Hopper / Manitou TI Bulge Fork / Shimano STX-3 x 7 P.O.S.​

  5. #5
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    Generic response:

    My {Insert MTB model} is the best one out there. Coincidentally, it is the one I own.


    Word to the wise,,,only you can tell what is best for you...based upon your level, what you ride, what you expect from a ride, how much you want to spend, etc., etc., etc.

    Everyone's opinion suits them and not you.

  6. #6
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    I've been riding the O.E. Bontrager Race wheelset that came on my bike back in 04 with no issues. They've never even been trued once. I can't imagine that the wheels being spec'ed these days are any worse.
    Editor In Chief, "Internet Tough Guy Magazine"
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  7. #7
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    Breaking stuff is part of skill development and learning. Ride lighter with finesse over rocks and you need less and end up faster.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by SandSpur View Post
    No bike is bulletproof.

    Give me a tank and I can find a man that can break it.
    Exactly! Put a mountain biker in a room with 2 bowling balls and we'll break one and lose the other.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by rmoore View Post
    Maybe I should keep riding my 2007 Gary Fisher which cost me $500 and has caused me no problems. More $$$ seems to cause more problems.
    Apparently a $500 GF.

    TwoTone summed it up nice. No such thing as "bulletproof" or "bombproof".

  10. #10
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    My opinion on the best 29er cassettes is to go for Ultegra 11-30, but 105 works in a pinch.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  11. #11
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    When I posted this question I figured these were the kind of responses I'd get. The post about the GF $500 was the best. My first mountain bike has been bullet proof. I've since had a GF Cobia 29'er and now a Scott Scale 930 Carbon 29'er. Couldn't help but start upgrading.

    The Scott has had some problems due to non-tubeless ready rims and flexible Rocket Ron tires.

    I've now spent an additional $400 for Stan's rims and Maxxis tires. All is well.

    I think it's interesting that mtn bikes are so different from road bikes. Been a road biker for 40 years and have gotten what I paid for. Not so with mtn bikes. The more I spend on mtn bikes the less reliable and durable they are. I guess it's just a different animal. My last road bike was a 2003 Lemond. Still riding it with absolutely no malfunctions. Haven't even had a flat. 2,000 miles last year, not even an adjustment needed.

    Love mtn biking but it's been a constant battle with bike malfunctions. I know, most of you will tell me to stay away from mtn biking and stick to road. I just can't figure out why the bike manufacturers can't build a reliable mtn bike. Especially when spending $3k for my last one.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by rmoore View Post
    When I posted this question I figured these were the kind of responses I'd get. The post about the GF $500 was the best. My first mountain bike has been bullet proof. I've since had a GF Cobia 29'er and now a Scott Scale 930 Carbon 29'er. Couldn't help but start upgrading.

    The Scott has had some problems due to non-tubeless ready rims and flexible Rocket Ron tires.

    I've now spent an additional $400 for Stan's rims and Maxxis tires. All is well.

    I think it's interesting that mtn bikes are so different from road bikes. Been a road biker for 40 years and have gotten what I paid for. Not so with mtn bikes. The more I spend on mtn bikes the less reliable and durable they are. I guess it's just a different animal. My last road bike was a 2003 Lemond. Still riding it with absolutely no malfunctions. Haven't even had a flat. 2,000 miles last year, not even an adjustment needed.

    Love mtn biking but it's been a constant battle with bike malfunctions. I know, most of you will tell me to stay away from mtn biking and stick to road. I just can't figure out why the bike manufacturers can't build a reliable mtn bike. Especially when spending $3k for my last one.
    You cant compare road biking to mountain biking..

    I race XC and spend a lot of my time road biking to get the hours in.... You can get away with many weak components on the road. Hell, I could probably buy a walmart bike and ride it forever on the road. Offroad? not so much.. its tougher on bikes and your body...

    I spend 1/3 less than your $3000 mountain bike, and dont have anywhere close to the massive problems you seem to have.. but once you get more skill riding offroad, you wont keep breaking wheels.. A ROMB always seem to have these problems when they first get started. This isnt road biking
    Put a mountain biker in a room with 2 bowling balls and we'll break one and lose the other - GelatiCruiser

  13. #13
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    You keep bringing up $3k like it's a lot to spend on a bike nowadays. Middle of the line with mediocre components usually.

    And because the obvious obviously needs to be stated here: you're riding a mountain bike. Stuff will break, and will continue to break. Part of the sport. Get out while you can.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by rmoore View Post
    When I posted this question I figured these were the kind of responses I'd get. The post about the GF $500 was the best. My first mountain bike has been bullet proof. I've since had a GF Cobia 29'er and now a Scott Scale 930 Carbon 29'er. Couldn't help but start upgrading.

    The Scott has had some problems due to non-tubeless ready rims and flexible Rocket Ron tires.

    I've now spent an additional $400 for Stan's rims and Maxxis tires. All is well.

    I think it's interesting that mtn bikes are so different from road bikes. Been a road biker for 40 years and have gotten what I paid for. Not so with mtn bikes. The more I spend on mtn bikes the less reliable and durable they are. I guess it's just a different animal. My last road bike was a 2003 Lemond. Still riding it with absolutely no malfunctions. Haven't even had a flat. 2,000 miles last year, not even an adjustment needed.

