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  1. #1
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    700c tubeless tires on a 29er rim

    I saw something that said Zipp states that 28c tires on a 21mm rim is the most aero combo. Has anyone else seen that. Is that inner or outer dimensions? Which makes me wonder. Can you fit a tubeless 28c road tire on a standard 23mm 29er Mtb rim? Does this make sense?


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  2. #2
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    I have a 700x35 tire on a 19mm int. mtn bike rim with no issues. I only use it in a trainer though, it much shorter than a 29" mtn bike tire.
    I like to fart when I'm in front of you on a climb

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtrider76 View Post
    I have a 700x35 tire on a 19mm int. mtn bike rim with no issues. I only use it in a trainer though, it much shorter than a 29" mtn bike tire.
    Do you have it setup tubeless?


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  4. #4
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    No cause it's on a trainer but it would easily setup. No reason to waste sealant on a tire I use on my trainer.
    I like to fart when I'm in front of you on a climb

  5. #5
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    But could you? Would it work?


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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by davidnegreiro View Post
    But could you? Would it work?


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    700c = "29er".

    They are the same thing.

    The exact same bead seat diameter.

    Only variables are width, construction, and depth.

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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    700c = "29er".

    They are the same thing.

    The exact same bead seat diameter.

    Only variables are width, construction, and depth.

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    Thanks!


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  8. #8
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    That combo is going to be a challenging. Low and wide. Rule of thumb is 1.5 of rim width to tire width. So, 20 mm rim would need say a 30-32mm tire, at minimum. Bigger question is why? The 28 tire on a 23 mm rim is going to be so low that you would need way high psi to prevent rim dings. A 35-38 mm tire will work much better.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    That combo is going to be a challenging. Low and wide. Rule of thumb is 1.5 of rim width to tire width. So, 20 mm rim would need say a 30-32mm tire, at minimum. Bigger question is why? The 28 tire on a 23 mm rim is going to be so low that you would need way high psi to prevent rim dings. A 35-38 mm tire will work much better.
    If 28c is the new face of aero and tubeless are the future of road tires. I would be interested in Mtb, gravel, road compatibility.


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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by davidnegreiro View Post
    Has anyone else seen that. Is that inner or outer dimensions? Which makes me wonder.
    Mountain bike forum, bro.
    Quote Originally Posted by davidnegreiro View Post
    Can you fit a tubeless 28c road tire on a standard 23mm 29er Mtb rim?
    Yes
    Quote Originally Posted by davidnegreiro View Post
    Does this make sense?
    No
    Quote Originally Posted by pvd
    Time to stop believing the hype and start doing some science.
    29er Tire Weight Database

  11. #11
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    I run 28's on my road bike mounted on SRAM Rise 60's with a 21mm internal width, which are a 29er wheelset. They are great and I think a good width. It'd still be fine on a 23 Imo.

    I'm not sure I'd run 28's tubeless since with @75 psi, I'd worry about blowing them off the rim. I've asked a friend in the industry and he was skeptical that it was a good idea. Unlike mtb tubeless where you can really use any tire with any rim because of the low pressures, tubeless specific road rims have a different bead profile to lock the tubeless specific bead onto the rim. With a wider gravel tire, 35-45mm, and the corresponding lower pressures, there'd be less to worry about. But a 25mm road tire at say 95psi? Nope, I wouldn't try it.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harryman View Post
    I run 28's on my road bike mounted on SRAM Rise 60's with a 21mm internal width, which are a 29er wheelset. They are great and I think a good width. It'd still be fine on a 23 Imo.

    I'm not sure I'd run 28's tubeless since with @75 psi, I'd worry about blowing them off the rim. I've asked a friend in the industry and he was skeptical that it was a good idea. Unlike mtb tubeless where you can really use any tire with any rim because of the low pressures, tubeless specific road rims have a different bead profile to lock the tubeless specific bead onto the rim. With a wider gravel tire, 35-45mm, and the corresponding lower pressures, there'd be less to worry about. But a 25mm road tire at say 95psi? Nope, I wouldn't try it.
    Different bead profile. Bummer


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  13. #13
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    For road tubeless you need tubeless tires but not necessarily rims.
    Quote Originally Posted by pvd
    Time to stop believing the hype and start doing some science.
    29er Tire Weight Database

  14. #14
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    700c tubeless tires on a 29er rim

    Quote Originally Posted by dirtrider76 View Post
    I have a 700x35 tire on a 19mm int. mtn bike rim with no issues. I only use it in a trainer though, it much shorter than a 29" mtn bike tire.
    I did this as well. Id avoid tubeless however.
    Without having a tried and true setup you risk it blowing off the rim at high psi's. I've done this, it's messy. unless you have a dedicated tubeless tire i'd avoid. I'd even be skeptical without proper rim.

  15. #15
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    I have a set of Panaracer 700 x 48c mounted tubeless on some WTB i19 rims. I run them at 50 psi with Stan's and have never experienced any issues or problems. These are not tubeless tires.

    I have also run some Vittoria Evolution's tubeless with no problems on these rims and a set of Stan's Arches. Perhaps a combined 5,500 miles on the two sets.

    My only experience or difficulty with mounting some non-tubeless tires can be a little finicky on the set up, but I never experienced and problems at all.
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  16. #16
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    I've been running Schwalbe Durano Plus 28C tyres tubeless on Mavic 719 rims for a few years now. No major issues but I have damaged the bead on the rear where I've hit a pothole.

  17. #17
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    I've been running 23, 25 and 28 tires on 19mm and 19.5 IW rims on road bikes for years. I don't think another mm or two would make a big difference. Ran tubeless for a while but didn't like it as the tires were less supple and the tubeless setup was ~100gm heavier than non-tubeless tires and light tubes. I'm happy with tubes for road riding.
    Do the math.

  18. #18
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    There is some really old thinking in this thread...

    First of all 29er is 700C. Second of all, the rim width "rules" are marketing crap and anecdotal, seat of the pants pseudo-science with little to no evidence that supports any of it.

    I've been running 28c and 30c tires tubeless for a few years on 28mm external, 22mm internal "29er" Bontrager Duster rims with ZERO issues. I have been running Specialized Roubaix Pro 2Bliss since they were released anywhere from 20psi to 80psi. They were squirmy at 20psi (like a fatbike or any mountain tire at low pressure). They ride great anywhere from 40psi to 80psi which IIRC is the advertised inflation range.

    I have run a few different 28C tires and none were tubeless specifically and all rode great 60-85psi. Specialized All Condition Armadillo, Continental Ultra Gator Skins were a little rough riding because the sidewalls were very stiff but cornering was excellent.

    I'm also not a super light rider and I'm currently about 225lbs and I can be a masher. If you haven't personally tried it, keep your "rules" to yourself since people are actually making purchasing decisions on what they read here.

  19. #19
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    i have a spare 29 er wheelset and have set up a pair of 700 x 40 kenda happy medium pros. seal great but wont hold at 80 psi for more than a few hours. the first wheels a pair of easton havens i staned but again not an overnight solution. Yes this is a mountainbike forum and its for my pivot 429 when i urban ride in Sacramento along the river. the cycocross tires make that pivot when rebound locked into quite a machine. I'm trying them now with my otherwheelset a stans rim id about 22 mm. Besides the usual stans any suggestions other than go buy tubes?

  20. #20
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    80 psi in a 40mm tire???

    I'd run 40, if that.

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  21. #21
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    Many rims aren't rated for high pressures, it bears some investigation before attempting.
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  22. #22
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    Well this is why I rarely post on this site.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclopath1000 View Post
    Well this is why I rarely post on this site.


    Because you didn't get a cookie?
    Quote Originally Posted by me View Post
    Of all the paths you take in life, make sure that most of them are dirt.
    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    Gravel bike hate is imagined.
    Sweet.

  24. #24
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    Don't know the width of the rims off hand but I have a set of Bontrager RL 29ers and I've run 33s and 40s tubeless on them anywhere from 35-60psi. My mountain bike rims are about the same width and I run 2.3s on that. I also run road tubeless. Fulcrum Wheels with that are about the same width as my mountain stuff. Bontrager 26s, usually at 90-95psi. Everything is 622 and tubeless compatible. I'd run any of those tires on any of those rims and feel 100% confident.

  25. #25
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    I'm going to Stan's them and yes 80 psi is absolutely incredible on a mountain bike with the above. 40 psi is a rim cut. So I'll Stan's the stans rims and post results if it holds 80 psi over say four hours. I'm just going g for a night ride in the hood. Very unique ride. Don't intend to race it. But embankments etc on my pivot vs a cyclocross bike with drop bars. Yikes.

  26. #26
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    You'll find a pressure limitation on Stan's rims. I'm ok with pressures in the low 50's, but not much above that.
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  27. #27
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    That's why I had earlier first tried the Easton's. They are welded shut. But that holds for hours and not overnight. Just trying to advance the
    knowledge base. I'll def carry a pump poss co2 and a tube. But u dont ever want to flat where we ride.

  28. #28
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    If you wanna go tubeless, try and stick with tubeless rims. It makes the tubeless thing much easier.
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  29. #29
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    Dah ! That's what the rims are. They are tubeless specific rims and the tires are beaded and basically about the same bead as a tubeless specific tire. What's interesting is that the Stan's rim without Stan's is totally flat without any residual airpressure but the Easton which have been hanging four or more months has a bit of residual. That wheel has an off brand of sealant. I'm going to use real Stan's in both and see how many hours they will hold 80 psi.
    Then I need to map the leaks and perhaps try other sealants. I'm pretty sure I can get 80 psi for a reliable amount of time.

  30. #30
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    I believe Satn's rims has a max specified tire pressure of 45 psi.
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  31. #31
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    I have stans arch rims on my cross bike I run 55 front 65 rear no problem. Gorilla Tape and orange seal

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  32. #32
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    Three hours into inflation of both the Stan's rim and the haven rim the haven is rock hard but the Stan's rim is losing air. If this keeps up to morning I think I have my answer. They originally dod work well because I used a Stan's imitation.

  33. #33
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    Originally didn't.

  34. #34
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    I'm trying to post a overnight picture of the two wheels I mounted staned and inflated to 80 psi. The Easton havens kept the higher psi ie they leak at a slower rate than the stans rim. Both would work for a.couple hour ride.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 700c tubeless tires on a 29er rim-img_20170827_085434.jpg  


  35. #35
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    ^^^ And where's it leaking from
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