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  1. #1
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    Is Rigid a viable option for me?

    Hello, I am looking for some more feedback from you guys about some suspension upgrades for my Scott scale 29er which has the Suntour XCR fork which believe it or not has been holding up pretty well but its time to go. I posted earlier this month asking opinions about the Suntour upgrade program, the Recon Gold tk solo air ($239.00) deal, Tower Pro and the Reba. I have been doing alot of paved/hardpack riding and just today rode 30 miles on the West Orange Trail (paved) and keep thinking about putting my bike on a diet? Any off road riding here in town is pretty tame, mostly flat hardpack, some sugar sand, and small roots/rocks plus my fork stays locked 90% of the time. I like the looks of the White Brothers & Shimano Pro Carbon forks. Any "rigid" riders out there please chime in please! Also keep in mind that I'm considered a "clydesdale", 6'5 & 235lbs. Thanks!

  2. #2
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    I love my rigid fork. I'm no clyde, but know several heavier riders who also ride rigid.. Our local trails are fairly technical singletrack (rocks, 1ft+ logs, roots,etc). It takes some getting used to, but it climbs great, is light, cheap, and is great on the road and hardpack. I think it sounds great for your application. If you want to try it for cheap, try the Salsa Cromoto Grande (29" version). I have that and it is nice ans smooth. Sub-1100 grams IIRC.

  3. #3
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    Lots of people like niners rigid carbon fork. On one has an inexpensive carbon fork..... rigid forks are great.

    Im not totally clear on what you mean by viable option. Yes you can run one but its more of a prefrence thing. I dont care how smooth your trails rigid feels differnt. I have a rigid and ride the piss out of it.

    If you get a chance just to roll around on a rigid i think youll know right away if you like it.

    Bike weight an issue? Go niner carbon rigid.

  4. #4
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    A night ride pic in houner of daylight savings..... dont let the trail dictate if you go rigid one way or the other even on hard pack the rigid feels way differnt

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fuglio View Post
    Lots of people like niners rigid carbon fork. On one has an inexpensive carbon fork..... rigid forks are great.

    Im not totally clear on what you mean by viable option. Yes you can run one but its more of a prefrence thing. I dont care how smooth your trails rigid feels differnt. I have a rigid and ride the piss out of it.

    If you get a chance just to roll around on a rigid i think youll know right away if you like it.

    Bike weight an issue? Go niner carbon rigid.
    I love the looks of the niner forks especially the naked version but they have a rider weight limit of 210, I'm 235. By viable option I guess I mean is it worth considering? I have been watching some you tube videos of rigid 29er hardtails and everyone seems to like the lighter front end after the swap. I will look into the on one, thanks.

  6. #6
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    My weight is comparable to yours. I like riding a rigid fork. At first I didn't think I was going to like it, but with the trade off in weight savings from a suspension fork, it became much more enjoyable of a ride. With the right wheelset and tires rigid can be even more enjoyable.

    I switched to a cromoto grande fork. A little pricy, yes, but definitely the right choice for me.
    "Ride what you love, love what you ride"

  7. #7
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    I stand corrected, after looking at the niner fork info again, there is no rider weight limit, only max rotor size of 185mm.

  8. #8
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    Go for it dude ... but be carefull once you go rigid the switch to single speed wont be far behind. have fun and set up your bike the way you like it. Defintetly a viable option

  9. #9
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    Go for the rigid fork....check out the Whiskey #7......I find myself locking out my Reba on my other bike more often now since going fully rigid on the single speed.......Clyde at 215 lbs.






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  10. #10
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    I weigh 250. Always got frustrated with my front suspension, probably due to my inability to give a proper tune, and I tried everything. My fork stayed locked most the time too, even on pretty techy stuff. As an experiment, I demoed a couple full suspension bikes, and I found them kind of boring because I'm old and not interested in doing crazy things on a bike. Felt like suspension was doing all the riding for me. Rigid makes me concentrate more while riding. Makes me think more about what the bike and myself can or can't do, and then forces me to adjust/adapt. I enjoy that.
    You're so cute internet tough guy. Noogie...Noogie...Noogie.

  11. #11
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    Another vote for the rigid ride! I've got a rockhopper HT 26er with a RS Dart (I think) and I really enjoy locking it out. It doesn't give a true rigid feel - still has some flex to it - but it is a noticeable difference in ride quality and climbing/tracking ability. Going tubeless and dropping the psi would be a nice improvement, too. Go for it, bro!

  12. #12
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    Go for it. If you end up not liking it you can always sell/trade for a nice suspension fork.
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  13. #13
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    Is Rigid a viable option for me?

    This subject seems totally dependent upon terrain. Sounds like for your situation rigid would work well for you.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by epicxt View Post
    This subject seems totally dependent upon terrain. Sounds like for your situation rigid would work well for you.
    That's what I was thinking too.
    :wq

  15. #15
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    The ability to ride rigid has more to do with the rider than the terrain.
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  16. #16
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    Is Rigid a viable option for me?

    Yes, but some terrain is better suited to rigid than others. This seems to be true from what the OP has described.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by epicxt View Post
    Yes, but some terrain is better suited to rigid than others. This seems to be true from what the OP has described.
    Before modern suspension tech was force fed to us by the industry to the point where we deemed it "necessary" to have all that crap to hit the trails, folks were riding rigid bikes everywhere and down everything. The only thing limiting a rigid bike is the rider.
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  18. #18
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    Is Rigid a viable option for me?

    Yes, I'm aware of this. My first mtb was in 1988. Fully rigid (of course). I'm just saying that folks use different horses for different courses. I can ride just about everything on my full rigid mtb that I can on my full squish, but I choose the bike that suits the terrain I'm planning on riding that day to maximize my fun.

  19. #19
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    "Is Rigid a viable option for me?"


    The answer is always "Yes!!!"

    I am still a little bit slower on average (descending mostly, almost make up for it climbing though) rigid, and I'm more beat up after a ride; however, I have much more fun, and that's really what I care about...

  20. #20
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    I have a SS with a origin8 black ops carbon fork. I love this bike. Between the 2.2 tubeless at low press and the carbon. It's a surprisingly smooth ride. Yet I still get all th power to the rear wheel
    Seeking MB-2 Fork (19.3), Ritchey FD post silver 26.8

  21. #21
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    My two main rides are a FS geared and a rigid SS. I like both. I would rather ride a rigid fork than a cheap suspension fork.

    The rigid SS will definitely beat me up and wear me out faster than the geared FS, but when I am riding it I really feel the trail and pay attention to lines and maintaining momentum and it is a really zen experience. When I am on my fully, it is usually about speed, flying downhill, and/or longer rides.

    I ride both of them on the same trails.

  22. #22
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    Another option to consider is a fat-front set-up or running one of the new Surly Knard 3.0" tires up front. I love a rigid bike but at my age and on the trails I ride a measly 2.4" tire at 20 psi on the front beats me up pretty bad. But a 3" Knard at 12 psi adds a lot more cush, and a 4" fat tire up front is darn plush (if a bit slow-rolling).

    I've gotten ride of all my squishy forks and now ride a Pugsley and 2 fat-front 29ers. Fair warning though - once you go fat, you never go back.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slow Danger View Post
    I weigh 250. Always got frustrated with my front suspension, probably due to my inability to give a proper tune, and I tried everything. My fork stayed locked most the time too, even on pretty techy stuff. As an experiment, I demoed a couple full suspension bikes, and I found them kind of boring because I'm old and not interested in doing crazy things on a bike. Felt like suspension was doing all the riding for me. Rigid makes me concentrate more while riding. Makes me think more about what the bike and myself can or can't do, and then forces me to adjust/adapt. I enjoy that.
    This is me too, I got rid of the suspension all together because I only have X amount of trails to ride and suspension made them to point and shoot. Now each time I ride it is a seriously intensive experience, I find new lines and I am constantly aiming to clean sections without a dab. It is more challenging for me and that is why I ride a mountain bike. If I want a more fitness intensive ride with a head down and hammer approach I will either ride our local high speed smooth single track trail or my road bike.

    Quote Originally Posted by jnroyal View Post
    Another option to consider is a fat-front set-up or running one of the new Surly Knard 3.0" tires up front. I love a rigid bike but at my age and on the trails I ride a measly 2.4" tire at 20 psi on the front beats me up pretty bad. But a 3" Knard at 12 psi adds a lot more cush, and a 4" fat tire up front is darn plush (if a bit slow-rolling).

    I've gotten ride of all my squishy forks and now ride a Pugsley and 2 fat-front 29ers. Fair warning though - once you go fat, you never go back.
    Fat front is great and with Maxxis about to release some 29er Tubeless compatible DH tires there will another option for people not willing to shell out for the Fat Front fork, wheel and tire combos. Stiff sidewalls and serious tread will really help compliance.
    Try this: HTFU

  24. #24
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    I think variety is the spice of life for this question. You have suspension, you want rigid. You switch to rigid, you might wish for 5" travel again. Solution: Get two bikes?

  25. #25
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    I love my fully rigid 29er. I generally don't have trouble keeping up with people up or down as long as the trail isn't insanely tech. I just deleted a bunch of pontifications that are better summed up by-GO FOR IT!

    It's always good to have a backup if the squishy fork blows up
    "Paved roads...just another example of needless government spending"—paraphrased from rhino_adv

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