    Love mtn biking but it's been a constant battle with bike malfunctions. I know, most of you will tell me to stay away from mtn biking and stick to road. I just can't figure out why the bike manufacturers can't build a reliable mtn bike. Especially when spending $3k for my last one.
    How far off the ground are you getting when you hit a nice big speed bump on that 2003 Lemond 2-3 ft of air?

    There are plenty of reliable mountain bikes. I've been mountain biking since the late 90's BMXing before that. Just about every bike has been very reliable.
    Have I broken things- yes, 'mountain bike' doesn't equal bullet proof tank. Every time I broken/bent something it's been my mistake.

    Maybe you should stick to road, all you've done since joining this forum is ***** about unreliable mountain bikes. Save yourself the hassle and expense, this hobby isn't for you.
    13 Lenz Lunchbox punkass

  15. #15
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    I think you may be looking at this wrong - typically, the more you spend on a bike, the lighter the components are, and as such, they may be less resistant to a miscue, especially in the area of wheels and tires. My guess (assumption on my part) is that when the manufacturers sell a bike for 3k, they assume a new rider will not be buying it, and a more experienced rider can avoid some of the things that may tear it up, making the lifespan of the lighter components acceptable.
    At some point on the dollar and weight scale you go from components that can take a beating and keep going, to lightweight "race" parts that are not as durable, but lighter and let you go faster.
    Mtb riding is quite a bit tougher on components due to the large variability of terrain and obstacles.
    Last edited by willworkforbeer; 09-11-2013 at 01:56 PM.
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by phsycle View Post
    You keep bringing up $3k like it's a lot to spend on a bike nowadays. Middle of the line with mediocre components usually.

    And because the obvious obviously needs to be stated here: you're riding a mountain bike. Stuff will break, and will continue to break. Part of the sport. Get out while you can.
    Didn't mean to piss anybody off. $3k was a lot of money to me. My bike was more than my truck. Didn't think I'd have to upgrade right away.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by rmoore View Post
    Didn't mean to piss anybody off. $3k was a lot of money to me. My bike was more than my truck. Didn't think I'd have to upgrade right away.
    Not pissed off, personally. You just came off sounding like a weenie, and someone who didn't do much research before buying? Live and learn, as my wife says. She also called me a weenie yesterday because I had a headache and couldn't move.

    Good luck with your MTB venture. I ride road as well, and my 83 Trek still rides butter smooth. My 08 Karate Monkey had its fair share of replaced components already.

  18. #18
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    3k doesn't make your bike bulletproof, it just makes it nicer and lighter. You can dent and break any wheel pretty easily if u do it wrong. Pinkbike destroyed an ENVE DH wheel in their official test write up.

    Comparing road bikes to mountain bikes and biking is comparing apples and oranges.

  19. #19
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    So to sum it up, learn to ride light and you'll be less likely to break stuff. Finesse isn't exactly part of the average roadies vernacular.
    I do agree with you that 3k is a lot of money to drop on a bike. Sure the prices just keep climbing from there (just for fun I spec'ed out a Trek Fuel 29 and it almost hit 11k ), but 3k should still land you a very solid, competent ride.
    You really just need to focus on being light and loose on the bike and the rest of your issues will go away. You'll find that you'll get faster too.
    Editor In Chief, "Internet Tough Guy Magazine"
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  20. #20
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    I am going to disagree with most of the comments posted here--with the utmost of respect of course.

    Your bike shop sold you a bike designed for a cross country racer on a budget.... You can get a very sturdy almost unbreakable full suspension for 3000 bucks.

    This coming from a guy who is about to drop bank on a tbltc with carbon rims....

  21. #21
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    Yeah...two dif machines for two dif purposes. One weighing a lot more than the other.

    The lesson should be: Don't do whatever it is u did to dent that wheel because that wheel isn't all that different from the majority of other wheels out there.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by cptjack View Post
    I am going to disagree with most of the comments posted here--with the utmost of respect of course.

    Your bike shop sold you a bike designed for a cross country racer on a budget.... You can get a very sturdy almost unbreakable full suspension for 3000 bucks.

    This coming from a guy who is about to drop bank on a tbltc with carbon rims....
    You really don't know what you're talking about.
    13 Lenz Lunchbox punkass

  23. #23
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    It's like buying furniture...just because it's expensive, doesn't mean it's pretty and has better longevity and a better warranty.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwoTone View Post
    You really don't know what you're talking about.
    How so?

  25. #25
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    I suspect that most of the 3k cost on the bike was in the carbon frame; had you purchased a similar bike without the carbon frame it probably would have been half the cost.
    Lightweight = high dollar
    The Scott Scale 930 has a decent component set, but is no better than the $1500 version in aluminum - you paid a bunch for the frame.
    Does not make it a bad bike, but you have to realize where the money is in a bike.
    To address a specific issue, that bike has Rocket Ron tires - great tires, but maybe not the most durable.
    Not familiar with the wheelset, but if they are like some of the other Scott bikes, they have a weight limit - not the heaviest duty wheel - more of a race wheel.
    Does not make it a bad bike, but you have to realize it's purpose.
    Women and cats will do as they please, and men and dogs should relax and get used to the idea.
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