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  1. #1
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    Help, Went over the bars hard today!!!

    Does anyone use any grippy compound like tar?

    It was a extra muggy out and my hands slipped off the bars and I went tumbling downhill at my home traill I ride 3 times a week.

    How do I fix this?

    New Gloves? sugesstions?
    New Grips? rocking oury lock on's right now about a year old...
    Raise the bars Up?
    Sticky compound?

    Help!

  2. #2
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    Better gloves, I have been soaked in rain and sweat and never lost my grip on my bars.
    I have race face lock on grips and they are very tacky, so far so good.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by fahza29er View Post
    Better gloves, I have been soaked in rain and sweat and never lost my grip on my bars.
    I have race face lock on grips and they are very tacky, so far so good.
    What gloves do you use? Race face ones as well?

  4. #4
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    Yes I have a set of race face full finger gloves for trials and the fall and a pair of specialized half finger gloves for summer XC riding.

  5. #5
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    I use batting gloves. I have never slipped off the grips, though I had a bad fall (taco'd wheel) in May when I went over the handlebars (in no way related to loss of grip). If they grip a bat well, surely they'll have no problem with handlebars.

  6. #6
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    Help, Went over the bars hard today!!!

    Football lineman gloves. Meant for creating friction when two 300lb behemoths try to move each other. You can find them without the padding on the back of the hand.

    I like the Oury Lock-Ons for a tacky fat grip, the TLD ODI lock-ons for tacky thin grip.

  7. #7
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    I turned the degree of the bars so I get more leverage.

    I am going to try resin that bowlers use for extra grip, and see how that goes...

    After finishing a bleed I got rubbing alcohol on the ourys and it seemed to make them more grippy... I did this a few minutes ago and got the same effect. Idk how long it will last but has anyone had an experience like this?

  8. #8
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    This sounds like a dumb question, but how are your hands slipping off, if your thumbs are behind the bars?

    I literally can't picture how this is happening.
    Death from Below.

  9. #9
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    You can give ESI Racers Edge or the Chunky style grips out. I use them in the California heat with no gloves and sweaty palms. Never had a hand slip.

    MTB Grips

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    This sounds like a dumb question, but how are your hands slipping off, if your thumbs are behind the bars?

    I literally can't picture how this is happening.
    It was.
    Part of this problem was a mental lapse I was not holding tight enough.
    I started to go down a straight downhill section. so I made the transition from sitting to standing and released some of the pressure on my thumb and it just went flying off. hopeuflly that clarifies the scenario

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    This sounds like a dumb question, but how are your hands slipping off, if your thumbs are behind the bars?

    I literally can't picture how this is happening.
    I'm with Duke, here... What REALLY HAPPENED???
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  12. #12
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    Last edited by NslrPrtn; 08-11-2013 at 02:50 PM.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by toot334455 View Post
    I turned the degree of the bars so I get more leverage.

    I am going to try resin that bowlers use for extra grip, and see how that goes...

    After finishing a bleed I got rubbing alcohol on the ourys and it seemed to make them more grippy... I did this a few minutes ago and got the same effect. Idk how long it will last but has anyone had an experience like this?
    I hate to say this but you're looking for a fix/bandaid to what you perceive as a mechanical problem, when it's a technique issue.

    You have great grips, no need to screw around trying to add some sticky crap. Maybe better gloves. I've fallen in a creek crossing we have, gloves soaked, grips soaked and still never had my hand 'just slip off'

    Even after your description, I can't picture how it happened.
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  14. #14
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    Help, Went over the bars hard today!!!

    I cant picture this happening due to grip either. Is it possible that you had your arms locked and something slowed your front wheel?
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  15. #15
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    Apply the tar to your butt and the saddle, then sit. Problem solved.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  16. #16
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    I don't believe the answer is grippier grips or nicer gloves. I would say any $10 mtb grips and $10 mtb gloves are more than adequate. I believe the real answer is technique, maybe body positioning. I believe that you should try to simply stay centered on your bike and to not have the saddle so high up that you don't have room to bend your knees a little (and also get your weight lower). The more you move your body's center of gravity out of the "center point" between the axles, the more the axles are able to "buck you" (throw you off) and the more you may need to tighten your grip in order to "hang on". If properly centered, you can ride with minimal weight on the bars, with a light grip.
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  17. #17
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    Once again let me add more detail...

    I was shooting for a personal best at my local trail I ride 2-3 times a week.
    Entering a downhill section, I was thinking about my technique breathing and the sections coming up ahead so I can make a clean run through them.
    In this downhill section, it is full of unavoidable bumps in succession so its best to ride straight through them.
    As This thought process was going on in my head I realized I needed to stand up (I ride a hard tail and weigh 220 lbs). I did not want to bend the rails on another saddle.
    As I stood up, I twisted the grip of my hands on the grips and at that moment I ether hit a bump, fell off a bump( in both cases my grip slipped) or I purely was focused on other things and a complete lack of focus and just not gripping hard enough caused my spill.

    After bending both, the brake levers on my hope m4's and ripping the string on my shorts, taking them off and riding in spandex for the first time(which was a beuatiful thing) some positive does come out of this. While scraping the whole right side of my body and ruining my best timing on the trail ever(using strava). And being my "home trail", where I ride 2-3 a week and have over 100 rides in.....
    Mentally I was unable to rationalize it as user error.....
    one Side note is that I over inflated my front tire to 38 psi instead of 34, maybe this feeling difference threw me off.

    After the spill, I kept gripping the bars so hard and it seemed as if the harder I gripped the less traction I actually got on them...

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by toot334455 View Post
    Once again let me add more detail...

    I was shooting for a personal best at my local trail I ride 2-3 times a week.
    Entering a downhill section, I was thinking about my technique breathing and the sections coming up ahead so I can make a clean run through them.
    In this downhill section, it is full of unavoidable bumps in succession so its best to ride straight through them.
    As This thought process was going on in my head I realized I needed to stand up (I ride a hard tail and weigh 220 lbs). I did not want to bend the rails on another saddle.
    As I stood up, I twisted the grip of my hands on the grips and at that moment I ether hit a bump, fell off a bump( in both cases my grip slipped) or I purely was focused on other things and a complete lack of focus and just not gripping hard enough caused my spill.

    After bending both, the brake levers on my hope m4's and ripping the string on my shorts, taking them off and riding in spandex for the first time(which was a beuatiful thing) some positive does come out of this. While scraping the whole right side of my body and ruining my best timing on the trail ever(using strava). And being my "home trail", where I ride 2-3 a week and have over 100 rides in.....
    Mentally I was unable to rationalize it as user error.....
    one Side note is that I over inflated my front tire to 38 psi instead of 34, maybe this feeling difference threw me off.

    After the spill, I kept gripping the bars so hard and it seemed as if the harder I gripped the less traction I actually got on them...
    After reading this latest post, and its details, I think that Two Tones and Varaxis's posts are closest to being the most pertinent to your question.

    In other words, grips and gloves are most likely minor factors contributing to your crash, here, at best. The question you have to answer for yourself is, "was today really a good time for me to shoot for a personal best on this segment?"
    That may seem like a Captain Obvious type statement, but really, I believe that is at the heart of your question, not the bike, the tires, the grips, gloves, etc....you gotta really think about why you "went for it" today. Regardless of the "why" you come up with, remember that the REALITY of what resulted is undisputable....you ate-shit .

    I'm assuming you did not suffer a serious injury, or hit your head, or anything like that, so there is certainly a lot to be grateful for in the aftermath. This amounts to a learning experience opportunity for you: think long and hard about it, and what it may be trying to reveal to you. Don't blow chances like this ---trust me here. This seemingly unfortunate event is really a potential goldmine of personal insight for you. So before you run out and start replacing every piece of equipment you have, or even considering getting a new bike, treat this crash as a lesson, the objectives of which only you can discover.

    Why am I sounding this way? Well, it's not because I have a need to sound pedantic or anything like that: I don't. But I HAVE been in the very same spot you are in before, many many times. I'm no Spring Chicken, so by now, I've learned when a "setback" is really a chance, however tenuous, to see myself from a different perspective, and to learn.

    If only i knew back then, what I know now!

    Oh...one more thing. Keep in mind that my advice, like the advice of everybody else who posts on your thread, is basically worth every cent you are paying for it!

  19. #19
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    damn, that resonated so deep...
    who are you and what where you in a past life?

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Raton View Post
    After reading this latest post, and its details, I think that Two Tones and Varaxis's posts are closest to being the most pertinent to your question.

    In other words, grips and gloves are most likely minor factors contributing to your crash, here, at best. The question you have to answer for yourself is, "was today really a good time for me to shoot for a personal best on this segment?"
    That may seem like a Captain Obvious type statement, but really, I believe that is at the heart of your question, not the bike, the tires, the grips, gloves, etc....you gotta really think about why you "went for it" today. Regardless of the "why" you come up with, remember that the REALITY of what resulted is undisputable....you ate-shit .

