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  1. #1
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    Finally Going To Go Tubeless.

    I'm in the final stages of building up my Intense Spider 29 and have decided to give tubeless a try. I've always run tubes on all of my bikes. My new wheels are Sun Ringle' Charger Am Pro's. They came with 2- 2oz bottles of Stan's sealant. My question is...will one bottle be sufficient enough for each wheel? I'm a bit anxious about going tubeless. I've always trusted tubes, but I suppose change can be good.
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  2. #2
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    If you don't spill any... but you'll want a bottle of Stan's on the shelf to add sealant in the future (it dries up).
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  3. #3
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    FWIW I just went tubeless for the first time myself, tried 1 bottle first, and the tire just wouldn't seal, squirted half of another one in it and it sealed right up.
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  4. #4
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    2 oz per tire has been plenty for me

  5. #5
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    2-3 ounces is what it says on their website, I would get a big bottle at your local brick and mortar and put 3 in each one 29ers are generally on the alrger end of that equation

  6. #6
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    If you feel like putting more sealant in, go for it. Don't worry about the weight too much: liquid in the tire doesn't slow down your acceleration as much as solid weight does.

  7. #7
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    I've also got a set of Charger Pros on my Paradox. I've had them since last spring and they have been great. No need for any apprehension about tubeless. They are designed for it. One caveat though. I would only use TLR, 2Bliss, TNT etc. tires. To be on the safe side I'd suggest using 3oz. of sealant. If you can tell the difference you're better than me.

    Great choice, the Intense Spider 29. If I was to get a full suspension, it would be a Spider. My last FS was an Intense 5point5 and I loved it.
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  8. #8
    West Chester, PA
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    Speaking from experience, if you have brand new specialized tires with the control casings, or brand new schwalbe TLR tires, you won't need the sealant to get the tires to hold pressure at all. They start out pretty much airtight. But once the sidewalls start to get scuffed and you get some thorn punctures you'll need to make sure your sealant doesn't dry up completely.

  9. #9
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    Depends on the tires used. Most Tubeless Ready tires need very little sealant to seal up (some none at all). On the other hand using standard tires and converting them to tubeless may take 2-4 oz per tire to seal up.

    Sealant also dries up after time so you're going to need to buy more anyway.
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  10. #10
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    My front tire is a Schwalbe Hans Dampf evo trailstar with snakeskin sidewalls. Rear tire is a Schwalbe Nobby Nic evo pacestar with snakeskin sidewalls. So will I need to use sealant with these tires? As you can tell, this is all new to me. I've been following the tubeless movement for some time, but am now just joining in. Thanks to all of you for you comments.
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  11. #11
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    As far as I'm concerned there is very little reason not to use sealant, other than a few grams, but there are several advantages to use it. Your wheels are not UST and require tape to cover spoke holes. It is possible that the tape is not completely air tight. Also sealant protects against small to moderate punctures which will "seal". I would also recommend initially installing tubes and inflating to 35psi. Leave them over night. The pressure will fully seat the tape and squeeze out any air bubbles.

    Also, as you are using Schwalbe tires and specifically a Nobby Nic, I and others had a minor problem with them. You can see my bike pictured above has Nobby Nics. They tended to get small holes quite frequently but would easily seal with no loss of air.
    The trouble with having an open mind is that people will insist on trying to put things in it.

  12. #12
    West Chester, PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by kevinboyer View Post
    My front tire is a Schwalbe Hans Dampf evo trailstar with snakeskin sidewalls. Rear tire is a Schwalbe Nobby Nic evo pacestar with snakeskin sidewalls. So will I need to use sealant with these tires? As you can tell, this is all new to me. I've been following the tubeless movement for some time, but am now just joining in. Thanks to all of you for you comments.
    Brand new schwalbe TLR tires generally don't NEED the sealant to hold air. But they need sealant to remain airtight as they wear and get scuffed. If the tires are used you need the sealant and you may see a bit of weeping through pinholes on the sidewalls when you first set them up.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by kevinboyer View Post
    My front tire is a Schwalbe Hans Dampf evo trailstar with snakeskin sidewalls. Rear tire is a Schwalbe Nobby Nic evo pacestar with snakeskin sidewalls. So will I need to use sealant with these tires? As you can tell, this is all new to me. I've been following the tubeless movement for some time, but am now just joining in. Thanks to all of you for you comments.
    I haven't used the rims that you are using, but my experience is that the Hans Dampf and Nobby Nic tires are very easy to set up tubeless. If you haven't done it before, here is my recommended procedure:
    1) Tape the rim (unless the Sun Ringle's have a rim strip - then install it)
    2) Install the valve stem
    3) Mount the tire so that both beads of the tire are inside the flanges of the rim. Make sure that the beads are on the outside of the backside of the valve (i.e. covering the rubber part of the valve that ends up inside the tire)
    4) Remove the valve core from the valve stem (I use the tool that NoTubes sells - I'm sure you could do it with a pair of pliers, but the tool is super easy)
    5) Inflate the tire and seat the beads into the rim; I use a compressor because I have one - I wouldn't be surprised if you could mount these with a handpump, although it will depend on how tight the tire/rim interface is; I typically do not inflate past 30 psi
    6) Let all of the air out; with the valve core still out, inject the sealant into the tire. I use anywhere from 2-3 ounces for the initial set up of the tire. The larger the tire, the more sealant I use.
    7) Put the valve core back in; inflate again (typically 20-25 psi)
    8) Holding the wheel flat to the ground, angle the side away from you down a little bit to pool the sealant at one spot. Gently shake up and down while you slowly rotate the tire 360 degrees; flip the tire over so that the other side faces up and repeat. The goal here is to coat the tire/rim interface completely with sealant. From my experience with these tires, this particular step might not be entirely necessary, but it can never hurt.
    9) Go for a ride. If I have time I'll ride on the road for a little bit, but I personally don't consider this mandatory.

