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  1. #101
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    Only on the interwebz lol.

  2. #102
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    I'm torn between getting a suspension post for my hardtail, or a dropper post. If I go suspension, I would probably get something like the Bodyfloat (which is a highly-rated but costly one).

    Just for kicks I looked to see if anyone makes a combination, and found this cheap one on Jenson:
    KS Exaform Suspension/Dropper Seatpost | Jenson USA

    Since good suspension posts are $150-$300, and good dropper posts are even more expensive, I'm assuming the above wouldn't be great, but I really don't know.

  3. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by wgscott View Post
    I'm torn between getting a suspension post for my hardtail, or a dropper post. If I go suspension, I would probably get something like the Bodyfloat (which is a highly-rated but costly one).

    Just for kicks I looked to see if anyone makes a combination, and found this cheap one on Jenson:
    KS Exaform Suspension/Dropper Seatpost | Jenson USA

    Since good suspension posts are $150-$300, and good dropper posts are even more expensive, I'm assuming the above wouldn't be great, but I really don't know.
    Good droppers aren't all crazy expensive...and there's a reason why suspension posts aren't still popular like back in the 90s when they were all the rage. While not name brand, this one gets good reviews for only $136.

    Brand-X Ascend Dropper Seatpost | Chain Reaction Cycles

    If you don't have internal routing, it's $155 (not sure why)...

    Brand-X Ascend II Dropper Seatpost | Chain Reaction Cycles

  4. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by noapathy View Post
    ...and there's a reason why suspension posts aren't still popular like back in the 90s when they were all the rage.
    Assuming because most people that wanted them have moved on to FS that actually works, which wasn't much of an option back then.

    I used one bitd (USE version) and know a few people that run them on HTs currently.
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  5. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by wgscott View Post
    I'm torn between getting a suspension post for my hardtail, or a dropper post. If I go suspension, I would probably get something like the Bodyfloat (which is a highly-rated but costly one).

    Just for kicks I looked to see if anyone makes a combination, and found this cheap one on Jenson:
    KS Exaform Suspension/Dropper Seatpost | Jenson USA

    Since good suspension posts are $150-$300, and good dropper posts are even more expensive, I'm assuming the above wouldn't be great, but I really don't know.
    Skip the suspension post and get a dropper. You shouldn't be sitting hard on the saddle anyway. Unless you have great flexibility and can high hinge like a mofo, you'd probably be better off being able to lower your saddle. Droppers allow you to lean the bike lower on turns, improve range of motion on descents, and generally provide a better experience out of the saddle. I don't see the benefit to a suspension post, unless you like to ride like a sack of potatoes.

  6. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by s0ckeyeus View Post
    Skip the suspension post and get a dropper. You shouldn't be sitting hard on the saddle anyway. Unless you have great flexibility and can high hinge like a mofo, you'd probably be better off being able to lower your saddle. Droppers allow you to lean the bike lower on turns, improve range of motion on descents, and generally provide a better experience out of the saddle. I don't see the benefit to a suspension post, unless you like to ride like a sack of potatoes.
    This ^

    I see a lot of people justifying the dropper as a need when descending steep difficult terrain. This is true, but I have found that if I leave it dropped for all except climbs, I break habit of sitting and spinning. After having been mtb'ing for over 25 yrs. I have increased my skills way more since getting the dropper due to getting off my @ss.
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  7. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    Assuming because most people that wanted them have moved on to FS that actually works, which wasn't much of an option back then.

    I used one bitd (USE version) and know a few people that run them on HTs currently.
    That's cool. I could never justify the cost when they were "in" and I heard somewhere they mess with your knees, though I don't know how true that is. Now I ride FS, too.

    If I still rode a hardtail off road it'd probably be a plus so the tires would help stop my teeth from rattling.

  8. #108
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    Nope.

    But...

    For us mere mortals, we need all the crutches we can get o_0

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  9. #109
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    Hey Kids, If you can't figure out how a dropper is beneficial, you are probably squandering your money on a helmet. Certainly, a MIPS upgrade would be a waste of money! J

  10. #110
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    If you ride without one, you'll put your eye out.

  11. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by targnik View Post
    Nope.

    But...

    For us mere mortals, we need all the crutches we can get o_0

    'We'll all make it to the top... Some of us, might not make it to the bottom'
    But did you need one before it was ever invented? Most likely not. Many of us didn't need one then or now. and its not like most modern day trails would require it more than trails of old. The opposite actually. Hardtails are more than sufficient for many folks for where they ride. Machine built flow trails? Pffft, Just ride full rigid.

  12. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by HacksawReynolds View Post
    But did you need one before it was ever invented? Most likely not. Many of us didn't need one then or now. and its not like most modern day trails would require it more than trails of old. The opposite actually. Hardtails are more than sufficient for many folks for where they ride. Machine built flow trails? Pffft, Just ride full rigid.
    Good point. Nothing was ever needed before it was invented. Nothing improves on anything. Stupid lights bulbs. Even incrementally. Dumb ass LEDs If it was good enough back then, it is good enough now.

    Everyone else rides machine built for trails. Every ride. No one rides steeps and gnar. Ever. High you were faster on cantilever brakes. Stupid industry making us go with disks.

    You are the only true mountain biker in the universe. Riding your rogue raked trails. Which should be the only way trails are ever made. No matter what.

    Seriously. Do you ever listen to yourself?


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  13. #113
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    Wow

    I'm blown away by how many people say dropper posts aren't revolutionary. They are.

    We have to learn a new way of riding in order to exploit the benefits of a dropper post. Once we stop steering with our thighs, we're able to get it. There's a reason all the DH guys ride with their seat down. Why they go so fast. Riding this way involves learning a new skill. Gain the skill or fail to understand the dropper post's benefits -- might as well sell it.

    The dropper makes us faster everywhere, not just in steeps. Not just in tech. That is if -- IF -- we gain the new-to-us skill of riding with no seat.

    Sure we use our droppers when tackling steep tech. But personally I use mine way more to rail flow (I live in western Oregon, Land of Flow). As my riding buddy Ken told me a couple years ago, "Get a dropper and you won't have to slow down for the corners." It's true, but only after I learned the New Way Of Riding. The skill and the dropper go together. Otherwise the dropper itself will seem superfluous.

    So I got a dropper and I learned to ride a new way. I admit I didn't enjoy going through the learning process. You see I enjoyed steering with my thighs. But I pushed through anyway. Had to -- my buddies were riding away from me.

    It's not just a dropper post. It's a tool. Any new tool must be combined with new skills to employ it, in this case the skill is a new way of descending. Now I stand and pedal on descents. I use my dropper more than I use my shifter. I'll never own another bike without a dropper post. Riding is way more fun now.

    If you're going to ride the same way you always have, don't bother getting a dropper. You won't get it.
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  14. #114
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    When I'm riding out of the saddle with a rigid post, the saddle isn't there either. You require a dropper, many others don't. And I don't steer with my thighs with rigid post.

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    Quote Originally Posted by HacksawReynolds View Post
    When I'm riding out of the saddle with a rigid post, the saddle isn't there either.
    It is for me, big time. The saddle is really in my way. Didn't used to think it was before learning the New Way To Ride. It is now. I can't get nearly as low as I want to unless one of my favorite parts of my anatomy is behind the saddle. A very unsafe place for one of my favorite parts of my anatomy when I'm traveling at high speed over rough terrain.
    We each have to make our own way. By all means go yours, I'll go mine.
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  16. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus View Post
    If you're going to ride the same way you always have, don't bother getting a dropper. You won't get it.
    =sParty
    I agree with all your comments except that piece of tripe, my wife wont change her skills to become faster/radder etc because she just likes to ride and doesnt feel the need to get better, but a dropper has increased her confidence 10 fold on technical stuff without making her faster, and for me that was money well spent.
    So according to you she doesnt get it and shouldnt bother, but according to me (and more importantly her) it was bloody well worth it.
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  17. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by HacksawReynolds View Post
    But did you need one before it was ever invented? Most likely not. Many of us didn't need one then or now. and its not like most modern day trails would require it more than trails of old. The opposite actually. Hardtails are more than sufficient for many folks for where they ride. Machine built flow trails? Pffft, Just ride full rigid.
    Only been riding MTB's as long as droppers have been around ^^

    What did you Luddites do before droppers?

    Work on your Super Man impersonations!?

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  18. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by targnik View Post
    Only been riding MTB's as long as droppers have been around ^^

    What did you Luddites do before droppers?

    Work on your Super Man impersonations!?
    Hey, at least it's good practice for riding with a gimp ball attached to your chest.

  19. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by ridetheridge View Post
    Every time I come across something on youtube or an article regarding dropper posts, people refer to it as the best invention since tubeless.
    I'm going to blow your f*ckin' mind. I don't think tubless is a revolutionary upgrade.

    Quote Originally Posted by ridetheridge View Post
    Is it really that worthwhile of an upgrade ?
    Yeah, it's nice to have. Just like tubeless is nice to have. But I could still ride a mountain bike effectively on the same terrain I do now without either upgrade. In fact, I have done so, on a 20 year old hard tail that has neither tubeless nor a dropper, and runs 26" wheels with cable rim brakes. When I do ride that old hard tail, I still ride the same stuff, and I still have a blast, but I do appreciate the benefits of newer technologies.

  20. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by HacksawReynolds View Post
    its not like most modern day trails would require it more than trails of old. The opposite actually. Hardtails are more than sufficient for many folks for where they ride. Machine built flow trails? Pffft, Just ride full rigid.
    Post the video of you clearing a DH jump flow trail on a rigid with seat at full height.

  21. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by HacksawReynolds View Post
    When I'm riding out of the saddle with a rigid post, the saddle isn't there either. You require a dropper, many others don't. And I don't steer with my thighs with rigid post.
    There's nothing wrong with being content to ride with a standard seatpost, but it's disingenuous to imply that the potential isn't there to ride better with a dropper. Even at the top levels of XC racing, the saddle is never gone. Some of these guys have elite level flexibility, which none of us likely has, and still they make compromises to deal with the saddle. Weight might be a concern for these types of racers, but for the rest of us, the weight penalty is totally worth the payoff.

    In the pic below, this rider could enter the drop lower and bring his butt down at least 6-8 inches if the saddle weren't all up in his business. With the saddle lowered and with his butt down and his back flat, the rider would have more range of motion with his arms to navigate--or even pump--the rocks on the way down, instead of being forced to have his arms at full extension. He'd likely be able to ride this one section faster and quite a bit more comfortably. If he were just fooling around and feeling frisky, he could hit the drop at speed, shoot over the first rock, and land on the second big rock, something I'm sure he wouldn't try with the saddle up.


