Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    51

    Rigid fork install for RockHopper Comp 29er?

    Posted this over on the specialized forum, but didn't get any responses - any help would be greatly appreciated:

    I've recently acquired this bike, and I am very happy with most of it. I'm not particularly excited about the irritating investment of time that has to go into bleeding the hydros, if they really need annual bleeding, but I'm especially underwhelmed by the flexibility of the SR Suntour front fork (the front brake rubs whenever I'm leaning hard one way or the other, but is otherwise perfectly aligned). I am considering swapping it out for a rigid fork - I tend to spend more time on the tarmac/packed trails than off road these days, and should probably have opted for something without suspension (stupid hindsight!) - but I suspect that I might have to have the LBS do all the dirty work for me (despite the extravant cost of such an undertaking). I don't think I'm going to have much trouble finding a fork for a really low price, but just how involved is it to replace the fork? I know it's not just a matter of removing the stem and sliding out the old fork to replace it with the new one (that's what I'd like, though). It seems that I'll need a headset (or at least some replacement pieces from the current one) along with the new fork. Is this something that only a trained professional should undertake, or can a person with basic mechanical skills and a certain amount of intelligence (but no more) actually accomplish this task?

    Thanks in advance for any comments - even the funny ones!


  2. #2
    Riding rigid
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    177
    Swapping forks is easy. You'll have to knock out the lower headset race (usually pressed into the crown) and press it back on the new fork (you can use a 1.5 inch pvc pipe from the hardware store). Then the only other thing is trimming down your steerer tube (pipe cutter). Everything else is just bolt it back on.

  3. #3
    What could go wrong ...
    Reputation: Zoke2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,955
    +1 to what MTB Pharm said and make sure to measure the a2c on the fork you have to match it to the one you get to replace it
    I used to ride to Win ... Now I ride to Grin

    While my guitar gently weeps, my bike sits there mocking me

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 4nbstd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    607
    It's definitely doable with a person who has basic mechanical skills, but I can see why it could be overwhelming when doing it for the first time.

    Look up videos on Youtube, there are some kids doing the job, so I can't imagine it will be too hard.

    For me though, fork install is one of the things that I would pay to get it done than doing it myself, mostly because the LBS does it for $35 and I don't want to deal with it.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    51
    Quote Originally Posted by 4nbstd View Post
    For me though, fork install is one of the things that I would pay to get it done than doing it myself, mostly because the LBS does it for $35 and I don't want to deal with it.
    Seriously? $35?!?! That's what my lbs charges to have the brakes adjusted. I'm talking vbrakes, too. I'll have to check around for these videos on YouTube. Thanks everyone!

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    51
    Quote Originally Posted by MTB Pharm View Post
    Swapping forks is easy. You'll have to knock out the lower headset race (usually pressed into the crown) and press it back on the new fork (you can use a 1.5 inch pvc pipe from the hardware store). Then the only other thing is trimming down your steerer tube (pipe cutter). Everything else is just bolt it back on.
    So how much of the new headset would I have to buy, if any? Are there parts I need and parts that I can just reuse? The star nut, for example, must not be the sort of thng one just yanks out of the old steerer tube. Right?

  7. #7
    What could go wrong ...
    Reputation: Zoke2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,955
    Quote Originally Posted by dosland View Post
    So how much of the new headset would I have to buy, if any? Are there parts I need and parts that I can just reuse? The star nut, for example, must not be the sort of thng one just yanks out of the old steerer tube. Right?
    Yes you will need a star nut for the new fork but all you need to do is remove the race from the old fork and put it on the new fork ... no need to change anything on the headset
    I used to ride to Win ... Now I ride to Grin

    While my guitar gently weeps, my bike sits there mocking me

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nubster's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    3,983
    You might even score a free star nut from your LBS or at least cheap. Certainly they have some laying around from installing new headsets in frames that the forks didn't need a new star nut. I know I have several around here.
    Quote Originally Posted by Psycle151 View Post
    Friggin' coward. Give me a red chiclet instead of debating like a man. You don't deserve your green blocks.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 4nbstd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    607

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    51
    THanks, everyone, for these answers! Truly helpful stuff. I have a couple last questions before I jump off this cliff. First, what is my best material option (not really excited about carbon at this point, as the bike does spend a few hours every day in crowded bike racks) - from what I understand, I'm choosing between aluminum and steel. I do some single track riding, but spend far more time on the pavement/crushed limestone, so I'd just switch out the tires whenever I hit the trails. I'm 175lbs and 6ft, so I don't think my size/weight will have much affect on which material is most appropriate, but I'd like to have some opinions from people who have ridden both, or all three, I suppose. I rode an all steel hardrock (rigid) for 10 years, never had a problem until the derailleur hanger got destroyed in a nasty shifting disaster. That's about the extent of my experience with these mt bike gizmos!

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 4nbstd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    607
    I haven't been on aluminum rigid fork before, but I've been on both steel and aluminum frames, and currently ride steel frame with rigid steel fork (2010 Kona Unit). Based on my experience with frame alone, I would go with steel fork.

    (I'm not even sure if they make aluminum rigid fork for 29er? I don't think I've seen one before).

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    385
    You will also need a 185mm I.S. disc brake adapter, $11. Your current fork is post mount, most rigid's are I.S. mount. You will also need a star nut $2-3.
    Avid CPS Mounting Bracket > Category | Jenson USA Online Bike Shop

    Tools you need: Bench vice and sharp hacksaw/ or pipe cutter, file, punch or big flat screw driver, hammer. Most shops charge $30-40 to install a fork.

    Bikeman Kona P2 29er Disc Fork
    same fork, with canti mounts also is on sale for $30.

  13. #13
    Riding rigid
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    177
    [QUOTE=thad;9473212]You will also need a 185mm I.S. disc brake adapter, $11. Your current fork is post mount, most rigid's are I.S. mount. You will also need a star nut $2-3.
    Avid CPS Mounting Bracket > Category | Jenson USA Online Bike Shop

    Good catch Thad. Yeah, most rigid forks have IS tabs, so you will probably need to pick up a new adapter.

    I vote steel fork too.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    51
    Quote Originally Posted by 4nbstd View Post
    I haven't been on aluminum rigid fork before, but I've been on both steel and aluminum frames, and currently ride steel frame with rigid steel fork (2010 Kona Unit). Based on my experience with frame alone, I would go with steel fork.

    (I'm not even sure if they make aluminum rigid fork for 29er? I don't think I've seen one before).
    There are a few around, exotic makes the ones I've seen, but cannondale and bontrager and maybe kona have all made them at some point.

    eXotic 29er Rigid Alu MTB Bike Fork Disc V Mounts | eBay

    CarbonCycles.CC :: Components :: Products :: Forks - MTB Alloy, 1.1/8 in Steerer :: eXotic Rigid Alu MTB Fork - Disc Only :: CC-F0945

    Couple sites (or sellers) that have them listed. Maybe no more interesting than a carbon fork, though?

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 4nbstd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    607
    Quote Originally Posted by dosland View Post
    There are a few around, exotic makes the ones I've seen, but cannondale and bontrager and maybe kona have all made them at some point.

    eXotic 29er Rigid Alu MTB Bike Fork Disc V Mounts | eBay

    CarbonCycles.CC :: Components :: Products :: Forks - MTB Alloy, 1.1/8 in Steerer :: eXotic Rigid Alu MTB Fork - Disc Only :: CC-F0945

    Couple sites (or sellers) that have them listed. Maybe no more interesting than a carbon fork, though?
    I guess I haven't bothered to look for them.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •