Results 1 to 24 of 24
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    3

    New question here. Beginning MTB repair?

    Hey guys, I've had a 2012 Specialized Hardtail Sport Disk 29 for a few years now and I'm getting to the point where I'd like to start doing repairs for myself.

    I was wondering if anyone could point me towards a good resource -- either a book or website -- where I can read up on the basics of bike repair.

    Obviously I'm going to need some equipment/tools to start out. Is there a good all-in-one toolkit out there for MTB repair? Should I look into a bike stand like this one?

    In terms of what I'd like to repair, here are some examples:
    • A few spokes seem lose on my front wheel. There's quite a squeak that comes every few feet rolling. I'd like to learn how to true the wheel.
    • I've worn down the disc brakes and I'd like to learn how to replace and align both the front and rear brakes.
    • I'm thinking about upgrading to clipless pedals (I'm getting bucked a lot on the hard tail, and the security would be nice). I'd like to be able to easily swap pedals.

    So any ideas for this beginner?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: SpeshulEd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    42
    A good bike stand is handy to have if you want to start working on your bike.

    I went with this option...it's not a park tools, but its reasonably priced and sturdy:
    Amazon.com: RAD Cycle Products Pro Bicycle Adjustable Repair Stand: Sports & Outdoors

    I would say the best place for how-to's would be youtube. Arts Cyclery, Performance, Pinbike all have instructional videos plus countless others by random people. Watch a few, find the most helpful and follow along.

    Truing a wheel is fairly easy and doesn't require an expensive tool.

    I haven't messed with disc brakes yet, but they can't that difficult.

    And swapping pedals is a breeze...just remember righty-tighty doesn't not apply to pedals...turn them toward the front of the bike to tighten and away from the front to loosen.

    The only thing I would caution...wheels are important, if its anything that more than a wheel that needs truing, I'd take it to a shop. Spoke tension is important and it'd really suck to be cruising down a hill and have your front wheel collapse under you.
    Hey guys, lets go play bieks!

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    4,847
    I ride flats and there is a technique to doing it right. This video outlines the 'low heels' method. After a few rides you will never get bucked off. Instead a bump pushes you into the pedals.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    I ride flats and there is a technique to doing it right. This video outlines the 'low heels' method. After a few rides you will never get bucked off. Instead a bump pushes you into the pedals.

    That was a great video, thanks for sharing. Any more on flat pedal technique?

    While that's helpful, the terrain I'm riding is significantly more rocky than what's pictured. The problems I'm having are really me getting thrown off the seat I think. I'll pop off a huge rock and slip around in my pedals. I also have a hard time keeping my feet on/aligned with the pedals at high speeds.

    I'm not to the point where I can hit jumps; I usually just roll-over. Sometimes I hit the top of a jump and I'll get thrown off my seat and pedals for a split second. What's wrong with my technique?

  5. #5
    Crash Dummy In Training
    Reputation: PauLCa916's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    677
    Quote Originally Posted by mrscarface View Post

    I'm not to the point where I can hit jumps; I usually just roll-over. Sometimes I hit the top of a jump and I'll get thrown off my seat and pedals for a split second. What's wrong with my technique?
    Re Watch the video.
    Last edited by PauLCa916; 11-12-2013 at 03:40 PM.
    ​​
    2012 Stump Jumper Comp 29'er H.T.
    1997 Rock Hopper / Manitou TI Bulge Fork / Shimano STX-3 x 7 P.O.S.​

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    645
    For maintenance, check out the Park Tools website too. Has a ton of info for bike repair. I bought one of these tool kits. Although mine was branded as Sette, they look identical. Decent kit that should handle almost everything on your bike. The only thing's you might need to do that this kit can't is remove your fork race and headset cups (screwdrivers and rubber mallet work) and completely disassemble the rear hub. Pretty much everything else is able to be done with this kit.

    Titan Tool Kit - 21 Tools | Titan | Brand | www.PricePoint.com

    For a stand, I just used some 2x4's and a 4x4 post to make a stand that the seat sits on top of. I can clamp the seat tube to the 2x4 with basic clamps if needed, but most of the time, I just need something to get the bike up to my level and keep the wheels off the ground. I really like the amazon one though.

    Here's a link that includes my stand, among some others.
    My $30 Park Tool style workstand

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: SpeshulEd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    42

    Beginning MTB repair?

    I have that same tool kit rebranded. It's good for the money but not awesome. It will get you started though...especially when you don't know what tools you'll be using most often.

    I have purchased some beefier tools to replace some of the cheaper ones. For example, a good chain breaker goes along way and saves you a ton of frustration.
    Hey guys, lets go play bieks!

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by PauLCa916 View Post
    Re Watch the video.
    I just want to take a second and applaud PauLCa916 for providing perhaps the most insightful comment in this thread. I would have never thought to rewatch the aforementioned video. I'm ready to tackle the big ones now, thanks PauL!!