  22. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmg71 View Post
    I agree with all your comments except that piece of tripe, my wife wont change her skills to become faster/radder etc because she just likes to ride and doesnt feel the need to get better, but a dropper has increased her confidence 10 fold on technical stuff without making her faster, and for me that was money well spent.
    So according to you she doesnt get it and shouldnt bother, but according to me (and more importantly her) it was bloody well worth it.
    Agreed. Sorry for the tripe.
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  23. #123
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    So, I don't race, have flow trails, or big mountains, just little ridges here and there. I'm supposed to drop my saddle for every roll down or 30' descent? I have really long legs and can move around the saddle just fine. What am I missing?

  24. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus View Post
    It's true, but only after I learned the New Way Of Riding. The skill and the dropper go together. Otherwise the dropper itself will seem superfluous.

    So I got a dropper and I learned to ride a new way.

    If you're going to ride the same way you always have, don't bother getting a dropper. You won't get it.
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    Funny thing is, I've been riding DH since 1998 and have put in hundreds of days of lift riding in the old days before grooming and flow were a thing. Also been riding BMX bikes for quite a number of years and still ride park/pump/DJ very regularly. There is nothing whatsoever new to me about riding with a slammed seat.

    I think that guys coming from a strict XC background that have always run their seats at the tippy-top of adjustment range are much more likely to see lowering it as some sort of 'new' breakthrough in riding style. To some of though, it's nothing new about it at all. I completely get the purpose and advantage of a low seat for certain riding, but I encounter very little when riding XC that makes me feel my seat needs to move. I also don't run my seat jacked to the sky at all times to begin with.

    I look at droppers a just another choice, like how many gears, what size tires, how much suspension (if any), etc. There are fan-boys and marketing victims of every single variation of those things that swear up and down that if you can't really ride if you didn't buy the same gizmo that they bought, just like dropper posts. It's a gear-dork / internet thing, and it's pretty amusing.

    Nothing wrong with using one of it works for you, but thinking everyone needs one is a joke.
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  25. #125
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    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    So, I don't race, have flow trails, or big mountains, just little ridges here and there. I'm supposed to drop my saddle for every roll down or 30' descent? I have really long legs and can move around the saddle just fine. What am I missing?
    you are missing the fact that if you don't do what everyone else does, you are not doing it "correct", and therefore, irrelevant/stupid/"missing out on something"/scared...

    don't you get it...we all HAVE to ride the same way....
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  26. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    What am I missing?
    4' drops? Dicey descents? Fun?

    Just kidding of course, I have no dropper either but IME drops and steep, chunky downhills are more fun with the seat slammed but since I'm an xc roadie kind of guy I ain't got the time or patience to stop and lower my antiquated non-dropper post so I just bomb everything with my seat at the tippy-top of it's adjustment range and hope for the best
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  27. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    I just bomb everything with my seat at the tippy-top of it's adjustment range and hope for the best
    at least when your ar5e puckers, it grabs the seat ........
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  28. #128
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    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    So, I don't race, have flow trails, or big mountains, just little ridges here and there. I'm supposed to drop my saddle for every roll down or 30' descent? I have really long legs and can move around the saddle just fine. What am I missing?
    How are you on the pump track with the saddle all the way up? Now imagine hitting the trail like it was a pump track and riding with the saddle up. I can ride fine with the saddle at full height, but riding with the saddle down allows for much more dynamic riding.

  29. #129
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    I'm a bit of a weight weenie, as I'm 65 and when I ride a trail that climbs 3000 feet with my 27 year old son, I want every advantage I can get. But, there are a few components that add weight that I'm not going to do without including big tires, a comfortable saddle and a dropper post.

  30. #130
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    I look at droppers a just another choice, like how many gears, what size tires, how much suspension (if any), etc.
    I tend to agree. Maybe it's just because I mountain biked for many years without one, but I definitely don't see it as a must for proper riding, or somesuch bullshit.

    I do I like them, and choose to use one because it improves my experience. Just like many other technologies (tubeless, hydraulic brakes, 1X gearing, slack geometry, etc).

  31. #131
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    Hmmm.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Dropper post ?  Do you really need one ?-hite_rite_ad_from_fat_tire_flyer_vol_5_no_4_1985.jpg  

    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  32. #132
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    That photo is a perfect example of why I love having a dropper post, I do not miss that feeling of being "at the end of my rope" arms straight one leg almost locked out seat in gut... once you set your kinda done, no where to go till the ride is over Not so bad if you had some speed/momentum but on really slow chunk or spots with a hard turn at the bottom was sketchy at best.

    one of the main reasons I rode bikes ever so slightly small for me or with the seat a tiny bit lower than ideal back in the olden times.

    Quote Originally Posted by s0ckeyeus View Post
    There's nothing wrong with being content to ride with a standard seatpost, but it's disingenuous to imply that the potential isn't there to ride better with a dropper. Even at the top levels of XC racing, the saddle is never gone. Some of these guys have elite level flexibility, which none of us likely has, and still they make compromises to deal with the saddle. Weight might be a concern for these types of racers, but for the rest of us, the weight penalty is totally worth the payoff.

    In the pic below, this rider could enter the drop lower and bring his butt down at least 6-8 inches if the saddle weren't all up in his business. With the saddle lowered and with his butt down and his back flat, the rider would have more range of motion with his arms to navigate--or even pump--the rocks on the way down, instead of being forced to have his arms at full extension. He'd likely be able to ride this one section faster and quite a bit more comfortably. If he were just fooling around and feeling frisky, he could hit the drop at speed, shoot over the first rock, and land on the second big rock, something I'm sure he wouldn't try with the saddle up.


  33. #133
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    After riding for 25 years or so my newest bike has my first dropper. Kinda wanted to try one on my Heckler a few years back but I had it set up with a layback Thompson post that got me where I needed to be so the dropper was out.

    I ride New England singletrack so there's lots of tech sections where I've found it to be better. Found that I need to force myself to use it (old habits) but I'm getting used to it. Being 6'4" I've always had to find a happy medium for seat height so I now appreciate the ability to easily extend FULLY on climbs then drop it for everything else.
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  34. #134
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    4' drops? Dicey descents? Fun?

    Just kidding of course, I have no dropper either but IME drops and steep, chunky downhills are more fun with the seat slammed but since I'm an xc roadie kind of guy I ain't got the time or patience to stop and lower my antiquated non-dropper post so I just bomb everything with my seat at the tippy-top of it's adjustment range and hope for the best
    4' drops? I see those on some vids. I do about 1-2', max. Dicey descents? Ever pedal in New England? Every ride has some, some on every trail.

  35. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by s0ckeyeus View Post
    How are you on the pump track with the saddle all the way up? Now imagine hitting the trail like it was a pump track and riding with the saddle up. I can ride fine with the saddle at full height, but riding with the saddle down allows for much more dynamic riding.
    I don't ride on pump tracks or flow trails for the most part. Riding with the saddle down? Doesn't that hurt your knees?

  36. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    I don't ride on pump tracks or flow trails for the most part. Riding with the saddle down? Doesn't that hurt your knees?
    You generally don't pedal seated while the saddle is down all the way. So no, it doesn't hurt the knees. I run my saddle a little higher with a dropper than with a standard post. A dropper might actually help out my knees in that regard.

  37. #137
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    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    4' drops? I see those on some vids. I do about 1-2', max. Dicey descents? Ever pedal in New England? Every ride has some, some on every trail.

    I'd never say that any of that stuff can't be done without a dropper but try this- find the biggest drop you think you can handle and do it with seat at normal height and then try it again with it about 5 or 6 inches lower and report back with which version was less scary. Try the same experiment on the steepest and sketchiest downhill run you can find at max speed.

    That's not the kind of stuff I ride all the time but I imagine if it was a dropper might be as important as suspension is, maybe more so.


    The pic a few posts up is a perfect example, you can get'er done while high posting it (I do) but it's less than ideal in some situations and it can look pretty ridiculous.
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  38. #138
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy3220 View Post
    Post the video of you clearing a DH jump flow trail on a rigid with seat at full height.
    Don't get me started on "flow" trails of any kind......

  39. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    I'd never say that any of that stuff can't be done without a dropper but try this- find the biggest drop you think you can handle and do it with seat at normal height and then try it again with it about 5 or 6 inches lower and report back with which version was less scary. Try the same experiment on the steepest and sketchiest downhill run you can find at max speed.

    That's not the kind of stuff I ride all the time but I imagine if it was a dropper might be as important as suspension is, maybe more so.


    The pic a few posts up is a perfect example, you can get'er done while high posting it (I do) but it's less than ideal in some situations and it can look pretty ridiculous.
    The seat is not in the equation for a 2 ft drop. At speed I'm doing a bunny hop or a front wheel loft hovering over the seat, extend the legs, back wheel lands first then the front wheel sets down, not seated. Downhill run? of 100 ft or so? Really not trying to be pissy here, never used one, been mt biking for almost 20 years. Managing fine without one. Most of the users I know have issues and breakdowns all the time, plus crap results in real winter with the droppers.

  40. #140
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    I guess one benefit no one is taking about is some droppers might act like a suspension seatpost if in need of a bleeding ? True?

    I'm kinda liking the idea of that! Cush and drop. Best of both worlds.

    Or are there manufacturers already designing in x-amount of vertical compliance at full extension into their droppers?

  41. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    The seat is not in the equation for a 2 ft drop. At speed I'm doing a bunny hop or a front wheel loft hovering over the seat, extend the legs, back wheel lands first then the front wheel sets down, not seated. Downhill run? of 100 ft or so? Really not trying to be pissy here, never used one, been mt biking for almost 20 years. Managing fine without one. Most of the users I know have issues and breakdowns all the time, plus crap results in real winter with the droppers.
    To each his own, but I have been riding mountain bikes, since before you could buy one in a store. I love my droppers, one on both bikes and no issues with either so far, one is over two years old. I will admit, I moved south years ago and never ride in real cold weather, so that may be a real issue.

    And unless you are good enough to manual through the whole drop or jump, back wheel landings are not the recommended method. Personally I am crap with manuals. I was way better at getting the front wheel up when I was young. Now can't do one at all with the seat up, can barely hold one for a full second with the seat down. But when going over a drop, not a all to almost a second is huge.

  42. #142
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    I think the biggest difference for me is that there is no compromise. Sure I could do whole rides with my seat at maximum height for efficiency, but the trails I like to ride mean it's much more pleasant with the seat down. So pre-dropper I would set my seat at a compromised height, not DH low, not XC high. Anything nasty and I would step off and drop the seat.
    Now I can get maximum efficiency from pressing a button and having my seat come up, or press the same button and have it drop down to a DH position. As others have mentioned, I will drop it for corners, so I can tip the bike over. I was a hold out for a long time, but now I've got one it's made trail riding even more enjoyable.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus View Post
    It is for me, big time. The saddle is really in my way. Didn't used to think it was before learning the New Way To Ride. It is now. I can't get nearly as low as I want to unless one of my favorite parts of my anatomy is behind the saddle. A very unsafe place for one of my favorite parts of my anatomy when I'm traveling at high speed over rough terrain.
    We each have to make our own way. By all means go yours, I'll go mine.
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    I have several FS bikes and one hardtail that I ride on technical trails. What I want is a dropper suspension post. The Thudbuster design could be adapted to a dropper very easily.

