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  1. #1
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    Rear 2.0 tire on 28 mm rim

    I currently have a Schwalbe Racing Ralph 2.25 Evolution at the rear, and a Nobby Nic 2.25 Evolution at the front.

    I like this combination, but unfortunately I have almost no clearance at the rear. The rear tire almost touches the right chainstay--while I have some clearance left at the left.

    I'm therefore looking for a thinner tire. I look for something allowing me to do some aggressive trail riding nevertheless, not slipping too much on wet rocks and roots. So XC race tires are not an option. I'd rather have an all-round tire.

    I'm thinking of Specialized The Captain 2.0 Control, but also Vredestein Black Panther Xtreme 2.2, which should have a real width of only 52 mm, and I've read an interesting review on twentynineinches.com.

    Last thing, I have an American Classic All Mountain rim (28 mm width externally). So I'd need a tire that fits well on this wider rim.

    Do you have any suggestions?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by solitone View Post
    I currently have a Schwalbe Racing Ralph 2.25 Evolution at the rear, and a Nobby Nic 2.25 Evolution at the front.

    I like this combination, but unfortunately I have almost no clearance at the rear. The rear tire almost touches the right chainstay--while I have some clearance left at the left.

    I'm therefore looking for a thinner tire. I look for something allowing me to do some aggressive trail riding nevertheless, not slipping too much on wet rocks and roots. So XC race tires are not an option. I'd rather have an all-round tire.

    I'm thinking of Specialized The Captain 2.0 Control, but also Vredestein Black Panther Xtreme 2.2, which should have a real width of only 52 mm, and I've read an interesting review on twentynineinches.com.

    Last thing, I have an American Classic All Mountain rim (28 mm width externally). So I'd need a tire that fits well on this wider rim.

    Do you have any suggestions?
    First, check the dish of the wheel. If your chainstays are even the tire should be centered.

    You can use any width tire you like on a 28mm rim.
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  3. #3
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    Is the dish of the wheel the rim?

    Anyway, the wheel is closer to the right chain stay than to the left.

    I contacted the frame manufacturer and they told me it's normal, as the right chainstay is constrained by the chainrings.

  4. #4
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    Captain 2.0 is one of my favorites on the rear.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by solitone View Post
    I currently have a Schwalbe Racing Ralph 2.25 Evolution at the rear, and a Nobby Nic 2.25 Evolution at the front.

    I like this combination, but unfortunately I have almost no clearance at the rear. The rear tire almost touches the right chainstay--while I have some clearance left at the left.

    I'm therefore looking for a thinner tire. I look for something allowing me to do some aggressive trail riding nevertheless, not slipping too much on wet rocks and roots. So XC race tires are not an option. I'd rather have an all-round tire.

    I'm thinking of Specialized The Captain 2.0 Control, but also Vredestein Black Panther Xtreme 2.2, which should have a real width of only 52 mm, and I've read an interesting review on twentynineinches.com.

    Last thing, I have an American Classic All Mountain rim (28 mm width externally). So I'd need a tire that fits well on this wider rim.

    Do you have any suggestions?
    If you like the tread, the Ralph comes in 2.1 Evolution as well in the 29"er version.

  6. #6
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    The only thing of The Captain I don't like is they're said to have thin sidewalls. Is this true?

    The current Racing Ralph I have are not Snake Skin (i.e. they don't have reinforced sidewalls), and I find it a bit too fragile for trail use.

    I've already experienced a serious cut on a rocky descent, and a second one last weekend that, though small, was disappointing, considering it occurred on a smooth trail of earth with some roots.

    For this reason I wouldn't choose Racing Ralph 2.1, as it only comes without Snake Skin (Racing Ralph 2.25 comes also with Snake Skin, but is too wide).

    How would The Captain compare as far as sidewalls are concerned?

  7. #7
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    Before even spending money on tires, I'd definitely "dish" the rim and see if it helps at all. When someone says "dish" , it means that they center the rim between your chainstays. The manufacturer may say its normal, but you don't have to live with it. If you hold up your rim youll see that its already dished to the drive side to accommodate for the cassette. It can be adjusted to the left or right fairly easily.

    I had the same problem on a used 29er I bought. I originally thought that the previous owner bent the drop outs or frame...but turns out that when he had his wheel trued...he only brought the wheel in. Normally this is ok, but some bikes require the rim to be "dished" either to the right or left so it sits centered. This is why it's important to bring in the bike as well.

    Cost me 30 bucks to have the rear wheel adjusted properly and any bike shop will know how to do this. Worth trying first, since it sounds like a wider tire better suits you.

  8. #8
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    This is good news, thanks for your clarification on dishing!

    Do you think it would be possible to dish the rim about a couple of millimeters to the left, or it'd be too much?

    I'll bring the bike to my LBS in the next days, hope it'll solve my issue!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by solitone View Post

    Do you think it would be possible to dish the rim about a couple of millimeters to the left, or it'd be too much?
    A couple of millimeters should not be an issue. When I had my shop fix mine, a 2.1 tire was rubbing the chainstay really bad. After it was dished, the rim was perfectly centered and was able to run a wider tire.

    I also recently bought a new wheelset and even from the factory it was off center a little bit, which is why I think certain bikes just need this done. I had even had my frame inspected and all was in spec. I think your local shop should have no problem dialing it in so you can continue to run your wider tires. If it gets off center again in the future, I'd assume it's the actual wheel...or possibly your riding style causes the wheels to go out of true sooner then normal.

  10. #10
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    Mine is a new wheelset by American Classic.

    American Classic recommends new wheels be inspected after a few hundred miles. I haven't done this yet, but I think they where off center (at least on my frame) from factory. I think the rear wheel was closer to the right chainstay from the very beginning.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by drz400sm View Post
    I also recently bought a new wheelset and even from the factory it was off center a little bit, which is why I think certain bikes just need this done.
    So it's not a problem if the rim is centered between the frame forks, and not between the fork nuts on the wheel?

    This would happen when the frame is not perfectly symmetrical.
    Last edited by solitone; 10-17-2012 at 06:55 AM.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by solitone View Post
    So it's not a problem if the rim is centered between the frame forks, and not between the fork nuts on the wheel?

    This would happen when the frame is not perfectly symmetrical.
    You know what, I'm not exactly sure what your asking....but the goal is to make sure the rim is centered between the chainstays when mounted and secured in the rear drop outs. I always thought that all frames were spec'd about the same in the rear so that they are compatible with majority of the wheelsets available, but after my situation I don't think it holds true to all frames. I'd imagine the tolerances vary from frame to frame, so even a 1-2 mm change would affect how the rim centers in the stays.

    Also, i should have suggested this earlier but make sure to check your rear skewer. Remove it from the wheel, disassemble it, and take a good look at it. a bent skewer would cause the same problems.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by drz400sm View Post
    You know what, I'm not exactly sure what your asking....but the goal is to make sure the rim is centered between the chainstays when mounted and secured in the rear drop outs. I always thought that all frames were spec'd about the same in the rear so that they are compatible with majority of the wheelsets available, but after my situation I don't think it holds true to all frames. I'd imagine the tolerances vary from frame to frame, so even a 1-2 mm change would affect how the rim centers in the stays.
    In theory, the front wheel, the frame, and the rear wheel should be on the same ideal plane.

    If the frame has no imperfections, the forks where the rear wheel is mounted on should be centered. This means that, when the rear wheel is correctly dished (i.e. the fork bolts on the wheel axle have the same distance from the rim), it would lay on the same plane of the front wheel and the frame.

    From what I've read, it may happen that chainstays and seatstays are not perfectly even, even though forks are centered as I put it above.

    This implies the rear rim may well be not equidistant from the stays, although it is equidistant from the forks.

    So if you dish the wheel so that it becomes equidistant from the stays, it might happen that it is not equidistant from the forks anymore and, as a consequence, it does not lay on the frame plane.

    The point here is that it seems it's very likely that the frame forks are even, while it's unlikely that the stays are even. So usually it'd be enough to dish the wheel just referring to the fork bolts, and not also to the frame.

    The only situation where you should refer to the frame is when the forks are not even, but this shouldn't happen for a well made frame.

    I don't have experience on this topic, so I might well be wrong. These are only ideas I collected reading on the Internet!

    Anyhow, I realize I'm drifting away from the original topic. so I have opened a specific thread here:
    About dishing wheels

    I'll defenitely take my bike to a LBS as soon as I have time next week. This is only curiosity to better understand the issue.

  14. #14
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    Can you find a Captain? I've been pleasantly surprised with a X-King Protection on the rear.

  15. #15
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    I eventually broght my wheel and frame to a good mechanic, and he dished the wheel to the frame (i.e. not to the hub).

    This moved the wheel a couple of millimiters to the left, and now it has the same distance from both chainstays.

    As a consequence, the wheel is slightly closer to the left seatstay now, but it's a negligible difference. Plus, I have more room near the seatstays, so it's not an issue.

    True, I didn't gained a huge amount of chainstay clearance, but now it's much better. It costed me 20 euro, and I can still ride my Racing Ralph 2.25 on the rear

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