    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    For maintenance, check out the Park Tools website too. Has a ton of info for bike repair. I bought one of these tool kits. Although mine was branded as Sette, they look identical. Decent kit that should handle almost everything on your bike. The only thing's you might need to do that this kit can't is remove your fork race and headset cups (screwdrivers and rubber mallet work) and completely disassemble the rear hub. Pretty much everything else is able to be done with this kit.

    Titan Tool Kit - 21 Tools | Titan | Brand | www.PricePoint.com

    For a stand, I just used some 2x4's and a 4x4 post to make a stand that the seat sits on top of. I can clamp the seat tube to the 2x4 with basic clamps if needed, but most of the time, I just need something to get the bike up to my level and keep the wheels off the ground. I really like the amazon one though.

    Here's a link that includes my stand, among some others.
    My $30 Park Tool style workstand
    On a more sincere note, I appreciate the suggestion. If anyone else has recommendations for all-in-one bike tool kits, I'd love to hear them. Ideally something <$100

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ASiameseCat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    226
    Quote Originally Posted by mrscarface View Post
    I'm thinking about upgrading to clipless pedals (I'm getting bucked a lot on the hard tail, and the security would be nice). I'd like to be able to easily swap pedals.
    You could try buying some nice flat pedals along with some sticky rubber downhill shoes such as Five tens.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mitzikatzi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    1,811
    Where I live a "simple" bike service is $50 to $70. It doesn't take long to save money after spending a little on tools.

    The Park Big Blue book or Park Repair Help and Education are good places to start.

    Super B Deluxe Tool Kit I like these tools and this toolbox. Many threads on this topic. It is usually the advice to buy individual tools rather than a toolbox. I would buy mid range quality tool. I don't like really cheap tools.
    Duct tape iz like teh Force. It has a Lite side and a Dark side and it holdz the Universe together.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pablobell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    104
    If the trail is rough or you are going over a jump or big rollover, stand up.

    Also your weight should be back on the bike, you might need to lower your seat post.

  12. #12
    Plays with tools
    Reputation: customfab's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    4,200
    Park has a lot of great tech and how to info on their site. I'm always leary of the youtube crowd, never know how reliable the person is that's giving you advice. Most things on a bike can be done to a acceptable level fairly easily so it's a reasonable DIY project. Tools range from the basic to true professional quality (which are pretty hard to come by). I normally recommend staying away from tool kits though. If you're looking for basic tools they can be a cost effective way to buy them. But nobody makes the best of everything. With a kit it's easy to wind up with some stars and some duds but it all evens out. I normally only buy bike specific tools from bike tool companies. Bike tool companies don't normally make the best pliers, allens and open end wrenches. There are exceptions though, sometimes they will private label great tools but it's not the norm.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Pauldotcom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    740
    I know many appreciate Flats, but I for one would never ride them again after riding with clipless pedals. I recommend Shimano SPD style pedals: The 540's a reasonably priced ($40) but the 520's are also very good ($29)

    I bought a very nice stand I'm pretty happy with:
    Amazon.com: Park Tool PCS-10 Home Mechanic Repair Stand: Sports & Outdoors

    Tools: Park makes nice tools, but for some of the stuff, Pricepoint isn't half bad either.

    The most common tool I use is a hex Allen tool from park:
    Amazon.com: Park Tool Allen Wrench 4-5mm/T25 Y: Sports & Outdoors

    There are two sizes and they are great.

    A tool set like this is nice to start off with and about half the price a Park set would be:
    http://www.pricepoint.com/Brand/Sett...--41-Tools.axd

    Good luck, and I think your making the right decision on learning how to work on the bike yourself. There are going to be times on trail when things don't go right and with a better understanding of how your bike works, you will be better prepared.
    Paul
    “People fear death even more than pain. It's strange that they fear death. Life hurts a lot more than death." JM

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    113
    Quote Originally Posted by mrscarface View Post
    That was a great video, thanks for sharing. Any more on flat pedal technique?

    While that's helpful, the terrain I'm riding is significantly more rocky than what's pictured. The problems I'm having are really me getting thrown off the seat I think. I'll pop off a huge rock and slip around in my pedals. I also have a hard time keeping my feet on/aligned with the pedals at high speeds.

    I'm not to the point where I can hit jumps; I usually just roll-over. Sometimes I hit the top of a jump and I'll get thrown off my seat and pedals for a split second. What's wrong with my technique?
    Should not be sitting on your seat going over jumps, roll overs or through rock gardens.