    Does anyone make a dropper suspension post? And I don't mean a Reverb with blown seals, which is kind of like that!

  45. #145
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    Quote Originally Posted by targnik View Post
    What did you Luddites do before droppers?


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    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    I have several FS bikes and one hardtail that I ride on technical trails. What I want is a dropper suspension post. The Thudbuster design could be adapted to a dropper very easily.

    Does anyone make a dropper suspension post? And I don't mean a Reverb with blown seals, which is kind of like that!
    Ride out of the saddle thru the tech and chunk. Use your body for your suspension. It's the best most reliable suspension available and has been proven over millions of years.

  47. #147
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    Quote Originally Posted by wgscott View Post
    Pfft, we didn't have that new-fangled tech.

    Quote Originally Posted by HacksawReynolds View Post
    Ride out of the saddle thru the tech and chunk. Use your body for your suspension. It's the best most reliable suspension available and has been proven over millions of years.
    There you go.

  48. #148
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    Quote Originally Posted by wgscott View Post
    I'm thinking about buying one of those for my CX bike; doesn't seem like it is worth the money for a dropper. I'll just adjust it when I go from road to trail and then back when I get back to road.
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  49. #149
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    Quote Originally Posted by HacksawReynolds View Post
    Ride out of the saddle thru the tech and chunk. Use your body for your suspension. It's the best most reliable suspension available and has been proven over millions of years.
    Got some news for you. We have trails in CO and UT where the entire trail is tech and chunk. Also, climbing very steep sections out of the saddle is impossible in the loose rock here, because you lose traction.

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    The guys I ride with regularly all have droppers at this point, most have for a year or two at least now. We were talking about this the other night as two of the guys were dealing with dropper related issues.

    Universally, they all stated that they have to make a point of using the damned things or they just wouldn't bother, in other words, they rarely get used, and when they are, it's not because it's really necessary.

    At this point, on average, each guy uses their dropper less than once per ride.

    Hm, ok, so maybe not required, but could be super nice once in a while and could possibly save your ass when the moon's blue, might as well have one.

    Except...combine that with the fact that the single most common component to be malfunctioning, broken, slightly annoying etc among all of us is their damned dropper posts!

    I'M tired of how often the damned things need servicing and I don't even have one!

    While a few of them wouldn't mind trying out some other droppers than what they have, just to see if there is anything better out there, they ALL agree that they're done spending money on them and the next failure they won't get them repaired or replaced. Two have already gone back to standard seatposts.

    Yes, I understand, there ARE places where a good reliable dropper would be a benefit and actually be useful regularly. That is not everywhere. That is not where we live and ride. They are a frustrating expense that is not alleviated by the benefits they provide, FOR US IN OUR CIRCUMSTANCES.

    So as with most things bike I have to conclude as I usually do: What works for you is awesome, what works for me is awesome, kindly leave defining what that actually is to ME, and I'll do the same for YOU.

  51. #151
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    Quote Originally Posted by HacksawReynolds View Post
    Ride out of the saddle thru the tech and chunk. Use your body for your suspension. It's the best most reliable suspension available and has been proven over millions of years.
    Yep. Bodies are the best suspension, which is why pros in all disciplines use rigid bikes... no, wait a second, they don't. They use shocks and squishy forks.



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    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    Got some news for you. We have trails in CO and UT where the entire trail is tech and chunk. Also, climbing very steep sections out of the saddle is impossible in the loose rock here, because you lose traction.
    Tech and chunk? We got that here in New England as well. But our climbs and descents? Sometimes only little ridges here and there. Our advantage for sometimes climbing out of the saddle is that sort of smooth granite has endless traction. YRMV.

  53. #153
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    Quote Originally Posted by WaywardTraveller View Post
    So as with most things bike I have to conclude as I usually do: What works for you is awesome, what works for me is awesome, kindly leave defining what that actually is to ME, and I'll do the same for YOU.
    Perfectly stated. Perfectly! I can't even describe how much I agree with this sentiment.

    Quote Originally Posted by WaywardTraveller View Post
    Universally, they all stated that they have to make a point of using the damned things or they just wouldn't bother, in other words, they rarely get used, and when they are, it's not because it's really necessary.

    At this point, on average, each guy uses their dropper less than once per ride.
    Amazing! This points up the startling difference between your riding style &/or terrain compared to mine. I use my dropper more than I use my shifter. Not kidding. Where I ride, I pity -- no exaggeration -- people without dropper posts. I'm absolutely certain they're not having half the fun riding their bikes as those who employ dropper posts and know how to use them. But that's on MY terrain and specifically for MY riding style which is rowdy.

    Quote Originally Posted by WaywardTraveller View Post
    Yes, I understand, there ARE places where a good reliable dropper would be a benefit and actually be useful regularly. That is not everywhere. That is not where we live and ride.
    With no disrespect intended whatsoever, there's little uncertainty in my mind that where you live and ride is not where I want to live and ride. Personally I love the edge, and I believe riding near the edge requires -- yeah, I'd even say requires -- a dropper. The dropper opened riding opportunities for me that I would not have been able to take advantage of previously. But that's ME. I get it. I'm just not going back to the way I used to ride. Ever. The new way is so much more exciting and fun. For me.
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  54. #154
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    To follow up on what I wrote moments ago, watch this vid:
    https://youtu.be/67iYOZVxiPY
    ...and notice where this fellow's saddle is throughout the vid.

