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  1. #1
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    Any thoughts on valve stems with removable cores?

    I'm currently building a set of Stan's Flows and I plan on using the yellow rim tape. I'm wondering if anyone has info regarding the valve with removable core. I have a few old valves from tubes and I know how to do this method. Just wondering if the removable valve cores offer much benefit? Does this just allow you to refill with sealant if needed? Basically, is it worth the extra cost?

  2. #2
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    I love it. I mount my tires up with a pump and no sealant then I remove the core and put the sealant in with the stans syringe. I know you can just pour sealant in with the tire 7/8 mounted and then mount the last 1/8th but I prefer to add the sealant afterwards in case its a hard to mount tire.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason R View Post
    Just wondering if the removable valve cores offer much benefit? Does this just allow you to refill with sealant if needed? Basically, is it worth the extra cost?
    Yes, it is worth it. It takes all the hassle out of adding sealant without having to re-seat the bead.
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  4. #4
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    Definitely. I use them and their syringe. Fast/simple/no mess. Makes top ups a piece of cake

  5. #5
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    I have them but never use them. I fill the Stans with the tire mostly mounted, but I do have a compressor so mounting is not really an issue. The syringe method has a couple drawbacks long term: (1) On refills, how do you know how much to add without breaking the bead? (2) In my AZ climate Stans boogers form readily and you gotta take those suckers out before you add new. Just my $.02

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  6. #6
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    They are cool for seating certain tyres. You take the core out then put the compressor on and it let much more air in..... as.far as for refilling its a.waste of time... like the other dude said.you gotta get out all.the bugers anyways and know hoq much to add.....

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by cpfitness View Post
    i love it. I mount my tires up with a pump and no sealant then i remove the core and put the sealant in with the stans syringe. I know you can just pour sealant in with the tire 7/8 mounted and then mount the last 1/8th but i prefer to add the sealant afterwards in case its a hard to mount tire.
    yes! ^
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by CCMTB View Post
    I have them but never use them. I fill the Stans with the tire mostly mounted, but I do have a compressor so mounting is not really an issue. The syringe method has a couple drawbacks long term: (1) On refills, how do you know how much to add without breaking the bead? (2) In my AZ climate Stans boogers form readily and you gotta take those suckers out before you add new. Just my $.02

    Sent from my mountain bike while crashing
    I'm new to mtb but I'm a clyde so I started with tubeless for the benefit of avoiding pinchflats. Flat protection is just an added bonus. Since I have WTB TCS rims and compatible tires, I don't actually NEED the sealant. I 'll only add more sealant if I start noticing some kind of diminished performance or air burping out. I don't really care about the flat protection. I'll just throw a tube in if needed.

  9. #9
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    I really like having removeable valve stem cores. Very convenient for adding sealant. However, if you use a lezyne pump that threads on to the valve stem, it can bring the valve core with it when you remove the pump. That led to a frustrating moment on the trail.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by ACree View Post
    I really like having removeable valve stem cores. Very convenient for adding sealant. However, if you use a lezyne pump that threads on to the valve stem, it can bring the valve core with it when you remove the pump. That led to a frustrating moment on the trail.
    Had that problem last week, it sucked but I also recall only putting the stem in by hand in haste. now i' have a spoke wrench in my bag that I can use to tighten down the core. the 11 gauge slot works perfect

  11. #11
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    Another vote for the removable valve core. Only because it helps seat stubborn tires. I've had situations where, even with an air compressor, I had to remove the valve core. It really allows much better air flow...and if you have one of the nifty stans syringes...you can add sealant without removing the seal. Certainly not mandatory but it's only benefited me and worth getting the tubeless valve stems to have it.

    I could be wrong but don't a lot of the newer high end inner tubes have a removable core? I thought I remember seeing them last time when I was buying road bike tubes.

  12. #12
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    I don't see the big deal with having them, when I need to add more sealant, I just break the bead and add it, takes a few minutes.
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  13. #13
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    Removable valve cores are great. You can seat tires VERY quickly with them, as opposed to a "normal" presta valve.

    Bontrager, Stans, Enve. With a removable valve core, never had a tire/rim combo I couldn't get to seat on the first attempt.

  14. #14
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    Not to mention if you're ever REALLY clumsy and bend the crap outta the valve stem you can just pop in a new one Of course I wouldn't know from personal experience...

  15. #15
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    WTB says to run sealant with your TCS

    Quote Originally Posted by cpfitness View Post
    I'm new to mtb but I'm a clyde so I started with tubeless for the benefit of avoiding pinchflats. Flat protection is just an added bonus. Since I have WTB TCS rims and compatible tires, I don't actually NEED the sealant. I 'll only add more sealant if I start noticing some kind of diminished performance or air burping out. I don't really care about the flat protection. I'll just throw a tube in if needed.
    According to WTB, TCS tires are specifically designed to be run with sealant. I'm surprised to hear that you've made it work without it. I've mounted several TCS tires and nearly all of them have had small leaks in the sidewall. Yes, I'm talking about brand new tires. Once I roll the sealant around, that takes care of it.
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Appendage View Post
    According to WTB, TCS tires are specifically designed to be run with sealant. I'm surprised to hear that you've made it work without it. I've mounted several TCS tires and nearly all of them have had small leaks in the sidewall. Yes, I'm talking about brand new tires. Once I roll the sealant around, that takes care of it.
    That is correct, however you only need a VERY SMALL amount of sealant to fully seal off the bead. you don't actually need 30-60 ml of sealant in there unless you want flat protection. When I first got the wheels, I did an experiment, I setup one with sealant and one completely without. IT was kinda like road bikes with a butyl tube vs. latex tube. The one with sealant didn't lose any pressure over the next couple of days. The one without sealant dropped significant pressure over the next couple of days and needed to be inflated.

  17. #17
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    You take the core out then put the compressor on and it let much more air in.

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