    I'm assuming you did not suffer a serious injury, or hit your head, or anything like that, so there is certainly a lot to be grateful for in the aftermath. This amounts to a learning experience opportunity for you: think long and hard about it, and what it may be trying to reveal to you. Don't blow chances like this ---trust me here. This seemingly unfortunate event is really a potential goldmine of personal insight for you. So before you run out and start replacing every piece of equipment you have, or even considering getting a new bike, treat this crash as a lesson, the objectives of which only you can discover.

    Why am I sounding this way? Well, it's not because I have a need to sound pedantic or anything like that: I don't. But I HAVE been in the very same spot you are in before, many many times. I'm no Spring Chicken, so by now, I've learned when a "setback" is really a chance, however tenuous, to see myself from a different perspective, and to learn.

    If only i knew back then, what I know now!

    Oh...one more thing. Keep in mind that my advice, like the advice of everybody else who posts on your thread, is basically worth every cent you are paying for it!
    WOW! Damn, you killed that man. I just read ^this 3 times over. Powerful and insightful on SO many different levels. Good stuff and very well said.

  21. #21
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    There was this one little rock I endoed on and thought of a year later just before I did it again, I think I'm too fast for it now.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by For Waukee View Post
    WOW! Damn, you killed that man. I just read ^this 3 times over. Powerful and insightful on SO many different levels. Good stuff and very well said.
    3 times? I couldn't even read it through once and my head hurt. Going OTB is inevitable sometimes unless your too timid and ride like a 4 yr old girl. Don't read into it too much and stay fluid on the bike, a deathgrip will subconsciously cause your whole body to stiffen up which will cause mishaps.

  23. #23
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    Chalk it up to $h1t happens and roll on.

  24. #24
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    Great responses on this thread, especially Ray Raton. Not an equipment issue. I'm sure you could go back tomorrow with wet hands and electrical tape wrapped on the bars and get your best time now that your "lizard brain" will remember the shitfest that happens when you lose grip on the bars.
    I think the main thing is getting a bit too comfortable with a local trail we're used to being able to ride at the limit without much thought. We're not roadies where we could see a new pothole from a hundred yards away and easily avoid it. New rain ruts, rocks, branches, giant piles of deer poop, whatever, are changed every day. Just last year I was on lap 2 of my favorite trail, after a long day of work, and feeling pretty awesome and confident going full speed to the bottom of a hill. Oops, new rain ruts, slam, bloodied up my whole left side. My brain no longer lets itself think of spreadsheets and presentations when going down that hill.

  25. #25
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    You loosened your grip in the transition from sitting to standing. Hit a sharp bump and knocked your hand off. Been there done that. The only advice I have is . "Don't do that again!"
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  26. #26
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    I always crash over the bars. Difficult to hang on with a beer in one hand and a cig in the other. Skip the fancy grips and get a dropper.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by 7daysaweek View Post
    Chalk it up to $h1t happens and roll on.
    That's what I was thinking...

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  28. #28
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    I have a hard time imagining my hands slipping off the bars. In over 20 years of mountain biking that may be they only way I HAVEN'T crashed. However, a few months ago I was at the top of a switchback coming down and I was watching a guy at the bottom climbing up out of the saddle. All of a sudden he slammed into his handlebar and fell over. When I got to the bottom he was still laying on the trail moaning. I asked if he was OK and what happened. He said his hands slipped off the bars and he slammed his sternum into the steerer tube. I saw it happen and still can't believe it.

    My only thought is maybe you had your hands too close to the bar ends? I used to find myself pushing my hands out past the bar end until I got a wider bar and grips with a larger outer lock ring that lets me know when I'm at the end.

  29. #29
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    First off let me say "Eesh".
    You were going for a PR, you got in over your head, and you ate shit. Is it really that difficult to figure out?
    No need to get all existential, meditate on your belly-button, or start blaming the equipment.
    If you think buying something is going to help, get some decent elbow/knee protection and move the #@!k on.

    If I don't eat shit at least once it probably wasn't a great ride anyway.
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  30. #30
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    I just went over a cliff on the fat bike and stayed on through 1 somersault before
    getting launched.

    Don't think it had anything to do with my grips....
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  31. #31
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    Yeah, technique is where it's at. I wouldn't blow thousands of dollars for 5% more grip when the real issue is you need to watch the trail more. I mean, whatcha gonna do? Duct Tape your hands down?

  32. #32
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    It's happened to me before. I analysed the event and came up with the simple fact that I struck a small dip/rock/whatever in the trail and my wrist just happened to be bent forward above a straight line between the elbow and the grip. My weight shifting forward at the dip just rolled my hand over the bar. ESI chunky grips and full finger gloves.

    Just picture doing a push up on a bar and having your wrists bent forward. Not going to work right, is it?
    I see hills.

    I want to climb them.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stevob View Post
    It's happened to me before. I analysed the event and came up with the simple fact that I struck a small dip/rock/whatever in the trail and my wrist just happened to be bent forward above a straight line between the elbow and the grip. My weight shifting forward at the dip just rolled my hand over the bar. ESI chunky grips and full finger gloves.

    Just picture doing a push up on a bar and having your wrists bent forward. Not going to work right, is it?
    this is the best description of what happened.

    I think we all can learn something from both view points of "It ****ing happens move on" and "meditation with a clear mind".

    I decided that I need a little brake from "being so serious", so I took my buddy who doesn't ride at all to this very same trail...
    While going at a slower cadenece you would never believe how much detail in the trail and surroundings I miss when riding as fast as I can.
    As we get faster and faster we forget what the trail looked like when we first started riding.

    I would compare this feeling to coming home from a long vacation and jumping in your own bed for the first time in weeks...

    I think we all need this ^^^^ once in a while to see whats really happening in our ride just as much as we need to wipe out, eat shit, learn from it and move on...

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by toot334455 View Post
    this is the best description of what happened.

    I think we all can learn something from both view points of "It ****ing happens move on" and "meditation with a clear mind".

    I decided that I need a little brake from "being so serious", so I took my buddy who doesn't ride at all to this very same trail...
    While going at a slower cadenece you would never believe how much detail in the trail and surroundings I miss when riding as fast as I can.
    As we get faster and faster we forget what the trail looked like when we first started riding.

    I would compare this feeling to coming home from a long vacation and jumping in your own bed for the first time in weeks...

    I think we all need this ^^^^ once in a while to see whats really happening in our ride just as much as we need to wipe out, eat shit, learn from it and move on...
    I think the lesson is less deep than you think it is.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by toot334455 View Post
    this is the best description of what happened.

    I think we all can learn something from both view points of "It ****ing happens move on" and "meditation with a clear mind".

    I decided that I need a little brake from "being so serious", so I took my buddy who doesn't ride at all to this very same trail...
    While going at a slower cadenece you would never believe how much detail in the trail and surroundings I miss when riding as fast as I can.
    As we get faster and faster we forget what the trail looked like when we first started riding.

    I would compare this feeling to coming home from a long vacation and jumping in your own bed for the first time in weeks...

    I think we all need this ^^^^ once in a while to see whats really happening in our ride just as much as we need to wipe out, eat shit, learn from it and move on...
    ^^^ Slowing down a bit can be a huge help in figuring out what went wrong, unless going too slow turns out to be the cause of the crash, in the first place.

    Case in point: my well-appreciated ability at mastering the "uphill OTB". Highly amusing to my friends, and even to strangers, I perform this trick periodically as a result of climbing a hill, crawling it, really, way too slow, and when my fork encounters an otherwise perfectly good embedded rock, it exhibits the excellent shock absorbing and damping characteristics that I paid very good $$$ for, and absorbs the bump completely. Due to my extremely slow speed, of course, this stops the bike in its' tracks, and since I'm usually standing up, leaning forward, I exit the bike head first, right over the bars. So far, no serious injuries have resulted from that little stunt. Last time I remember doing it was climbing Mt. Elden in Flagstaff, right in front a singlespeed lady who was patiently waiting for a chance to pass my slow, sea-level lunged ass.

    These days, though, I really do enjoy descents taken at say, 75% of the fastest speed I could do them. As you mentioned, you really do see a lot more stuff when you slow down a bit on the downhills, and for me that's a pretty good incentive avoid any more ER visits, right there.

  36. #36
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    If you have decent gloves and decent grips ok, it is not the equipment.
    Bowler's resin is not the answer.

    Technique is the deal. Loose grip is advantageous at times. Use legs and arms as suspension, keeping hands relaxed for proper braking and control. Death grip is not needed or desired.

    Ride safe and continue to enjoy yourself.
    Good post.

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