    All the way down.

    Look for example at 1:30 when he's landing the jump. Saddle is slammed yet his thigh is touching the top of the saddle. I can't imagine how pushed forward he'd be if his saddle were up. He'd be so bunched up he'd probably crash land.

    Let's go a step farther. Let's imagine he lacks a dropper so his saddle was all the way up but he manages to get behind his saddle and then suffers a bad landing. OMG, I can't even imagine the distress he'd endure tangling with the saddle. Even post-recovery his girlfriend might no longer have use of him.

    Now, for folks who aren't riding in this style, perhaps a dropper is superfluous. However I employ mine even for small booters, kickers & drops -- I don't need anything big to love it. Even just going really fast on virtually any downhill, anytime, anywhere. Heck I've come to appreciate my dropper so much that if/when I ever get a road bike, I'll put a dropper on that, too. Not kidding. Before getting a dropper and really learning how to exploit it, I didn't know what I didn't know.

    But that's ME. Not saying everyone should value the dropper or even value riding in the manner that I ride. But for those of us who do enjoy this type of riding, the dropper is a godsend. It is as valued an improvement as tubeless tires, suspension, trail geometry, thru-axles, etc.

    Not trying to get anyone to change their mind. Just explaining why some riders feel the dropper is a necessity. They way some of us use our bikes, it simply is. For other riders, less so.
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  55. #155
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    Are short-legged people at a disadvantage for similar reasons?

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    This again? Ok I'll bite...

    Getting your body weight to the correct position essential in mountain biking. A dropper post allows you a much wider range in getting your body weight back, or lower to the ground, without putting your body in an awkward position.

    How much that benefits you depends on the trails you ride, your bike geo and setup, body dimensions, and yes technique and skills.

    I'm a clyde, and with all that weight up high, it's a huge advantage. My friend and I both ride Banshee Primes - he's on a medium, I'm on an XL (and might prefer an XXL if they made one). We both have droppers, but he rarely uses his. I maintain his bike, and even with the post extended it feels fully dropped for me. I measured, and with my 100mm post fully dropped, the distance between the crank and seat is a tad longer on my bike IIRC.

    Our skill level is about the same. He would say a dropper is no big deal. I would say it's a huge advantage.

  57. #157
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    Not sure why this is in the 29er section, but a dropper was a total game changer with me. I see no need to ever ride a mountain bike without one again.

  58. #158
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    I couldn't really see dropper posts being worth either the cost or the potential killing a ride if they failed but eventually tried one and was surprised how much I liked it. I hadn't got on with my Stache for a while so decided it was worth trying a dropper post and it transformed the ride for me as I found it much easier to ride drops and steep sections plus just ride a lot faster as it felt like I could move the bike around more which in turn makes the Stache really shine.

    I was curious how I'd get on with the fat bike when coming back into winter but after the first ride, I fitted a dropper post to it as well.

    With mountain biking there's certainly a lot more 'want' than 'need' but personally will be keeping a dropper post on my bikes.

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  59. #159
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    Mountain bikes are not a need, anything more than running naked and barefoot through the woods is a crutch.
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  60. #160
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    Quote Originally Posted by IPunchCholla View Post
    Yep. Bodies are the best suspension, which is why pros in all disciplines use rigid bikes... no, wait a second, they don't. They use shocks and squishy forks.



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  61. #161
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    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    Got some news for you. We have trails in CO and UT where the entire trail is tech and chunk. Also, climbing very steep sections out of the saddle is impossible in the loose rock here, because you lose traction.
    Got some news for you. I've lived and ridden in both of those states. Sorry to tell ya, but neither of those states are very unique as far as tech, chunk, and looseness goes.

    For climbing loose/tech a rigid bike/post is just fine.

    Come to New England sometime.
    Last edited by HacksawReynolds; 04-04-2018 at 06:43 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WaywardTraveller View Post
    Universally, they all stated that they have to make a point of using the damned things or they just wouldn't bother, in other words, they rarely get used, and when they are, it's not because it's really necessary.

    At this point, on average, each guy uses their dropper less than once per ride.
    Wow that's crazy. I use my dropper about as often as I use my gear shifter, maybe more?

    If I barely used the thing once per ride I would totally sell it and go with a rigid post. Lighter and more reliable.

    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    Got some news for you. We have trails in CO and UT where the entire trail is tech and chunk. Also, climbing very steep sections out of the saddle is impossible in the loose rock here, because you lose traction.
    Learn to hover above the seat, young padawan. Long ago, in the time before suspension, this was the way of the hardtail warrior.

  63. #163
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    Quote Originally Posted by kpdemello View Post
    Learn to hover above the seat, young padawan. Long ago, in the time before suspension, this was the way of the hardtail warrior.
    Worked then and it works now. Just fine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by HacksawReynolds View Post
    Worked then and it works now. Just fine.
    Even with your dropper slammed.
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  65. #165
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus View Post
    Even with your dropper slammed.
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    I think it is even easier with the post down! I often lower mine for real chunky climbs, then pop it up to xc height when the time comes to spin again.

