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  1. #1
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    Rough Pedal Bearings

    I bought a pair of gusset Slim Jim SC's

    Gusset Slim Jim SC Platform Pedals Black | eBay

    that pair to be precise! and the bearings are very rough and i can feel the pedals wanting to stop as i spin them (with my hand, not installed on a bike yet). this is my first set of pedals and the ebay ad states that they are "A new, unused item with absolutely no signs of wear." and that they came off of a demo bike.

    so, this being my first set of pedals i dont know if this is kosher or not. they might have been sitting around for a while and gotten like that and i dont know if i can just ride the rough out or what.

    would hitting them with WD-40 be a bad idea?

    why cant it ever be easy!! thanks everyone.
    Last edited by skikarl; 12-30-2013 at 07:11 PM.

  2. #2
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    Do not use wd40. It is more of a solvent cleaner than a lubricant. Also I believe those have sealed bearings so you shouldn't need to lubricate. Not quite sure what you mean that you can feel them wanting to stop. A lot of times pedals and ther bearings wil be somewhat "stiff". You want a smooth rotation more than a free spin. As long as they aren't binding or grinding I'd say ride them.

    Maybe someone with some direct experience with this particular brand can chime in.
    Sent via my heady vibes from the heart of Pisgahstan

  3. #3
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    link does not work.

    never, EVER use traditional WD-40 to "lube"" anything on your bike! WD-40 is the fastest way to ruin any moving part on your bike. Google "WD-40 is not lube" and you will find 100 reasons why. the WD-40 company now makes various bicycle specific lubes, but regular old WD should stay far, far away from your bicycle except perhaps to install rubber grips (yes, it works. counterintuitive but it works).

    adjusting pedal bearings is a huge PITA, but fortunately, you have sealed bearings in those pedals. it's usually expected that pedals will be a bit tight. they should not spin freely- they don't need to. however, if they feel stiff enough that you're afraid they will "roll" under your feet, this could cause big problems. you can ride them for a bit and see how they feel on the bike under your feet. if they still feel super stiff, you should be able to remove that end cap and loosen a nut on the end of the pedal to free them up. I am not sure how those pedals are adjusted but most of them work like that.

    grease the threads on your pedals with thick grease before screwing them into your cranks. tighten them HARD so they cannot possibly rattle loose.

  4. #4
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    I figured wd40 would be bad because it's a water displacer. They don't feel stiff enough to roll what soever. Just not free spinning . they have like rough spots. Where they will spin and then stop them self. After spinning them a lot they are a bit better. I figured that might be what pedals do. I complained about it to the seller and he is giving me $15 back. So they were only $30.

    Sent from my GT-I9505G using Tapatalk

  5. #5
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    that sounds like every pedal I have ever touched except a few very high-end pedals. put them on your bike and ride them a few times. they should free up a bit, but pedals that twirl freely are actually kind scary. smooth, not fast, is how pedals should feel.

  6. #6
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    Thanks for the input everyone. i edited the link in the OP so it should work now (not that it matters).


    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    smooth, not fast, is how pedals should feel.
    "smooth" is not the word that i would think of when describing these. i think they will smooth out with some riding. if not, screw it they were only $30. ill buy saints in the summer if i need to!

  7. #7
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    unscrew the end cap and see if there's some sort of nut or bolt in there. if you can access it, hold the pedal spindle still and loosen the bolt/nut a tiny bit, like 1/64 of a turn. loosen that adjustment until they are just loose enough to be smooth but not free-spinning. it's so easy, even a Caveman could do it!

  8. #8
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    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    unscrew the end cap and see if there's some sort of nut or bolt in there. if you can access it, hold the pedal spindle still and loosen the bolt/nut a tiny bit, like 1/64 of a turn. loosen that adjustment until they are just loose enough to be smooth but not free-spinning. it's so easy, even a Caveman could do it!
    stunning. worked flawlessly. REPPIN


    EDIT: side note, From wd-40s website:

    Myth:WD-40 Multi-Use Product should not be used on bike chains.Fact:
    While WD-40 Multi-Use Product it is not a grease, it is formulated with strong lubricating oils and other ingredients, and is a terrific product to use for bike maintenance. It does not attract dirt or moisture to metal surfaces just be sure to wipe off any excessWD-40 Multi-Use Product before riding.

    .

  9. #9
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    Regardless of what the company says on their website, there is a long list of better lubricants than WD-40. I personally won't use it on anything. If you just want something that is cheap and readily available you can get Liquid Wrench brand chain lube at most auto parts stores and it very cost effective and comes in a large can. I'm not one of those guys that thinks I can only use oils and greases that are made or marketed by a company in the biking industry. I use Lucas Red and Tacky grease on my bike wheel bearings. If it's good enough to protect boat trailer bearings that are exposed to water and roll down the highway at 75 mph I know it will handle anything my bike throws. There are lots of good commercial lubricants available that will take care of your chain but WD-40 would not be on my short list.

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