Results 1 to 25 of 25
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: millertm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    461

    Changing out 6 bolt rotors

    I just upgraded from M446 hydro brakes to M785 (XT finned) and now have the Ice Tech rotors to replace. Is there any special tools needed (other then an allen wrench) to change out these rotors?

    Thanks,

    Mark
    2012 XXL Carve Expert

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    713
    torx t-25 wrench. not a hex.
    Small ring in front makes it easier. Small ring in back makes it harder. That blows my mind.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    3,267
    I think that's about it. I'm pretty sure that's it. Make sure you have a rubber mallet nearby. Oh, don't forget about a slide ruler too. And lets not forget a nice set of veneer calipers.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Bike Whisperer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    1,690
    Rotor bolts are generally Torx T25, not Allen bolts.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: millertm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    461
    Thanks Guys, I thought I would save some mony at the LBS by doing it myself.

    Mark
    2012 XXL Carve Expert

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    713
    If you have a bike specific multi tool, they usually have one on there.
    Small ring in front makes it easier. Small ring in back makes it harder. That blows my mind.

  7. #7
    ready to ride
    Reputation: mattnmtns's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    602
    You can also pick up a torx key set for less than $5 at lowes.

  8. #8
    AZ
    AZ is offline
    banned
    Reputation: AZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    19,999
    Make sure to re-apply blue Locktite as needed.

  9. #9
    KLF
    KLF is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    116
    Quote Originally Posted by Bike Whisperer View Post
    Rotor bolts are generally Torx T25, not Allen bolts.
    A little diversion - can anyone tell me why brake rotors universally use T25 bolts instead of a hex head?

  10. #10
    max_29
    Reputation: max_29's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    251
    Quote Originally Posted by KLF View Post
    A little diversion - can anyone tell me why brake rotors universally use T25 bolts instead of a hex head?
    to allow to apply a higher torque on a smaller bolt head

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: millertm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    461
    Well, went to the LBS and it cost $10 to change out both rotors. I went with it. I must say that the Ice Tech rotors are WAY BETTER. Brakes work very nice after the proper break in. I would love to see how the Saint's compair with the 4 piston setup. I am very happy I went for the proper rotors with these brakes.

    Mark
    2012 XXL Carve Expert

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    809
    I was going to say make sure you have a torque wrench as well, with todays lighter metal alloy's and carbon using the manufac torque ratings is important, also saves striping threads as well, over tightining is bad m-kay.
    Giant XTC 2 29er
    KHS Flagstaff 29er FS
    Neon Bow Trials Bike
    Norco Fluid 9.2 29er FS
    Norco BIGFOOT FATTY

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    707
    Having a LBS change rotors... using a torque wrench for it...

    Way to support your LBS, but really... a T25 key costs a fraction of that $10, it's one of the easiest jobs on a bike to do and I'd call the risk of overtightening rotor bolts with a hand operated key hypothetical. You'd ruin the bolt head before that happens.

    I also have never re-applied loctite and never had loose rotor bolts. Just tighten them up evenly. I had some cases of loose Centrelock rotors though, all in combination with adapters. From that I learned you notice a loose rotor allmost instantly, way before harm could be done.

    It's everyone's own call though.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    3
    Dremel.

    Had a stripped bolt. cut a notch and used a screw driver.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    2,827
    Quote Originally Posted by JeroenK View Post
    Having a LBS change rotors... using a torque wrench for it...

    Way to support your LBS, but really... a T25 key costs a fraction of that $10, it's one of the easiest jobs on a bike to do and I'd call the risk of overtightening rotor bolts with a hand operated key hypothetical. You'd ruin the bolt head before that happens.

    I also have never re-applied loctite and never had loose rotor bolts. Just tighten them up evenly. I had some cases of loose Centrelock rotors though, all in combination with adapters. From that I learned you notice a loose rotor allmost instantly, way before harm could be done.

    It's everyone's own call though.
    Avid even supplies cheapo keys with their brakes ...

  16. #16
    ballbuster
    Reputation: pimpbot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    12,490
    Just be sure to keep an eye on the tool. Once the edges start to wear, it becomes easy to slip, possibly ruining the star in the bolt head. Change out the torx key when it looks or feels worn.

    I also suggest getting some blue loctite for the threads. Those bolts see some heat cycling and vibration when you use the brakes, and the bolts sometimes back out. A dab of loctite on the threads means you don't have to crank them down super mega tight, and makes them easier to remove later... less likely to seize in the hub.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    1,377
    Use a $2.00 Torx 25 bit in a cordless drill that has a clutch. Use no clutch when removing the bolts. When you put the rotor back on, set the clutch at 3, then use a six point star pattern to get all the bolts snug and uniformly tight, then put the clutch on the 2nd highest setting and follow same six point star pattern to tighten them up. Power tools rock!

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    2,827
    Quote Originally Posted by PB Matrix View Post
    Use a $2.00 Torx 25 bit in a cordless drill that has a clutch. Use no clutch when removing the bolts. When you put the rotor back on, set the clutch at 3, then use a six point star pattern to get all the bolts snug and uniformly tight, then put the clutch on the 2nd highest setting and follow same six point star pattern to tighten them up. Power tools rock!
    What's the torque like at that setting? I've wanted to use my drill, but was worried it would go over board.

  19. #19
    ballbuster
    Reputation: pimpbot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    12,490

    I wouldn't

    Quote Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    What's the torque like at that setting? I've wanted to use my drill, but was worried it would go over board.
    Too much potential for a tool to slip and strip out a bolt.

    Plus, I like to tighten the bolts in a diagonal pattern. I get the bolts all seated, then torque them down.

    I think this is better to get a feel for this by hand.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    1,377
    Depends on the drill, but it will be tight enough. As for the bit slipping and stripping the bolt, not going to happen while using the clutch on the drill. Here is why. With the drill in both of your hands, you can get much more straight line pressure on the top of the bolt from your body's weight. There is no way to get as much top pressure on a "L" shaped hand tool, while using a single hand. Plus, using the drill is much faster and the clutch will provide a fairly consistent mechanical torque for all the bolts..

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    14
    Quote Originally Posted by fahza29er View Post
    I was going to say make sure you have a torque wrench as well, with todays lighter metal alloy's and carbon using the manufac torque ratings is important, also saves striping threads as well, over tightining is bad m-kay.
    I'm surprised no one mentioned this earlier. My Avid rotors have the torque specification stamped right on them, in letters every bit as large as the Avid logo! I think that's their way of saying it matters, a lot.

    Not sure what the consequence of overtightening would be... a predisposition toward warping?

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: literocola's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    570
    Quote Originally Posted by AZ.MTNS View Post
    Make sure to re-apply blue Locktite as needed.
    Rotor bolts come with locktite already applied, if reusing- locktite.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    690
    You guys make things too complicated.

    Remove bolts, replace rotor, tighten bolts finger tight,, snug down to a 1/4 grunt of torque in whatever pattern blows your skirt up, then move on with life. It should take ~2 minutes.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    30
    Quote Originally Posted by onebadwagon View Post
    you guys make things too complicated.

    Remove bolts, replace rotor, tighten bolts finger tight,, snug down to a 1/4 grunt of torque in whatever pattern blows your skirt up, then move on with life. It should take ~2 minutes.
    amen

  25. #25
    Rogue Exterminator
    Reputation: kjlued's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    3,889
    I have a German torque wrench.

    It has two settings, guten nuff and guten tight.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •