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  1. #1
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    Is this rim all done, or can this be repaired?

    Bit of a newbie question here, so apologies in advance.

    Had a relatively easy OTB today (stick caught my rear wheel, bike stopped, I didn't...) and though everything else was fine, I half-landed on my front wheel and it's a tad (ok, a lot) on the wobbly side.

    Is this something that a LBS can straighten out? I don't have a truing stand, though I gave it a few with a spoke wrench and didn't have a hell of a lot of luck. The spokes that I'd normally loosen to pull the hop out are all tight as hell.

    Is this wheel hosed? - YouTube

    Does that seem like it's new rim time, or is this a pretty common fix?
    // Chris - Boston, MA
    // '13 Cannondale Scalpel 29'er
    // '15 Specialized Fatboy
    Metalguitarist.org

  2. #2
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    looks fixable to me

  3. #3
    Trail Ninja
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    I would generalize that the LBS needs to be liable for what they advise, so they'd lean on the safe side since they don't know what the wheel's been through and would likely recommend replacement. Considering alloy stuff has limited fatigue life, especially low cost lightweight alloy stuff, and that bending that rim back pretty much takes a chunk out of that fatigue life, that rim will not ever be like it used to. They can't judge how much damage has been caused and how much life is left in it, but you should know what it's been through and the choice is ultimately up to you. If you know you haven't been abusing it (drops, jumps, plowing into rocks/logs at high speed), you can get it to be straighter, at the cost of more frequent wheel tune-ups, perhaps due to uneven spoke tension needed to get such wobbles straightened.

  4. #4
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    Just about any wheel can be straightened. Whether or not it can be trued and still be strong depends entirely on how relatively even the spoke tension is after it is straightened. If one side has to be pulled much tighter than the other in order to get the rim true then it will always be weak and unstable. I'm guessing you're due for a new rim.

  5. #5
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    Thanks guys. I'm by no means a hardcore rider, and this wheel is about a month old. If it's never going to be 100% again, I'll probably just have them swap the rim out and rebuild it. I'm trying to eyeball where the hop is, but it's more than just the one hop - it has somewhat of a twist in it.

    Bike's brand new, rider is old, haha.
    // Chris - Boston, MA
    // '13 Cannondale Scalpel 29'er
    // '15 Specialized Fatboy
    Metalguitarist.org

  6. #6
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    Id say its repairable to a point, as the others are saying, never be 100% again and depends on what type of riding you do, how big of guy you are etc. Im a clyde, at that much of a bend Id replace, but I wouldnt be beyond getting it back straight and riding it for a bit while saving for something better. Hell I had a wheel about that bad, worse or better cant remember, straightened and rode it for sometime till I saved for a new bike.
    Trek Marlin 29er

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  7. #7
    1*14*29*2.1 & 1*1*29*2.4
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    that wheel could be totally fine. If you have broken a spoke which is likely if you had a stick in it, replacing the spoke will do a lot. even if it never comes back to perfect it can still be a good wheel, but you just need someone to look at it.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seventh-777 View Post
    I'll probably just have them swap the rim out and rebuild it.
    It will be more cost effective to buy a new wheel. A new rim, spokes, nipples, and labor will likely cost as much or more than a new wheel - with a better hub than you have now.

    LBS may be able to keep the wheel alive. The video is not conclusive.

    We used to have a technique dubbed the "magic carpet ride" to correct some bent rims. A "magic carpet ride" was holding the wheel and hitting it (hard) sideways on a carpet. Then, you do what you could to true it with some semblance of equal spoke tension.

  9. #9
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    Build a Stand and learn to true wheels yourself.

  10. #10
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    It might be fixable. Especially if it has a broken spoke.
    But after I looked at the youtube clip twice, I got sick and boiled over on my keybord. My keybord cannot be repaired.

  11. #11
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I have a "no internet videos" policy. If it can be trued acceptably, I'd give a fix a shot.

