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  1. #1
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    problems with air pressure staying in wheels

    just purchased easton haven carbons with continental race kings 2.2 wheels. the tires have a slow leak. ie i did the front tire friday and it's close to flat. rear was done saturday and there's noticeable difference between when i filled the tire up to this morning. i hadn't seen any leaks around the wheel and tire. is there anything else i should be looking out for for some reason?

  2. #2
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    Valve core ?

  3. #3
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    Check your valves, and also the tires themselves. You may need to snug the valves a teeny bit, and also keep shakin the wheels. What Race Kings are you using? (protection, race sport etc) Try airing them back up and putting them in the tub or spraying soapy water on them (the valves, sidewalls) to check for bubbles (leaks)
    Stay aware of those who hide in plain sight.

  4. #4
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    Bikeabuser has a good point too. Do your valves have removable cores? Give a slight snug there too, if so.
    Stay aware of those who hide in plain sight.

  5. #5
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    I've found 4 ounces of Stans sealant is the minimum required for new tires. Refreshing a couple months later with 2 ounces. Drier climates may need more. Some thicker walled tires may need less. Often it takes a shorter ride for the sealant to soak in everywhere to hold air well.

  6. #6
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    okay so the one the valve appeared to be loose. so i hand tighten it as best as i can. should i just leave it at that?
    as for the other guy? i'll be airing it up again throwing it in the tub to see what happens. just a head scratcher to me.
    EDIT; saw more posts here. i put in two scoops since they were new tires as per everything i've ever been read/told.

  7. #7
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    Nothing to scratch head about, just need to cover all of your bases with running tubeless. There are only three places air can get out, (valves, nipples, tires) and being that your rims are UST, that only leaves two (valves, tires) The sidewall variety of your tires makes a difference, hence why I asked what version of the RaceKings you are running.

    Finger tight is good with the valves. A trick is to push down on the valve from the inside of the rim while snugging the valve nut. No need to take tire off, just press through flattened tire. You don't want to tighten it with a wrench or anything like that. How did you put the sealant in? Into the tire and then finished seating it, or through the valve, by way of a removable valve core? Make sure the valve core is snugged too if you put the sealant in that way.

    Shake the wheels, spin the wheels, bounce the wheels. You want to make sure that the sealant gets all over the inside of the tires, and also around the valve.
    Stay aware of those who hide in plain sight.

  8. #8
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    i put the wheel on inflated for proper fit. took wheel off about a quarter of the way, added sealant, reapply tire. filled tire to about 20psi and then shook it like hell for a good twenty mins while rotating it.
    i guess i should add i kept doing and then adding soapy water on each side until i looked like i saw no more bubbles.

  9. #9
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    Add more pressure. Not necessarily sealant. Air your tires up to around 35 PSI. The way I shake the tire is I grab the wheel at 3 and 9 and sort of swing the 6 oclock part to and from...this splashes the sealant on the sidewalls. Reposition about every spokes distance and continue until you have done a revolution with the wheel.

    The bounce thing that I do is basically dropping the wheel from about 2 inches high and catching it on the bounce. Give a slight flick to create a small bit of rotation while doing this...about a spoke or two's span of rotation each bounce. This also splashes the sealant around the inside of the entire cavity. For you this is most important at the valve location, but give the wheel a full revolution or two doing this too.

    Just spinning the wheel makes the sealant go to tread area due to centripetal force. Spinning on its side only gets to part of the sidewall. Gotta get the sealant to splash.

    As your doing what I described above the sound of sloshing sealant will get less and less audible because it is being somewhat dispersed around the tire.

    I've always had easy times airing up with what I have described. Stay with it, you'll have it down in no time.

    Remember it isn't about just shaking the tire like "hell", it is about shaking the tire with purpose. Be precise.
    Stay aware of those who hide in plain sight.

  10. #10
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    Have you tried riding them around the neighborhood? Someone in another thread said that sometimes that is needed to seal up the beads. I found it worked for me.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slash5 View Post
    Have you tried riding them around the neighborhood? Someone in another thread said that sometimes that is needed to seal up the beads. I found it worked for me.
    just did that. i'll check the air pressure just before i wander off for the day to ensure that it's all boo. maybe i'm just being paranoid now since i'm not use to riding on that low of pressure now. it just felt.........odd

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by jochribs View Post
    Add more pressure. Not necessarily sealant. Air your tires up to around 35 PSI. The way I shake the tire is I grab the wheel at 3 and 9 and sort of swing the 6 oclock part to and from...this splashes the sealant on the sidewalls. Reposition about every spokes distance and continue until you have done a revolution with the wheel.

    Just spinning the wheel makes the sealant go to tread area due to centripetal force. Spinning on its side only gets to part of the sidewall. Gotta get the sealant to splash.

