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  1. #1
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    Carbon parts: Torque setting

    I am finally getting a carbon bike part, a handle bar (I know, welcome to 1990). Anyway, I had a question regarding torque specs. Should I use the torque recommendation for the part that is being attached, ie: brakes, shifters, or is there a spec that comes with the bar? The reason that I am asking is that I read that Easton bars don't come with any numbers. I really don't want to destroy a new part. Any other recommendations would be greatly appreciated as well. Oh, I do have some carbon paste as well.

  2. #2
    Spice
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    Use the carbon paste, most bars seem to be in the region of 4 - 6 Nm from my experience- but all brands are different.
    Go by the values recommended for the bar- not the brake. If the brake has a higher max torque recomendation than the bar and you tighten it up to that, the bar would probably snap halfway through a ride. Nobody wants that to happen!

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the reply. Hopefully the bar comes with some specs.

  4. #4
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    My Ergon grips are attached tight enough not to move on my Easton bar. My brake levers and shifters are tight but can be moved with an impact. I've had 3-4 drops without any difficulty. I had to check and tighten several times over the first few hard rides.

  5. #5
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    When I first bought a Easton Carbon handlebar I sent Easton an e-mail asking them what torque to use. The reply was to use the torque as specified by the stem and other component manufacturer.

    If you could crush a carbon bar with torque in the region of 6-8 Nm. I wouldn't want to use it.

    Also, there is no need to use carbon paste unless you find that a component slips.
    The trouble with having an open mind is that people will insist on trying to put things in it.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronnie View Post
    When I first bought a Easton Carbon handlebar I sent Easton an e-mail asking them what torque to use. The reply was to use the torque as specified by the stem and other component manufacturer.

    If you could crush a carbon bar with torque in the region of 6-8 Nm. I wouldn't want to use it.

    Also, there is no need to use carbon paste unless you find that a component slips.
    I called Easton yesterday and got the same response. They did recommend using the carbon paste though.

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