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  1. #1
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    Industry Nine rim swap

    I have an Industry Nine wheelset with Stan's Arch rims, and I'd like to swap them for some carbon rims.
    Did someone go the same route?
    I would like wide and strong rims, but I can only find some 30mm wide rims with a 603mm ERD (Arch's is 604).
    What do you think is the smallest ERD I can use my I9 spokes with? I'm considering the use of washers, to go down to 598mm at least. Do you think it would work? May I go lower, with washers? Which washers would you use?

    Thanks for your opinions.

  2. #2
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I think you're asking for trouble.

    Does I9 have special spokes or something? They're not really that expensive a part...
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  3. #3
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    R: Industry Nine rim swap

    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    Does I9 have special spokes or something?
    It does.
    Spokes are aluminium made and threaded into the hubs. They're very expensive, and they only comes as a replacement for the complete wheels, so changing spokes length is not an option.

    I checked and I think that going down to 598 erd should be doable, using washers. Not less then that, for sure.

  4. #4
    AZ
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    Sell the I9's and buy some 240's.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZ View Post
    Sell the I9's and...
    I would.
    They've been on classifieds (not mtbr's, I'm in Europe) for some months but didn't go.
    They've singlespeed rear hub and lefty front, so I guess they're not easy to sell.

    Plus I love the quick engagement and they've a killer look.
    I think I'll upgrade them to carbon rims.

  6. #6
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    With enough tinkering, all things are possible. My concern would be having stuff sticking up above the rim bed. Whether you're doing tubed or not, that's going to be an issue.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    With enough tinkering, all things are possible. My concern would be having stuff sticking up above the rim bed. Whether you're doing tubed or not, that's going to be an issue.
    Rim bed will remain where it is now with Stan's rim.
    They're both 622 BSD rims, and their channel is similar.
    No issue of stuff sticking up above the rim bed, it will all remain below as it is now.

  8. #8
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    603 vs 004 erd is hardly enough of a difference to justify 'shorter' spokes, I have i9's and the spokes would just thread into the hub a little more to compensate for the length difference, buy the new rims and use your old spokes, easy

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by alias33 View Post
    603 vs 004 erd is hardly enough of a difference to justify 'shorter' spokes, I have i9's and the spokes would just thread into the hub a little more to compensate for the length difference, buy the new rims and use your old spokes, easy
    Yes, the 603mm erd rims are the safe option.
    The preferred one is instead 598mm erd rims, 'cause they are wider too, and I'm sold on wide rims.

  10. #10
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    With the way the spokes thread into the hub you can go much smaller ERD. The spokes just poke out the other side of the threaded hole in the hub. No need for washers.

  11. #11
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    How much of the spoke is threaded? Seems like one might run out that way.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    How much of the spoke is threaded? Seems like one might run out that way.
    If I remember right ( to lazy to go to garage to check lol) the threads are larger than the spoke dia. so they would go into the hub until they came out the other end.
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  13. #13
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    LOL, so you give yourself the opportunity not to have enough thread engagement. Great...
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    LOL, so you give yourself the opportunity not to have enough thread engagement. Great...
    Spokes have more then 10mm of thread.
    I think that 5-6 mm of engaged thread would be enough

  15. #15
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    In seriousness, it depends on their diameter and thread pitch. Only about three threads usually take load, but the first and last couple are often a little lower or otherwise weird, and aluminum's a pretty soft metal.

    If someone dropped this project in my lap, I'd definitely be looking at spacers to land as much of the thread in my hub as possible. Our standard at my job is at least 1.5 diameters, but we also avoid stainless steel fasteners to avoid galling; that's harder than aluminum, at least. Are the hubs aluminum too? You'll want to use some kind of thread prep if they are.

    Do the spokes contact each other where they cross?
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    If someone dropped this project in my lap, I'd definitely be looking at spacers to land as much of the thread in my hub as possible.
    Agree.
    I'll space them out as much as possible with washers.
    I can't exceed in doing that because that will bury the wrench engagement into the rim, but a couple of mm here and a couple at the thread will be enough!

    Our standard at my job is at least 1.5 diameters, but we also avoid stainless steel fasteners to avoid galling; that's harder than aluminum, at least. Are the hubs aluminum too? You'll want to use some kind of thread prep if they are.

    Do the spokes contact each other where they cross?
    Hub and spokes are both made of aluminium.
    I'll use some grease or antiseize for the thread.
    Thread diameter is 4mm so yes, I think 6mm will be enough. If I can let more in I will. Spokes do not contact each other where they cross.

  17. #17
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    Well, can't say I'd have these components to work with in the first place. But it sounds like you're approaching it in a way that should work. Good luck!
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbmxer View Post
    With the way the spokes thread into the hub you can go much smaller ERD. The spokes just poke out the other side of the threaded hole in the hub. No need for washers.
    I have built a wheel this way. Probably 5 or more mm sticking out past the threaded hub holes. The wheel has been problem free for 6 months.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by savo View Post
    Agree.
    I'll space them out as much as possible with washers.
    I can't exceed in doing that because that will bury the wrench engagement into the rim, but a couple of mm here and a couple at the thread will be enough!


    Hub and spokes are both made of aluminium.
    I'll use some grease or antiseize for the thread.
    Thread diameter is 4mm so yes, I think 6mm will be enough. If I can let more in I will. Spokes do not contact each other where they cross.
    Do not use grease or anything else on spoke threads!! only boiled linseed oil. Can't stress that enough. You can get it from i-9 in a smaller container.
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by ric-the-mountainbike View Post
    Do not use grease or anything else on spoke threads!! only boiled linseed oil. Can't stress that enough. You can get it from i-9 in a smaller container.
    What about using spoke prep. Good or not?
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  21. #21
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    I wouldn't recommend any other spoke prep. In my experience, preps that really harden create a very anaerobic hold. The spoke/hub interface has such a large surface area that the harder preps work too well, making it very difficult/impossible to turn the spokes once the prep has set up.
    Boiled linseed oil has a much better consistency for the build up process. It does a better job lubricating initially. Once it's dried, it has very good holding strength whilst allowing you to service the wheel down the road. It is kind of like sap. It will generally hold up pretty well for several truings. Only when a wheel is completely disassembled would you really need to re-dip the spokes in linseed.
    Here's a pack of matches, go play in the street

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by ric-the-mountainbike View Post
    Do not use grease or anything else on spoke threads!! only boiled linseed oil. Can't stress that enough. You can get it from i-9 in a smaller container.

    myth

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