    As your doing what I described above the sound of sloshing sealant will get less and less audible because it is being somewhat dispersed around the tire.

    I've always had easy times airing up with what I have described. Stay with it, you'll have it down in no time.

    Remember it isn't about just shaking the tire like "hell", it is about shaking the tire with purpose. Be precise.
    I always air up to 35PSI then go for an EASY ride around the neighborhood to get the beads to seat real well and splash the sealant around. Other than that, the valves can be sneaky. Tubeless is a very simple setup that almost becomes an art form! My first tubeless conversion was a NIGHTMARE! Now I can fix/change a tire on the trail with a hand pump Gets much easier and brainless with time...

  13. #13
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    I lubed the rim with Stans, pumped tire to 55 PSI and made sure it seated 100%, shook it, laid it on one side then shook again laid it on other side, did that 4 times, set it on an pale so it sits flat. Left it for a day, deflated it to running pressure and haven't had one issue. It was my first one too, I am 220lbs and it has not burped once in any riding I do on rocks or roots, pretty happy with the setup. Stans rims and Maxxis cross mark tires. I used Stans tape, tried the gorilla tape method and it works but it doesnt hold air as well as the Stans tape way.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by fahza29er View Post
    I lubed the rim with Stans, pumped tire to 55 PSI and made sure it seated 100%, shook it, laid it on one side then shook again laid it on other side, did that 4 times, set it on an pale so it sits flat. Left it for a day, deflated it to running pressure and haven't had one issue. It was my first one too, I am 220lbs and it has not burped once in any riding I do on rocks or roots, pretty happy with the setup. Stans rims and Maxxis cross mark tires. I used Stans tape, tried the gorilla tape method and it works but it doesnt hold air as well as the Stans tape way.
    When reading the above advice (regardless if it works for him or not), keep in mind NoTubes recommends that you never should exceed 40 psi for a tubeless mountain bike tire.

    Note: Do not exceed 40 psi when seating a mountain bike tire tubeless on Stanís rims. Do not exceed 55 psi when seating a cyclocross tire tubeless on Stanís rims. - Tire Inflating Tips

    The tire will seat just fine and seal up at a psi below 40. No reason to take the risk and go above that.

    BB

  15. #15
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    okay so i've got the front going no problem at all.
    however my rear is still causing issues. upon closer inspection, i see that there is a hole maybe a bit bigger than the size of a pin head on the wheel itself. i noticed that the front has what appears to be the exact same thing. when i shake around the stans no tube liquid, i can actually see it splashing out of the hole. is this part of the manufacturing for a carbon wheel? like i said, why would i have issues with one wheel and not the other if it looks like both have the same thing? just odd.

  16. #16
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    Yeah, that does sound odd. Being that this is a UST rim there should be no penetrations through the rim, save for the valve. Either the Stans has made it past the valve connection or there is something wrong I would presume.

    I am leaning towards the valve not being sealed properly.

    Anyway you can get your post count up to 10 and take a load up a picture?
    Stay aware of those who hide in plain sight.

  17. #17
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    yeah i suppose i can get up to that soon hopefully. if you looked on line and seen pics of this wheel, it's litterally in the middle of the a on the lettering.

  18. #18
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    I'll take a look. Before looking, I'm going to bet it's just a drain hole to let water out of the rim. The sealant must be getting past the valve.
    Stay aware of those who hide in plain sight.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by jochribs View Post
    I'll take a look. Before looking, I'm going to bet it's just a drain hole to let water out of the rim. The sealant must be getting past the valve.
    For the OP, I usually like to dip the rubber end of my valve in sealant, and then install the valve on the rim nice and snug (and I mean - really snug) before mounting the tires. Helps build up a nice seal around that rubber/rim interface.

    You mentioned "shaking the tire" a lot. But did you lay each wheel sideways/flat on a bucket for 5-10 minutes each side, shake and bake and flip the wheel pancake to the other side a couple of times to really seal up the sidewalls of the Race Kings? Some tires take a few days to really seal up before they are golden, but skipping this step of shake and bake, lay flat, flip, repeat as needed - in spite of it being labor intensive - really takes care of most problems of tricky tires to run tubeless. Most "tricky" tires are the lighter XC ones and I rould rank the Race Kings in there (along with the non snake skin Ralphs).

    2 ounces in each tire should be plenty.

    Watch this video and, in your case, pay special attention to the soaping, shaking and laying it flat on the top of a bucket for sidewall and bead/interface sealing.


  20. #20
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    ^Good advice with the valve Bruce.
    Stay aware of those who hide in plain sight.

  21. #21
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    yes i've been doing all that's been explained. heck i went back to that video just to make sure i was doing everything right when i first noticed this problem.

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