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  1. #1
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    Fox F29RLC FIT Tuning Advice????

    I have a 120mm RLC with FIT cartridge on my Tallboy. I weigh 195 and ride agressive cross country.

    Any tips for tuning?

    I run at about 80 pounds but just don't feel like the shock is as plush as I would like. I feel like I need to run less air, but not sure I should go any lower.

    Any recommendations?

    thanks
    Matt

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by bowler1 View Post
    I have a 120mm RLC with FIT cartridge on my Tallboy. I weigh 195 and ride agressive cross country.

    Any tips for tuning?

    I run at about 80 pounds but just don't feel like the shock is as plush as I would like. I feel like I need to run less air, but not sure I should go any lower.

    Any recommendations?

    thanks
    Matt
    Where's your LSC set ? How fast is the rebound ? Are your acheiving full travel @ your current air pressure ?

  3. #3
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    LSC is set about 3 clicks out from full compression. Not sure about how much travel I am using. I need to maybe set a zip tie on there and see. I just know I feel like the fork is not as smooth and plush as I would expect, primarily on small to mid size bumps I guess, given that there are not a lot of big hits on the trails I usually ride.

    I guess in that analysis then maybe I need to drop more pressure and maybe use less LSC damping, but afraid that may make the fork wallow.

    Maybe I will give it a try...???

    Just not sure about pressure since I think Fox's recommended initial setting is like 100 or something like that, so I am quite a bit out of that range.

  4. #4
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    I'll be interested to hear the replies on this one. I too run this exact fork and am not impressed with the small bump compliance relative to my back up bikes OEM '10 RL.
    I'm 150#, set for 25% sag @ 75# air (last I checked), compression full counter clockwise, rebound 6 out, and use all of the stroke occasionally. It just doesn't seem very supple yet uses all the stoke but without noticable bottoming out.

  5. #5
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    i have the same F29 120RLC (2011 or 12) on a tallboy C and i weigh about 10lbs more than you. in addtion to playing with the dials, i would say if you dont know if you are using the travel cause you dont have an oring or zip tie travel indicator then you probably arent setting the air pressure by sag. you should try that first as its much better than the psi guidelines and then put a zip tie on there to see if you are using the travel.

    i also fell like my fork was getting harsher over time so i pulled the air piston and found 25CC of lube oil had migrated into the air chamber. once i drained that pulled and put the right amount of float fluid in it the fork regained its travel and small bump sensitivity again. if you do this be sure to lube your foam rings well again too while you have it apart and the buttery feel should come back.

    there is a thread about this migration here... Bath Oil Migrating to top of Air Piston

    also as discussed in the thread, you should remove the foam ring on the air piston head if there is one. hope that helps, good luck.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclutch View Post
    I'll be interested to hear the replies on this one. I too run this exact fork and am not impressed with the small bump compliance relative to my back up bikes OEM '10 RL.
    I'm 150#, set for 25% sag @ 75# air (last I checked), compression full counter clockwise, rebound 6 out, and use all of the stroke occasionally. It just doesn't seem very supple yet uses all the stoke but without noticable bottoming out.
    I'm also in the 150-160 lb. range, and I use 70 psi in mine (120mm FIT RLC 29er). On rougher trails I run the LSC fully counter-clockwise (soft), on smoother trails I set it about half-way (4-5 clicks) to provide some anti-dive. I use nearly full travel, but never bottom out.

    I agree that this fork isn't as plush and doesn't have the small bump compliance that my previous Reba RLT did, but it also feels a lot less flexy than the Reba did.

    Like the o.p. my Fox Float F29 RLC came on my Tallboy. After some rides I noticed that the stanchions seemed really dry, so I opened them up to check the oil, and there was only a few ml of oil in the legs. I added the correct amount of oil, which greatly improved smoothness and small bump compliance, but still not to the level of the Reba.