    Unless you have expensive hubs it's more cost-effective to buy complete wheels than a rim, spokes, and a builder's time.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by crit_boy View Post
    We used to have a technique dubbed the "magic carpet ride" to correct some bent rims. A "magic carpet ride" was holding the wheel and hitting it (hard) sideways on a carpet. Then, you do what you could to true it with some semblance of equal spoke tension.
    I've straightened an awful lot of bent wheels using a higher tech version of that method. I would mark the mid-point of the bend and insert that section of the rim into a slot (think large coin slot) that I built under my bench. I could fairly accurately take out the bend and get the rim pretty straight before even touching a spoke. I kept a lot of wheels on the road this way for people who didn't have the cash to fork out for a new one.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    I would mark the mid-point of the bend and insert that section of the rim into a slot (think large coin slot) that I built under my bench. I could fairly accurately take out the bend and get the rim pretty straight before even touching a spoke.
    Good idea. Thanks for sharing.

  14. #14
    Big Gulps, Alright!
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    Looks knackered to me. You're going to have crazy high spoke tension in some spots in order to true it, and you will have uneven spoke tension throughout. Even if you can true it, it will fail again.

  15. #15
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    My i23 WTB looked just like that, I tried for an hour to get it true and was close but the spoke tension was all over the place. Get a new wheel, If it was fixed I wouldn't trust it.

  16. #16
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    That's exactly what happened at the LBS. They managed to straighten it out, but spoke tension was just as you said - all over the place. I ended up getting a new wheel (one of these) that the LBS had in stock. I figure the old one will make a decent enough passable spare in case I taco another one on an overnight trip or so.
    // Chris - Boston, MA
    // '13 Cannondale Scalpel 29'er
    // '15 Specialized Fatboy
    Metalguitarist.org

  17. #17
    ballbuster
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seventh-777 View Post
    Bit of a newbie question here, so apologies in advance.

    Had a relatively easy OTB today (stick caught my rear wheel, bike stopped, I didn't...) and though everything else was fine, I half-landed on my front wheel and it's a tad (ok, a lot) on the wobbly side.

    Is this something that a LBS can straighten out? I don't have a truing stand, though I gave it a few with a spoke wrench and didn't have a hell of a lot of luck. The spokes that I'd normally loosen to pull the hop out are all tight as hell.

    Is this wheel hosed? - YouTube

    Does that seem like it's new rim time, or is this a pretty common fix?
    I think it's likely done. You're not going to iron that out by adjusting spokes alone. Problem is, the rim is bent and has a new shape. It ain't going back unless you bend it back, which of course, weakens it.

    Try this to get close (some NSFW Language) and then adjust it the rest of the way with the nipples.

    The real fun begins at 1:20:



    Then see how long it lasts. It might never be stable again, in which case replace the rim. Truth be told, I rode this wheel for another month after this, but it wasn't nearly as stiff as it used to be, and it drifted out of true.

  18. #18
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    I did that before when I tacoed my front wheel about 15 miles out. It was back in the rim brake days, even after I beat it to death I still had to remove my brakes to get the wheel to turn. It got me home but I had to walk down the decents and the ride throught the local park was interesting as I was coverd in black swamp mud and blood, was a hell of a wipe out.

  19. #19
    Professional Crastinator
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    I could fix that.



    Maybe this thread will help:

    "Can this wheel be fixed?" For Newbs

    -F
    It's never easier - you just go faster.

  20. #20
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    Could it be fixed? Perhaps. But with the pool of replacement parts that are available you probably can get a new wheel at a reasonable price. And like you said-have the LBS swap the rim out for a new one. With a rim that has a twist or multiple hops a coupe things come to mind. Is it spoke tension or is the rim bent? Also, is there a crack you cant see?
    What if you ride the same trail and that same vindictive jumps up and grabs that wheel and throws you to the ground again????? You will want fresh metal to help you out.



    Damn sticks

  21. #21
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    Is this rim all done, or can this be repaired?

    Funny story. I had a little crash today-jacked my rim-going shopping


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