    Do yourself a favor and buy the 2 oz tire sealant injector, along with a large container of the sealant. You will want to periodically add more sealant to the tire (every 2-3 months is typical for me), and the injector makes it unnecessary to remove the tire from the rim - it is well worth the money!

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by turnerconvert View Post
    do yourself a favor and buy the 2 oz tire sealant injector, along with a large container of the sealant. You will want to periodically add more sealant to the tire (every 2-3 months is typical for me), and the injector makes it unnecessary to remove the tire from the rim - it is well worth the money!
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by TurnerConvert View Post
    Do yourself a favor and buy the 2 oz tire sealant injector, along with a large container of the sealant. You will want to periodically add more sealant to the tire (every 2-3 months is typical for me), and the injector makes it unnecessary to remove the tire from the rim - it is well worth the money!
    Meh! I've got one and it's not all it's cracked up to be. If you shake up the Stan's properly so that you get sufficient solid latex particles into the syringe, it tends to block up the tube. It's no big deal breaking the bead for a few inches to replenish. In any case you will want to remove any buggers that form.
    The trouble with having an open mind is that people will insist on trying to put things in it.

  16. #16
    human dehumidifier
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    If you have a removable valve core the small 2oz bottles have a pointed tip that will fill through the valve so no injector/syringe is needed.
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  17. #17
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    I've used TLR Nobby Nics without any issues. Some have reported sidewall weeping trouble with Racing Ralphs.

    With the tires you have, you most likely just need to mount the tire, add sealant (the little bottle works well with removable valve cores), inflate to 30-35 psi and shake 'n bounce thoroughly.

    If you lose pressure, double-check that both beads have snapped properly onto the bead shelves, pump back up to 30-35 and repeat the shake. Leaving the tire on its side (a bucket is a useful stand) helps in some cases. I prefer just a vigorous shake, rotate a few degrees, shake, rotate etc. until you've gone all the way around. This way the sealant gets to the entire inner surface.

  18. #18
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    Anyone know the max PSI for Stan's ZTR Arch Ex 29ers? I like to run high, but don't wanna burp.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by GnarBrahWyo View Post
    Anyone know the max PSI for Stan's ZTR Arch Ex 29ers? I like to run high, but don't wanna burp.
    Depends on the size of the tire- from the side of my Arch EXs 29ers:

    1.0 tires - 55 psi
    1.5 tires - 50 psi
    2.0 tires - 43 psi
    2.3 tires - 40 psi
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  20. #20
    West Chester, PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by GnarBrahWyo View Post
    Anyone know the max PSI for Stan's ZTR Arch Ex 29ers? I like to run high, but don't wanna burp.
    You're kind of missing the point if you're going to run a higher pressure than you do with tubes. I run my tires as low as 25lbs and I've never burped them.

  21. #21
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    Going tubeless

    Not all tires tubeless well. Even diff. tires from the same brand don't tubeless the same. I have had great luck with the Specialized tires and they usually air up with a floor pump. For air pressure I run about 25lbs. I have run down to 22 lbs. but I get nervous about burps.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by 92gli View Post
    You're kind of missing the point if you're going to run a higher pressure than you do with tubes. I run my tires as low as 25lbs and I've never burped them.
    I feel if I don't have much pressure in my tires it makes me sluggish.

  23. #23
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    Good job! Thanks.

    I just want to thank all of you for your comments and advice. I spent about an hour yesterday at my LBS who will be doing my build, talking about tubeless set-up. I am now much more at ease and looking forward to this new experience. They have been trying to get me to go tubeless for some time.
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  24. #24
    Rod
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    Quote Originally Posted by kevinboyer View Post
    My front tire is a Schwalbe Hans Dampf evo trailstar with snakeskin sidewalls. Rear tire is a Schwalbe Nobby Nic evo pacestar with snakeskin sidewalls. So will I need to use sealant with these tires? As you can tell, this is all new to me. I've been following the tubeless movement for some time, but am now just joining in. Thanks to all of you for you comments.
    You want to use sealant with any tires. It will keep you from getting flats.
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by GnarBrahWyo View Post
    I feel if I don't have much pressure in my tires it makes me sluggish.
    With or without tubes? Because rolling resistance is reduced once the tube is gone.

    It could also be a case of too narrow tires. If the tires require a lot of pressure to roll well, they are too narrow for MTB use.

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