  7. #7
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    fox fork

    I have had two of those forks and they can be tricky to set up. First I found that my air pressure needed to be about 10 to12 lbs. lower than Fox recc. For me this was low 60 psi to high 50 psi. My LSC worked best at one click in from full soft. Rebound I like fairly loose or quick. The air pressure was the hardest to figure out. IMO go much lower than Fox recc.

  8. #8
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    The oil migration issue caused both of my Fox forks to feel lousy (packed up, ramped up quick, not using full travel...) Removing the oil brought them both back to life. Not impressed with the situation in the first place but it was easily remedied. Seems to be really common.

  9. #9
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    Yeah, maybe I need to run less air pressure. With gear I am 200 pounds and am running 80psi. I felt like that was really low, but maybe it's not.

  10. #10
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    I have 2010 model. Did the air piston modification which increases the air chamber size by 20mm and replaced the seals with the new low friction ones. Now the fork works.

  11. #11
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    The best thing I did with mine was to get it Pushed. Now it's super plush, linear and has full travel. All traits the fork didn't have before.

  12. #12
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    Pushed huh? I thought that they would not do a tune on the FIT forks....only a regular rebuild that I would not think would be any different from what you would get done at your LBS. Maybe I am wrong.

    Not sure what the 20mm modification mentioned above is.....???

    I am not sure what year mine is, but it is pre-Kashima coating so I would guess it is a 2011..???

  13. #13
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    I just re-checked the sag on mine. To get 25% sag I have to set it at 65 pounds....that seems pretty low for a 195 pound rider.....

    I rode around the neighborhood and it felt really soft and with a lot of brake dive.

    I will take it out on the trail today and experiment.

  14. #14
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    I have the same fork. I weigh 180 and set the pressure to ~70 - 75 psi with 1-click from full off compression damping and rebound 4-clicks from full slow to get good small bump response with decent mid-stroke support. I rarely got full travel and was not satisfied with the fork performance ...
    then I sent it to PUSH and got the high volume modification. Now I use 90 - 95 psi with the same settings and the fork gets full travel with much better mid-stroke support. Much more linear response and plush. great small bump compliance. Very happy with the modification.
    what doesn't kill you makes you stronger

  15. #15
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    Did PUSH indicate to you any recommendations (PSI, rebound, etc) when they returned the fork to you? I know that they ask your weight, riding style, etc, up front, so I'm wondering if after they take that all into account when servicing the fork, if they state some ballpark figures for you to work off of.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by jkirkpatri View Post
    Did PUSH indicate to you any recommendations (PSI, rebound, etc) when they returned the fork to you? I know that they ask your weight, riding style, etc, up front, so I'm wondering if after they take that all into account when servicing the fork, if they state some ballpark figures for you to work off of.
    yes PUSH gave detailed suggestions after they completed the tuning. I think they suggested running 10 - 15 psi higher and more middle of the dial rebound and compression settings. That's where I started and I migrated to my present settings over a few rides. I prefer a more plush set-up. A more agressive rider would find he'd blow through the travel where I have it set now.
    what doesn't kill you makes you stronger

  17. #17
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    Cool, thanks for the reply. I`m going to send my Fox to PUSH this winter.

  18. #18
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    Set sag, then play with the clickers. Start with compression damping all the way out( full soft), then back off rebound until the harshness is gone. Try to run as much rebound damping as you can and still be comfortable. You will probably find a spot where 1 or 2 clicks makes all the difference. Then start adding compression damping to control brake dive. Try to run as little compression damping as possible and still get the control you need. Fine tune from there. You might need to take a click out of the rebound, or if the fork still feels wallowy (is that a word?), maybe add some air and start over.
    After you find your best settings, you can use the compression damping to fine tune for the terrain you are on. More if you are going to be on the brakes a lot, or riding harder, less if you can get away with it, for a more comfortable ride.
    After much fiddling, this method has worked best for me.
    My settings:
    210lbs., pressure 97ish, rebound 9 clicks out from full hard, compression 2 clicks out from full hard.

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