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  1. #1
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    carbon or drop post on 29er hard tail?

    Do the merits that come from useing drop post out weigh the merits of the dampening properties of a carbon seat post on a hard tail? I don't ride alot of steep downhill but some technical trails.

  2. #2
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    I'm still at a loss to understand the belief that there are noticeable damping properties in a rigid tube that is linear compression. Any damping is essentially masked by the damping/flexibility of the seat itself, seat rails and tires. You could try an experiment. Ride your bike with the "best" carbon seat post. Then pump your tires 10psi. harder ride again and tell me that the ride isn't more harsh.
    The trouble with having an open mind is that people will insist on trying to put things in it.

  3. #3
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    The most damping is probably from a setback titanium post. But riding a HT limits its usefulness because you are off the seat for any truly bumpy sections. A FS bike is where you would stay seated more, but you have rear suspension for that.
    A dropper post gives you more flexibility to lean the bike and your body. Drop your seat an inch or so and see if you get some benefit. Mine is lower than how I would setup for road or flat riding

  4. #4
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    I personally avoid carbon posts on mountain bikes overall. Carbon posts are fantastically light, but at a pinch point (such as a seatpost clamp) thats the highest probability of a fracture of the carbon. Not an issue on the road, but a mountain bike gets repeated impacts, and a g-out as killed a number of posts (MBA even had this happen a couple of times during tests). A dropper post will add a pound, but gives the feeling of a more sure footed bike during cornering and downhills. Like someone else stated, a titanium post would do better for giving a bit of "plushness".

  5. #5
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    yes

    Quote Originally Posted by jiggerjake View Post
    Do the merits that come from useing drop post out weigh the merits of the dampening properties of a carbon seat post on a hard tail? I don't ride alot of steep downhill but some technical trails.
    The merit of using a dropper post for me is to get my @ss closer to the ground, which, IMO, is even more important on a hard tail than on a suspension bike, if you are riding steep terrain.
    Last edited by slip20; 11-23-2012 at 01:53 PM.

  6. #6
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    There's also carbon seatposts with designed in movement like the Cannondale Save and Syntace HiFlex. I have the C'dale Save post on my HT and like the bit of give from the post when I'm powering up a sustained bumpy uphill.

    I suppose one is for all around comfort (flexy carbon) and the other (dropper) is for performance on downhills.

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