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  66. #166
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    Quote Originally Posted by IPunchCholla View Post
    I think it is even easier with the post down! I often lower mine for real chunky climbs, then pop it up to xc height when the time comes to spin again.
    Totally agree! Modern trail bike geo includes a properly steep seat angle. With my seat up, the saddle's nose occasionally bumps my ass while standing & pedaling. So I drop it before standing -- presto, room to move around & shift my weight however needed. Whenever I want to sit down again I hit the bar-mounted lever and bang! -- the saddle's right back where I want it. Sweet.
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    Until it isn't......😜

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    Quote Originally Posted by s0ckeyeus View Post

    In the pic below...

    Here, let me help you with that:

    Dropper post ?  Do you really need one ?-xc-mtb-racing-2-.jpg
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  69. #169
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    Quote Originally Posted by HacksawReynolds View Post
    Until it isn't......😜
    I know a guy who quit mountain biking because he got a flat tire once.
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  70. #170
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    I love how this thread became a p!ssing contest...

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  71. #171
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    The curmudgeons need something to brag about and dropper post threads are their opportunity.

  72. #172
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    If you ride on trail everyday they are a need. Don’t tell god or my my family - first priority

  73. #173
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    I'm doing my first dropper-less race soon & I'm quietly dreading the downs o_0

    The speed I'll lose on the descents, hopefully I'll make back on the ups ^^

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  74. #174
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus View Post
    I know a guy who quit mountain biking because he got a flat tire once.
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  75. #175
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Here, let me help you with that:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	XC-MTB-Racing (2).jpg 
Views:	77 
Size:	75.0 KB 
ID:	1191339
    Maybe I'm slow, but I'm not seeing how straightening out that picture I pulled from web changes the discussion.

  76. #176
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    Quote Originally Posted by s0ckeyeus View Post
    Maybe I'm slow, but I'm not seeing how straightening out that picture I pulled from web changes the discussion.
    No slower than me. Admit I'm mystified as to the benefit of cropping, straightening & enlarging the photo...
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  77. #177
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus View Post
    Admit I'm mystified as to the benefit of cropping, straightening & enlarging the photo...
    =sParty

    No matter how much you doctor it up it's still a ridiculous position to be on a bike given the circumstances, yes, XC pros are great riders and fast as fvk but even though they make it work it's far from optimal as far as safety, ergonomics and control are concerned.
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  78. #178
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    No matter how much you doctor it up it's still a ridiculous position to be on a bike given the circumstances, yes, XC pros are great riders and fast as fvk but even though they make it work it's far from optimal as far as safety, ergonomics and control are concerned.
    Really?

    Again, why people worry so much about what other people do or how they do it completely mystifies me. Please read what you wrote again, then think about the subject in the picture you're discussing.

    Seriously, you throw a 'but' in there like you have some superior all knowing knowledge of the true one right way...as a response to how the very best XC rider in the world is...well...being the very best XC rider in the world.

    I do believe he would state as matter of fact that you are simply wrong.

    Apply your feelings about your own riding to yourself, then by all means, why would one argue what works for YOU.

    But seriously, what exactly motivates all of you that insist that those that don't use droppers are doing it wrong? Why do you care? What's wrong with your egos that you need this?

    Go ride your damned bikes, dropper or no dropper.

  79. #179
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    Dropper Post? Do you really need one?

    Yeah, all 185mm.
    I'll freely admit I've completely lost the skill and muscle memory to get behind the saddle. No doubt I can weight, jump, jive, and juke orders of magnitude better with the seat gone. Fine tuning pedaling saddle height to the terrain on the fly is a pleasure.

    I didn't read this whole thread because it's silly and a copy/paste of all the other ones so maybe this has been posed already.
    Take a good rider on just about any bike. Do two laps on challenging terrain. One lap with the rigid seat post and one lap with the dropper. Which lap will the rider be faster? Which lap will the rider have more fun? Which lap will be more fatiguing? Which lap will have the extra confidence to huck, pop, and charge that sketchy trail feature a little harder? Rhetorical of course.
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  80. #180
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    Quote Originally Posted by WaywardTraveller View Post
    Really?

    Again, why people worry so much about what other people do or how they do it completely mystifies me. Please read what you wrote again, then think about the subject in the picture you're discussing.

    Seriously, you throw a 'but' in there like you have some superior all knowing knowledge of the true one right way...as a response to how the very best XC rider in the world is...well...being the very best XC rider in the world.

    I do believe he would state as matter of fact that you are simply wrong.

    Apply your feelings about your own riding to yourself, then by all means, why would one argue what works for YOU.

    But seriously, what exactly motivates all of you that insist that those that don't use droppers are doing it wrong? Why do you care? What's wrong with your egos that you need this?

    Go ride your damned bikes, dropper or no dropper.


    You either misunderstood what I wrote or I didn't communicate my thoughts well, or maybe both.

    I don't think anyone is doing it wrong, especially the pro in the pic. Just saying that as far as control and safety goes its sub-optimal to say the least, and it also looks a little silly. IMHO.

    btw I also look like a clown in my tight lycra and jacked up seat on my carbon xc weenie bike but I don't care and could give zero fvks how anyone else on the trail dresses or rides.
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    You either misunderstood what I wrote or I didn't communicate my thoughts well, or maybe both.

    I don't think anyone is doing it wrong, especially the pro in the pic. Just saying that as far as control and safety goes its sub-optimal to say the least, and it also looks a little silly. IMHO.

    btw I also look like a clown in my tight lycra and jacked up seat on my carbon xc weenie bike but I don't care and could give zero fvks how anyone else on the trail dresses or rides.
    Nope, no judgement at all /s

    I'm pretty sure I understand exactly what you are communicating here. I'm feeling a real lack of self awareness may be at play.

