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  1. #1
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    Heavy duty Wheels?

    hello everyone, total noob here.
    So I am a Big guy 6'7" 320lbs. been riding my Trek Marlin 29er for about 4 months now and I am starting to have problems with my back wheel. Had to have 3 spokes replaced in the past month and today when I was out riding I managed to bend my stock rear wheel. So I am looking to upgrade the rear wheel. What wheels should I be looking at and what should I look for in a wheel. Plan on upgrading to a full suspension bike around February next year so it would be nice to be able to switch it over to the new bike also. Thanks in advance for any help.

  2. #2
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    Reputation: razardica's Avatar
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    Get some wheels built up - Stan's Flow EX rims on Hope hubs - you can change the endcaps on Hopes easily to adapt to other bikes and Flows will handle your weight no problem - get em built up with some nice, solid spokes. 36 hole wheels would be great too.

  3. #3
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    A riding buddy of mine who is around 310 had similar issues, but he was using Flows laced to chris kings. He was lucky to have the wheels last two rides without needing MAJOR truing, and was constantly replacing spokes and re-dishing.

    After spending a lot of time and money trying to keep his wheels in decent shape he actually decided to sell his Niner Jet 9 and bought a RM slayer that he got an incredible deal on.

    I was happy to hear from him a few weeks ago and apparently the smaller, stronger wheels are working well.

    So, definitely do not skimp on wheels for a guy of your size.

  4. #4
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    I would recommend hadley hubs over the hopes, I recommended EVO hopes to a larger friend of mine this summer and he destroyed them in 2 months (bearings disintegrated), since then I have cracked 2 freehubs. They aren't as durable as they used to be.

  5. #5
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    How the wheels are laced and the spoke count and the spoke type has a big bearing on that, Rager

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulwf150 View Post
    hello everyone, total noob here.
    So I am a Big guy 6'7" 320lbs. been riding my Trek Marlin 29er for about 4 months now and I am starting to have problems with my back wheel. Had to have 3 spokes replaced in the past month and today when I was out riding I managed to bend my stock rear wheel. So I am looking to upgrade the rear wheel. What wheels should I be looking at and what should I look for in a wheel. Plan on upgrading to a full suspension bike around February next year so it would be nice to be able to switch it over to the new bike also. Thanks in advance for any help.
    There are two ways to look at this.

    -You can find/consult/pay a professional to do the job right for you the first time around. Burly rims, durable hubs, appropriate spokes, balanced tension, stress relieved.

    - or -

    -You can go to your most trusted LBS and discuss this with them. They may not be the most knowledgeable on what's out there to solve your particular issues, nor are they likely to be the best wheelbuilders around, but they'll be there 5+ days a week to answer questions or fix problems down the road.

    Either way you're likely to end up satisfied, just in different ways.

    Good luck,

    MC

  7. #7
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    The vocal minority on MTBR seems to have a love affair with Stan's rims (lately, also WTB rims) as well as Hope and Hadley hubs. It's more of a popularity contest thing than a recommendation based on results and findings coming from a detailed examination done by credible analysts. Would love to hear why they would be most suitable for the OP.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    There are two ways to look at this.

    -You can find/consult/pay a professional to do the job right for you the first time around. Burly rims, durable hubs, appropriate spokes, balanced tension, stress relieved.

    - or -

    -You can go to your most trusted LBS and discuss this with them. They may not be the most knowledgeable on what's out there to solve your particular issues, nor are they likely to be the best wheelbuilders around, but they'll be there 5+ days a week to answer questions or fix problems down the road.

    Either way you're likely to end up satisfied, just in different ways.

    Good luck,

    MC
    I plan on going down to the LBS tomorrow and talking to them, I talked to them when I bought the bike there and they said I would eventually have this problem. Just wanted to get some other peoples opinion on the matter. The owner of the shop says I should let them build me a set. I think he said it's going cost around $250-$300. Not really trying to cheap out just wanted to see if there are other options that are just as good for a lower price. And also being new to this and not knowing much about bikes I don't want to get taken advantage of, don't think the LBS would do that but you never know.

    Thanks

  9. #9
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    Hi Paulwf150 welcome to the fold first of all .
    Are you a total noob to MTB or cycling in general ?
    If it's the latter perhaps a day or two on a basic skills course could save you a ton of money ? They would teach you how to "ride light" and to choose the smoothest line .
    Both of these basic skills could ease a lot of pressure on the components and bike in general .
    If you're just blindly crashing through rock gardens and throwing yourself down the trail not much is going to stand up to that kind of punishment for very long regardless of cost or quality .
    This could be a sound investment from a financial standpoint and also you might find you'll enjoy the ride more too .

    When choosing your wheels by all means go to your LBS for advice and even the components . But the wheel will only be as good as the build . Ask some of the locals on your trails where they go and why ;-)
    A $300 wheelset badly built might not last as long as a well built $150 wheelset .

    When it comes to choosing the wheel components look for hubs that use "cartridge" bearings instead of loose balls . That way if the bearings do go south they're relatively easy to swap out cheaply and they tend to last longer than loose ball bearings too . As a general rule of thumb the higher the spoke count the stronger the wheel so my advice would be 36 spokes front and rear . Don't be tempted by "lightweight" parts either . Go for plain gauge spokes (not fancy double / triple butted bladed malarky) and brass nipples . Try and go for a well known named spoke and nipple combo too .

    If you're wanting to carry these new wheels over to your next bike look for hubs that come with swappable axle standards and make sure the parts are readily available and will be for a time to come . It's no use spending your hard earned on something and finding out it takes 6 weeks to get the most basic part to get you running again .

