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  1. #1
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    rider position? good climbing but no endo

    so I took in my rip 9 to local bike shop to be sized I have owned the bike for 6 months and just winged it when I build the bike as far as bar angle ,stem seat hight all that stuff. and went with a much lower bar. and longer stem , also higher seat. first 2 or 3 rides I felt not very balanced and too tall but after a month or so I really like the set up going up hill but going down hill I felt like I would go over the bars very easy. I was going down hill slower then normal. AND THEN BAM I endo over the bars hurt my wrist WTF . so wrist gets better and I am still going slower down hill but I like the set up other then felling too far forword on bike?? got a dropper seat post to try and move my body so I have more weight over the back of the bike going down hill. Is this just the way it is riding a well set up mountain bike or should I change my set up a little ?

  2. #2
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    The "longer stem" they added was likely a key component for screwing up the bike. You have to be careful of getting fit on a mountain bike, because most professional fitters (NOT ALL) use principles for fitting a road bike, which places you in position for optimal pedaling power and efficiency, but ignores bike handling, which is the more important of the two for typical trail riding. If you want to improve handling, especially on the downs, put a significantly shorter stem and depending on what you are running, wider bars. (Google "Wider bars and shorter stem" for good articles explaining why, like the one from Better Ride) How long is the stem they added that screwed up your handling?

  3. #3
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    I was having the same problem. A 60mm stem down from a 90mm sorted it for me. Stills climbs well. Try out a few cheap ones to see what you like.

  4. #4
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    Try changing technique before you toss money at new equipment. A shorter stem will not change your weight distribution as much as you can.

    For descending: Move your weight back - slide your butt back on the saddle; if the hill/drop/whatever is very steep slide your butt of the back of the saddle and over your rear tire.

    I do this all the time - with no dropper post. Although, a dropper would make it easier.

    With all that said - This seems obvious but. . . watch how much front brake you apply going down hills. You can use front brake, just be aware of your weight distribution, and how much brake you apply.

    For climbing: It is much more difficult to control your weight while standing on the pedals (equals hard to keep back tire planted with traction). If possible, keep your butt on the saddle. Move your arse forward on saddle - to the tip if necessary. If steep, bend forward feel like you are going to put you chest on the stem.

    I have a rip 9 rdo, great bike. It climbs like a goat and can descend faster than I am willing to push it.

  5. #5
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    thanks for all the great info! my stem was a 90mm 7deg down, and I went to a 100mm 8deg down. the width of the bars is 72.5 mm it is a niner bar ( straight ) and I did not cut. I think I may just go back with the 90mm7deg down and see how that feals?

    also when I go down the really steep stuff I do put my butt over the back tire, and seat post is all the way down. I went over the bars just 50 feet of trail after I put by butt over the seat, hit some sand from a newly formed water bar and over the bars I went.

  6. #6
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    Try flipping your stem to the up position or if you have spacers above your and below your stem, reposition them to give you a higher or lower bar height. Those are simple adjustments you can do on the trail (assuming you know how to do them). I just swapped a 10 mm spacer from above the stem to below it, and it improved how my bike felt. I still climb with my elbows dropped to keep weight over the front.

  7. #7
    Carbon & Ti rule
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    Hi
    Why don't you tell us how tall you are & what weight, Also what size is your bike & what seat height do you run ?

    Even a photo of the bike could help.

  8. #8
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    I am 5-8 200lbs with riding gear I have a niner rip 9 size med my inseam is 32 inches with riding shoes on.

    Seat height is 9 inches from frame to where saddle attaches to the seat post.
    also my elbows are not yet dropping on a level ground with my current set up.If I was to be climbing my elbows drop.

  9. #9
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    rider position? good climbing but no endo-niner-bike-002.jpg

  10. #10
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    Your slammed, down angled stem is aggressive - more like an XC set-up. I would flip the stem over and put a spacer under it.

    Also - just based on your picture - your saddle height seems a bit high. Looks like your are at BDC, your knee appears to be extended and your heal is high (as opposed to level). If your hips are stationary while pedaling it is probably ok. Just an observation from the photo.

    With all that - you can do far more weight control by actively moving your weight than you ever will with stem adjustments.

    And - sometimes we all crash. I have been mountain biking since 1991 or 92. I went over the bars yesterday and bruised my elbow and leg pretty good. If you don't want to get hurt, ride the couch - it is football season.

    I'm 5'8" with a 30.5" inseam and ride a small rip 9 rdo. Based on current bike fit preferences, many would say the bike is too small for me. But, I prefer a smaller more nimble bike.

  11. #11
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    thanks for the info! I think my seat height is good ,I think I have a bad pic.I think I will move a stem spacer under the stem and see what happens. thanks!

  12. #12
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    went on a short 5 mile ride before dark last night with 10 mm spacer mover to under the stem felt better on bike, and a little more confident going down hill. but felt like my butt was too far back on the saddle wile climbing ?? I will give it some more rides and see how it feels

  13. #13
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    Hard to tell from the photo because I can't see your saddle, but I agree with others in saying your bars are likely way too low. Try bar height even, or just a touch below, saddle height.

    I also agree that techniques for MTB & road bike fitting differ. But pedal position is pretty much uniersal. You need someone to check your knee over pedal spindle position - this will require a plumb and a second person. This position will determine the saddle fore/aft. Once this is done you need to fine tune your riding technique.
    Life....the original terminal illness

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by jasontech17 View Post
    went on a short 5 mile ride before dark last night with 10 mm spacer mover to under the stem felt better on bike, and a little more confident going down hill. but felt like my butt was too far back on the saddle wile climbing ?? I will give it some more rides and see how it feels
    I generally position my bars for going down, and just bend my elbows for going up. Do a google image search for "mountain bike attack position". Your bars should be high and back enough to allow this:
    http://cdn.mos.bikeradar.com/images/...ixz-670-70.jpg
    For going up, get on the nose of the saddle with your chin over the stem. Pull your elbows down and back as needed.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by car_nut View Post
    I generally position my bars for going down, and just bend my elbows for going up. Do a google image search for "mountain bike attack position". Your bars should be high and back enough to allow this:
    http://cdn.mos.bikeradar.com/images/...ixz-670-70.jpg
    For going up, get on the nose of the saddle with your chin over the stem. Pull your elbows down and back as needed.
    ummm... I think maybe it is the gold shorts j/k

    +1 on attack position and i've always used short stems(60mm below), though i suck at climbing.

  16. #16
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    Flip your stem next and give it a few rides. As pictured that's pretty aggressive XC and will not be forgiving if your body positing isn't correct on steep downs.

  17. #17
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    Mtb requires different positions in space to go fast downhill or for steep uphill climbing.
    You won't see 100 or 90mm stems on AM bike setups for the very reason you are posting. Guys like going fast and hitting jumps without flipping. They set their bikes up for that first and their priority for climbing is secondary. You don't get much climbing in when you are injured. Just logic.
    I could see a very experienced aggressive rider maybe inching toward your setup. But that guy would 100% be using a dropper post with it.
    I would flip up a 70mm stem and use a low riser bar like and Easton Haven carbon on that bike. And drop the seat at least an inch or use a dropper.

    Fabien Barel talks about his bar setup---
    Pro Bike Check: Fabien Barel's Canyon Strive AL 9.0 Race - Mountain Biking Pictures - Vital MTB

  18. #18
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    I do have a dropper post makes life down hill, for me much better and and faster.ks lev

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