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  1. #1
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    2011 Trek HiFi Deluxe replacement bearing kit

    I have a 2011 Trek HiFi Deluxe that's developed a bit of play (slight movement is felt when you pull up on the saddle) in (what I believe is) the top tube pivot bearing.

    Below is one online dealer I could find with a replacement kit, but was wondering if anyone out there knows where I might be able to find a high-end (aftermarket) replacement kit (assuming one exists)? Maybe something with ceramic or carbonyte bearings and high-grade alloy casing that's strong and light, that goes beyond the original manufacturer's construction). Thanks ahead of time for any leads or suggestions.

    shockcraft.co.nz/bearings-bushings/suspension-bearings/suspension-bearing-kits/trek-bearing-kits
    Last edited by leo_s; 07-12-2017 at 10:09 AM. Reason: clarify original post

  2. #2
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    2011 Trek HiFi Deluxe replacement bearing kit-2010_2011_hifi_29.pdf

    Trek's tech doc with part numbers and torque specs, hope it's helpful.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by driver bob View Post

    Trek's tech doc with part numbers and torque specs, hope it's helpful.
    Thank you! But what I'm looking for (and I apologize for not clarifying this in my original post, which I will amend right after posting this) is a more high-end, aftermarket replacement kit (again, assuming there is one). Any leads on that (or a definitive "doesn't exist") is what I'm trying to ascertain. Thanks again.

  4. #4
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    The drawing does give bearing specs so you could go to any bearing supplier and talk to them about different grade bearings for upgrade.

    For example the main pivot bearing is 6903-2rs, google throws up ceramic options if you want to go that far: https://www.bearingscanada.com/S6190...SABEgKC7vD_BwE

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    Ah, interesting! Thanks a lot!

  6. #6
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    Your problem is more likely not the bearing itself, but a proper torque. You wouldn't use a ceramic bearing for pivot applications. Look at Enduro MAX bearings. They are specifically for pivot applications where the bearing does not see full rotation.
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cleared2land View Post
    Your problem is more likely not the bearing itself, but a proper torque. You wouldn't use a ceramic bearing for pivot applications. Look at Enduro MAX bearings. They are specifically for pivot applications where the bearing does not see full rotation.
    Thank you. Great resource.

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    Here was Enduro's response extremely helpful explanation:
    Your email was forwarded to me and I’ll be glad to help. Suspension pivot bearings are under a tremendous load and they only rotate a few degrees. Since they never even make a full rotation, any advantage of ceramics would be lost on them. I can only presume the benefit you are trying to achieve is to save a few grams. That could be accomplished by going with ceramics, but the you would actually be paying more money for WORSE performance and possible bearing failure.



    As mentioned before, the bearings only rotate a few degrees. This means maybe 3 or 4 ball bearings inside the cartridge bear the load. The “MAX” or “full complement” bearings we use in our bearing kits don’t use spacers/cages/retainers inside the cartridges to space the ball bearings apart. Instead, the cage is removed and extra ball bearings are packed inside the cartridge. This doubles the amount of ball bearings that are available to bear the load. They are the ideal bearing for the job. Where the MAX bearings are not available, we use all steel caged cartridge bearings. Ceramics would likely end up breaking prematurely.



    If you visit this page of our site: Gary Fisher Suspension Pivot Bearing Kits from RWC, you will find this listing:



    2010-2011 HIFI BEARING KIT...$43.00



    That is the kit you need. It includes 4 MAX bearings that include a black oxide anti-corrosion coating. There are also 4 flanged bearings that are all-steel caged cartridges.



    Both greases are very good for the application. The grease that is specified is not 100% reliable—it mostly depends upon when the bearing was manufactured. Once a grease is decided upon for a bearing type, they all get that grease. This continues until a better grease is found or grease that is just as effective but for a lower price.

  9. #9
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    That generation of HiFi and Superfly 100 commonly wear out shock bushings. The most often noticed symptom is movement when you pick up the bike by the saddle. It's a very cheap fix and the new bushing inserts are a piece of cake to replace compared to the old ones. You might look into that before you replace the bearings for the pivots.

  10. #10
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    ^^^ Good point, and even easier to determine where the slop is. Just place your fingers on the upper and lower shock mounts (at the DU Bushings) and gently lift by the seat to feel for bushing movement.
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cleared2land View Post
    ^^^ Good point, and even easier to determine where the slop is. Just place your fingers on the upper and lower shock mounts (at the DU Bushings) and gently lift by the seat to feel for bushing movement.
    I had this problem on my 2011 Superfly 100 and it turned out to be the bottom DU bushing of the Fox Float. The top bushing was fine but the bottom was oval. Easy and cheap to buy on EBay as Fox uses the same bushings for all ~2000-2012 rear shocks. Get the DP4 (red inside) versus DU bushing, come in pairs usually. I would also get the bushing tool instead of gerryrigging with a socket and jig

  12. #12
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    I would bet $100 on your answer. Had the same issue on '11 SF 100 and Rear shock bushing was the culprit. I bought replacement DB4 bushings before I saw the new inserts you can buy now.

    Quote Originally Posted by Andy13 View Post
    That generation of HiFi and Superfly 100 commonly wear out shock bushings. The most often noticed symptom is movement when you pick up the bike by the saddle. It's a very cheap fix and the new bushing inserts are a piece of cake to replace compared to the old ones. You might look into that before you replace the bearings for the pivots.

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