  82. #182
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    Quote Originally Posted by WaywardTraveller View Post
    Nope, no judgement at all /s

    I'm pretty sure I understand exactly what you are communicating here. I'm feeling a real lack of self awareness may be at play.
    Uncle, you got me! I get off on judging other riders and silently mock them as I shred by their sorry asses. Even though I don't have one I think anyone else who doesn't use a dropper is basically an idiot. Super high seat positions are optimal for chunky downhills and drops and DH pros will eventually realize this and adopt that position
    I brake for stinkbugs

  83. #183
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Uncle, you got me! I get off on judging other riders and silently mock them as I shred by their sorry asses. Even though I don't have one I think anyone else who doesn't use a dropper is basically an idiot. Super high seat positions are optimal for chunky downhills and drops and DH pros will eventually realize this and adopt that position
    Whatever you're smokin', mind passing it around?

  84. #184
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    Can't believe he hasn't been mentioned so I will take this thread to where it's heading anyway. Hitler.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  85. #185
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    Quote Originally Posted by WaywardTraveller View Post
    Whatever you're smokin', mind passing it around?

    Got some killer angel dust, come on over.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  86. #186
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    I honestly Im basically with JB on this. Top racers can do things the rest of us are like "WTF, how???" Cause their that good. But having ridden without a dropper for years and now have one I get the point to a point.

    Like the pic there, one slightly wrong move and thats broken bones on that section with the position hes in. Simply really high COG and arms about locked. Those guys can pull that stuff off and make it look easy. But even reading the dropper discussions where guys like him (not saying that specific rider, but top racers in general) wonder if the benefits of a dropper would overcome the weight penalty. No definitive answers but many wonder because going down tech its really sketchy with the seat all the way up.

    This is where I find a dropper useful. Seat at road height and then when time comes it can be dropped easily. No more making sacrifices in climbing efficiency (and damn it made a difference with my seat being at my road bike height) and not feel like Im playing chicken with an ambulance on the way back down.

    But thats where the benefits for a dropper stop for me. It takes time and thus loss of speed to try and use it to the point that it helps on every corner, every section. Which is why I think the racers are up in the air on them. Each time you use it you loose pedaling input briefly. May cost too much speed to be beneficial overall.

    There is no arguement to be made for any rider, low COG is better for tech and descents. Simple physics there. A dropper allows that on the go. Being up like in the pic is well below optimal for bike handling and crash risk is insanely high. But those guys have the skills to deal with it and come out the other side.

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  87. #187
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    I think dropper post are like guns and gay marriage. Lots of people are passionate about it, when it should be don't want one don't get one.

  88. #188
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cerberus75 View Post
    dropper post are like guns and gay marriage…
    There's got to be a great joke in there!
    There are two types of people in this world:
    1) Those who can extrapolate from incomplete data

  89. #189
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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Bickle View Post
    Can't believe he hasn't been mentioned so I will take this thread to where it's heading anyway. Hitler.
    Hitler road Enduro. He'd probably have ridden a dropper if they had been invented by then.

    Mountain bikers are generally a rational bunch...until someone moves a rock on our favorite trail and we lose our minds - LMN

  90. #190
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cerberus75 View Post
    I think dropper post are like guns and gay marriage. Lots of people are passionate about it, when it should be don't want one don't get one.
    More like gay marriage.

    It's where people who have never tried it try to tell those that have tried it what it's like.

  91. #191
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    Quote Originally Posted by richde View Post
    More like gay marriage.

    It's where people who have never tried it try to tell those that have tried it what it's like.
    So what's gay marriage like, richde?

  92. #192
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    Lol!
    Keep the analogies cuming. Finaly a dropper thread where mm's matter
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  93. #193
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    Quote Originally Posted by ray.vermette View Post
    Hitler road Enduro. He'd probably have ridden a dropper if they had been invented by then.





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    Ride more; post less...

  94. #194
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    Quote Originally Posted by WaywardTraveller View Post
    I'm feeling a real lack of self awareness may be at play.
    That does appear to be the case.

  95. #195
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    Did my first dropper-post-less event & here are my thoughts ;-P

    There were a couple of times per lap where the seat would sneak up & try & toss me over the bars...

    As, it wasn't totally unexpected - I managed/dealt w/ it accordingly ^^ I told it to f-off!!

    There were 3 or 4 good downs (unfortunately there were a lot more ups!), & on a couple of them... I definitely could have gone quicker w/ the seat dropped a couple of inches.

    One unexpected issue/experience was the greater fatigue on the arms i.e. particularly the forearms. I can explain this as, being in a more forward bias position - there was more weight on the arms & less on the legs.

    Will I stick w/ a fixed seat post for endurance type events?

    Probably not... although, it depends on when my Shim turns up o_0

    To my mind, I would have been faster on the downs & they would've been more enjoyable.

    Will lugging around an extra 200+g hurt my times?

    I would likely be more relaxed w/ the dropper & likely less fatigued.

    Proviso being... my next up coming event has no major downs or ups >.<

    'We'll all make it to the top... Some of us, might not make it to the bottom'
    Last edited by targnik; 04-08-2018 at 01:51 PM.
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  96. #196
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    Quote Originally Posted by HacksawReynolds View Post
    When I'm riding out of the saddle with a rigid post, the saddle isn't there either. You require a dropper, many others don't. And I don't steer with my thighs with rigid post.
    Wow... good for you.

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