    Buy it, read it 5 times and go practice.
    Mastering Mountain Bike Skills - 2nd Edition: Brian Lopes, Lee McCormack: 9780736083713: Amazon.com: Books

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    115
    The toolklits can be fairly expensive one time purchases. If you aren't up for that, buy as you go. That's what I've done. First was Allen Wrenches, Screw Drivers and Torx, that gets you what you need for a ton of stuff right there. Now I want to replace my rim breaks with disk breaks, 4th hand tool and cable cutters. I'd like some new pedals? Pedal wrench gets ordered with pedals. Time to mess with the drive train? Chain tool and cassette tool. It's worked out fine for me so far to handle it this way. Tomorrow sees me getting a repair stand (finally) which is great because Friday I should have a box full of components to switch from SS to 1x10.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pablobell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    104
    Be careful about getting a pedal wrench, I almost ordered one before I remembered my pedals can removed with a hex wrench.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    115
    ^In all cases it's worth making sure you have the RIGHT tool for the Job. Some pedals take, I believe 8mm or 10mm allens, while others take a box-type wrench. Likewise Cassette tools and BB tools come in many varieties. Make sure you get the right one. Same thing as buying a Flat head and realizing you should'a got a Torx. Right tool + Right Job = Win.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: peteer01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    589
    There's some tools, like a chain whip and cassette remover that you absolutely need, and others like hex wrenches that you probably already have. I would recommend buying what you need, as you need it. I'll also repeat the advice given to me by a wise man with a nice tool collection: "If you buy a cheap tool, you might feel good when you buy it, but regret it every time you use it. If you buy a nice tool, you might regret it when you buy it, but it'll feel good every time you use it."

    As for videos, I know they don't cover a lot of topics, but the five How To videos that they do have are some of my personal favorites as far as far as YouTube repair videos go:

    Tree Fort How To Videos - YouTube

    As for learning, if I don't feel I can do something myself, there's a great LBS near me, and the co-owner/repair guy allow me to watch, ask questions and learn from him when he works on my bike, and one of the friends I ride with is definitely more proficient and has more experience than I do, and is also a good guy to learn from.

    One thing that I really enjoyed was a purchase of the Sram X9 Drive Train Build Kit set from Pricepoint when they were having a crazy sale that made it less than $300. I figured that, worst case, trying and failing to install it properly myself would be highly educational. Getting everything on, and then tweaking until it was just right was a great experience and gave me more confidence and a better understanding of my bikes. My only regret is that if I had known it was going to work as well as it does, I would have put it on my primary bike instead of my older 26".

    The only other advice I have is read, read, read. There's a lot of good info out there if you're actively looking for it.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ghettocop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    1,353
    See if any LBS or REI hosts a "Park Tool School" in your area. It's a good class (8 hours) that covers all the basics with hands on instruction.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: OwenM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    58
    Youtube has been my friend, along with Google, which often leads to threads here and on other cycling forums about questions I have that have already been answered.

    I'll build or buy a real one at some point, but my improvised "bike stand" is cheap, and the height is fully adjustable. It only allows me to raise one end while the other is in a floor stand, but it doesn't take up any room, and has come in handy several times.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,393
    I would recommend the Park Tool Advance kit as it is pretty good quality. It costs more than the other kits mentioned but it will withstand repeated use. Amazon usually has the best price but right now it is listed a little high at $249 with free shipping. I have seen it for $208ish with free ship in the past. As far as stands go, Feedback makes a OK budget stand that I have seen go for as low as $115 shipped. Amazon currently has it for $149. I own that stand and do wish I would have spent more for something with a better clamp. To be perfectly honest though you don't need a full on repair stand for most maintenance. I started tooling with a floor stand like this and still pull it out before grabbing my repair stand just for the convenience factor. It sounds like a lot of upfront costs but if you go the cheap route you will still eventually spend close to the same in the long run and it will cause you some headaches. Just my $0.02. I bet you will find that the amount of time it takes to drop off your bike at the LBS is all it takes to do a quick tuneup on your own... it is very convenient doing everything yourself.
    Killing it with close inspection.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    115
    A quick second on a couple points by Peter:
    1) Cheap tools can make the job they were supposed to make easy miserable.
    2) Your LBS guy remains a great resource. Know them, respect them, buy from them, and get them lunch some time.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: hankscorpio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    757
    I'm still trying to figure out if the OP's name is Mr. Scarface or Mrs. Car face

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    115
    Quote Originally Posted by hankscorpio View Post
    I'm still trying to figure out if the OP's name is Mr. Scarface or Mrs. Car face
    Mrs. Car Face, clearly a woman who had a bad commuting experience.

Similar Threads

  1. We all start somewhere right? Well this is my beginning.
    By Robert Nutley in forum All Mountain
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 07-07-2013, 08:00 PM
  2. Beginner beginning again
    By smitham in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 04-17-2013, 01:03 PM
  3. Prophet 5 - A new beginning
    By JLampitt in forum Cannondale
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 03-17-2013, 07:08 AM
  4. Is this the beginning of a crack?
    By Tree in forum Santa Cruz
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 08-09-2012, 11:17 AM
  5. Beginning again :)
    By Catrin in forum Women's Lounge
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-16-2012, 09:40 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •