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  1. #1
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    Aluminum hardtail seatpost - carbon or alloy?

    Nearly finished building my Niner EMD9 and trying to decide which seatpost to go with, Carbon or Alloy. Keep reading that carbon will smooth the ride slightly, be slightly more compliant but local bike shops are suggesting it wont be noticeable and should stick with something like a Thomson Elite. Any experience out there to offer? I ride XC singletrack trails mainly, there's nothing too serious here.

  2. #2
    Life Is Short
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    I'd go with aluminum too, say a nice TruVativ $39 post, no need to get a Thomson

  3. #3
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    I agree, stay with Al.
    Can't go wrong with a Thompson.
    Perhaps look into a Ti railed saddle, I believe this has a greater impact on the ride than a carbon vs. Al post.

  4. #4
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    Go with a ti post. I will never ride a hardtail again without a ti post. It has an amazing ride quality, and you don't need to worry about crushing it.

  5. #5
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    Why not go full hatchet with this thing?

    Reality Redesigned: The GAUNTLET Ep8: Thomson to I-Beam Adapter - Pinkbike

    Seriously consider the carbon. or ti. In general they are going to feel better than aluminum, although there are exceptions to the rule, I am sure. On a hardtail on rough ground it is worth it.

    For example, I had an air9 and couldn't wait to get the thomson off. Easton carbon was significantly smoother, though not the best post.

  6. #6
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    Try a cheap used al on your rides. A high volume tire at low pressure and gel seat can also have an impact. The tire helps when you're off the seat. The length of your ride and conditioning have impacts. I use a 27.2 setback ti Moots and ti rail seat from years ago on my road bike. I need all that stuff plus gel trailrunners for the technical rocky rooty loop I'm trying to ride more. My next upgrade will be a frame with more rear compliance.
    Last edited by eb1888; 05-24-2012 at 05:04 AM.

  7. #7
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    I would go with the thomson. I dont trust carbon for seatpost duty and the ti is $$$. If you have the budget left for a ti post i would go ti.

  8. #8
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    how much do you guys sit on rocks and jumps? on my HT i am standing almost all the time, my carbon seatpost rarely gets any trauma. what's more the bontrager XXX is one of the lightest and has a 5 year warranty (and can usually be found in local bike shops, for around $100) love mine and saved me over 1/4 lb

  9. #9
    What day are we riding?
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    Seems like all my hardtails end up with a TI seatpost - and usually a setback version - along with TI railed saddles (WTB Rocket V). My butt and back likes this combo best after using AL, AL Setback, Carbon, Straight TI combined with a variety of saddles. I notice the difference between the different setups. You may not notice them on a short ride, but you will on longer rides.

  10. #10
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    Carbon

  11. #11
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    If aluminum, Thomson is the only choice. Want to really smooth out your ride? Go with a Ti post. No comparison to alu.
    If you're lucky enough to be in the mountains,
    you're lucky enough.

  12. #12
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    thanks for all the responses guys, to be honest I hadnt really thought about Ti so will explore options there.

  13. #13
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    Stick with a Tomson. Seat post diameter has more to do with it being compliant or not.
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

  14. #14
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    Check out the latest issue of VeloNews. They did a seatpost flex test. Carbon where more flexible then the alum versions. Thomson straight was the stiffest I think.

    I think even some carbon post where more flexible then the ti one they tested.

    I can pull out the mag and give details if needed.

  15. #15
    awesome
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    carbon, no brainer

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vortechcoupe View Post
    Check out the latest issue of VeloNews. They did a seatpost flex test. Carbon where more flexible then the alum versions. Thomson straight was the stiffest I think.

    I think even some carbon post where more flexible then the ti one they tested.

    I can pull out the mag and give details if needed.
    Id like to see some of those details. I was looking for a replacement post and have been told by more than one person that Ti is the way to go, but maybe it isnt?

  17. #17
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    I rode a carbon post for a while. At 230# it did have some flex if I was sitting and I hit a dip, but it was extremely comfortable. I went back to a Thomson and it's stiff, yes, but harsh.

    Ti is a good option, but ride does have a lot do with seat rail material, tire volume and your arse/sit bones.

  18. #18
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    http://velonews.competitor.com/files...90_VeloJun.jpg

    Interesting, based on reviews here on mtbr the moots post (and ti in general) is very compliant.

  19. #19
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    Wondering where this discussion is at based on the Velo News testing? Looking at the most compliant range of what they tested for the cost I'd be tempted to buy a Specialized FACT setback carbon post for my Santa Cruz Highball. Anyone have experience with a specialized carbon post?

  20. #20
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    Carbon seat post.

  21. #21
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    I waited and bid and waited some more and finally got a good condition used syntace ti off of ebay for around 70 bucks, my thompson has been in the parts bin since. The Ti rails on my wtb saddle also contribute to the overall comfort. Well worth it.
    If I was buying new, and I probably will at some point i'd definitely go for the Black Sheep or Seatposts | Kent Eriksen Cycles
    wherever you go, there you are

  22. #22
    some know me as mongo
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    yeah I feel that a carbon or ti seatpost really does make a big difference. I know that I will pretty much only ride carbon post (when I'm not using a dropper post) on my bike both on and off-road. they are lighter and can be more comfortable (it is possiable to make a super stiff carbon post). I have goos luck with the FSA k-force and SDG i-beam micro carbon post as well in the pass, actually still have the SDG post and saddle and its about 5 years old now.

  23. #23
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    I bought an Eriksen post a while ago for my N9. It does not turn a hardtail into a FS bike, but it certainly increases arse comfort on long rides...


    I'd like to see that Velonews test done with the current crop of carbon posts designed to improve comfort (Niner RDO, Syntace Hiflex, C'dale SAVE, etc)

  24. #24
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    On my experience all my Easton posts were smoothest among other good brands.

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