    See if you can get the parts your buddies/LBS recommends any cheaper on line if your on a budget . Then go to your LBS and see if they'll cut you a deal .

    Above all though even for an extra $50 go to a reputable builder you will be $$ better off in the long run .

    Hope this basic info helps some ? Sorry if any of it is patronising in anyway .

    Fat Biker

  10. #10
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    Here's some info from the Clydesdale section--
    29er wheel choice for a big boy

  11. #11
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    I recently bought a Trek Mamba my first bike in 15 years and everything has changed a lot since I raced BMX as a teenager. My first trip to the trail my buddy and I both bent our front rims. His was able to be bent back because he's a 150 soakin wet but me bein 240 mine broke in half. So I started asking friends and my LBS both said Sun Rhinolights or Mavic. I know I had Sun wheels 20 years ago and their still around so they have to be doin somethin right.

  12. #12
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    The newer Bontrager Rhythm wheels look like they got really beefed up. These are their tougher wheels, tougher than their basic XC/trail "Race (X, X Lite, XXX)" line. Forged hub shell, large bearings set wide as possible, optimized spoke "triangulation" (wide flanges and offset spoke bed), hardened steel pawls and drive ring with 54 pt engagement, reinforced rim with reasonably thick walls. It weighs ~1800g, but that weight is certainly put in places where it counts to make it stout while trimming the excess where it wouldn't provide strength. As a "super clyde" you should really be looking at DH stuff, or some hardcore specialty rims like Kris Holm or some really heavy ones like Gordos, if you demand strength, but I have a feeling that these would be up to the task. With a price of $999, it's pretty high end, but not as expensive as Industry 9 Enduro or other competing "tough" high end alloy wheels.

    Bontrager Rhythm Elite trail wheels, shoes, tires - BikeRadar












  13. #13
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    From my testing as a super clyde, 330 lbs, DT Swiss 440 hubs and Sun Ringle MTX33 rims are about the burliest wheel setup you can get. It'll cost you for the hubs, but there is no better way to spend money on a bike than a badass wheelset. I've been running this setup for years now with zero issues. DT Swiss 18 tooth ratchet has been working spectacularly.

  14. #14
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    The new Rythmns certainly look like they've got some sound engineering behind them (from a non engineer ;-) )
    Sweet :-)

    Try and remember guys the OP is a "total noob" and is looking in the $200-$300 range by the sounds of things .
    Is there nothing we can point him to in that budget that may be strong enough ?

    On a budget I think I would steer towards Novatech 881/882 prebuilt from china/taiwan/aisa and then get them stress relieved , tensioned and trued somewhere fairly local (provided they are reputable/good) .

    @paulwf150 the more $$$ you pay the wider choice you'll have of better quality/stronger parts . Pehaps if you could save a while longer and move into the $400-$500 area then you should get some serious kit for that .

    If you are in a tight budget perhaps craigslist of fleabay would provide more bang for your buck in the secondhand market .

    Fat Biker

  15. #15
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    Look for a rear Stan's Flow EX on their 3.30 HD hub. New they run around $300 for the rear wheel only. If you shop around, you might be able to find one cheaper than that.


    Stan's ZTR Flow EX 29 Inch Rear Wheel w/ 3.30 Hub | Stan's No Tubes | Brand | www.PricePoint.com

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by razardica View Post
    How the wheels are laced and the spoke count and the spoke type has a big bearing on that, Rager
    Really? Wasnt aware.....

    His wheels were built up by PWB (who knew his weight) and I'm sure they were 36h if possible.

  17. #17
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    You can get a flow/xt wheel set for $380 from colorado cyclist. I know from experience that they built bomb proof wheels. You could also send an email to lace mine 29 about a wheel set.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by t-ruh View Post
    You can get a flow/xt wheel set for $380 from colorado cyclist. I know from experience that they built bomb proof wheels. You could also send an email to lace mine 29 about a wheel set.
    I wouldn't consider the XT rear freehub body 'bomber" under a 320# rider

    Money would be better spent stepping up to the Hope Pro 2 EVO hubs.
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  19. #19
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    If you want to keep it simple: Call wheelbuilder.com. Tell them your story and go with what they recommend.

    They built an excellent wheel (it's all about even spoke tension) and have customer service that is as good as it gets, at least in my experience.

  20. #20
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    Heavy duty Wheels?

    36 hole Derby rim with Alpine III spokes, long brass nipples and DT 440 hubs built by a MASTER builder. Speeddream, Mike Curiack, old head that has built lots of touring and tandem wheels.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fat Biker View Post
    The new Rythmns certainly look like they've got some sound engineering behind them (from a non engineer ;-) )
    Sweet :-)

    Try and remember guys the OP is a "total noob" and is looking in the $200-$300 range by the sounds of things .
    Is there nothing we can point him to in that budget that may be strong enough ?

    On a budget I think I would steer towards Novatech 881/882 prebuilt from china/taiwan/aisa and then get them stress relieved , tensioned and trued somewhere fairly local (provided they are reputable/good) .

    @paulwf150 the more $$$ you pay the wider choice you'll have of better quality/stronger parts . Pehaps if you could save a while longer and move into the $400-$500 area then you should get some serious kit for that .

    If you are in a tight budget perhaps craigslist of fleabay would provide more bang for your buck in the secondhand market .

    Fat Biker
    Thank you! It's hard to fathom recommending a Chris King/Stans $700 wheel set that will be worth more than his entire bike!

    I'd recommend a WTB i23 with XT hubs, 32 hole. Cheap, reliable (with yearly service), strong, high spoke count. Full wheel set can be had for under $250 by a wheel builder who sells on eBay.
    I collect the best mountain biking deals and write about how to save you money!

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