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  1. #1
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    Yeti SB4.5c VS Ibis Ripley LS

    Ok, so I'm looking to my next steed. My only options are these two bikes as this is what I can get for a deal, otherwise I'd include a few others. I currently ride an Ibis HD3 and I love it, but I realize that what I need is a trail bike. I've read the reviews on these and I see that they're both great rides, but I'm struggling to decide. I'm looking to a GX or XT build.

    What are your thought's on these two bikes?

    Yeti SB4.5c VS Ibis Ripley LS-2016_yeti_sb45c_profile_blk.jpg
    Yeti SB4.5c VS Ibis Ripley LS-new-ripley7.jpg
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  2. #2
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    Are you able to do a parking lot test of both? I think the biggest thing is going to be which geometry works better for you. Really both bikes are awesome and the builds are pretty equal depending one where your preferences fall.

  3. #3
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    I will preface that I haven't ridden a switch infinity.

    After owning a Yeti SB95c and Ibis Ripley, I'd vote Ibis all day long and twice on Sunday. Mainly because I think the DW link on the Ripley is hard to beat, threaded BB, choice of Boost or not and the SB95c's paint was terrible in regards to chipping. Kinda hard to swallow for the premium in price Yeti demands. Lastly, Ibis CS is among the best in the biz.

    It does come down to fit though. The Yeti is "longer and slacker"-er than the Ripley LS. From what I've read, the SB4.5c with the XC tune is a firmer setup and that echos how the SB95c felt to me. The Ripley was efficient, yet had great small bump compliance.

  4. #4
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    [QUOTE=phattruth;12444193]I can get for a deal, otherwise I'd include a few others.

    I'm also in the market for a nice trail bike, curious to know what other trail bikes you'd consider if you didn't have the connection you have.

  5. #5
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    I can't say that I've ridden either one so this may be wrong for me to say, but with all my experience with mechanical things, I just can't get over the switch system and where it's located.

    I could never buy one myself no matter how well it rode. Just looks like a crap catcher to me. I like how the Ripley has the hidden eccentrics- really clean.

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  6. #6
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    phattruth, what tires and wheels are you running on your HD3? I ask because I have different wheelsets for my HD3. They are only 2.3 lbs different in weight
    but the tires are faster rolling on the lighter set and spin and roll noticably faster for XC riding. The bike goes from am to xc.
    No need for a trail bike then, unless you just want one (like I did, lol)
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colin+M View Post
    I will preface that I haven't ridden a switch infinity.

    After owning a Yeti SB95c and Ibis Ripley, I'd vote Ibis all day long and twice on Sunday. Mainly because I think the DW link on the Ripley is hard to beat, threaded BB, choice of Boost or not and the SB95c's paint was terrible in regards to chipping. Kinda hard to swallow for the premium in price Yeti demands. Lastly, Ibis CS is among the best in the biz.

    It does come down to fit though. The Yeti is "longer and slacker"-er than the Ripley LS. From what I've read, the SB4.5c with the XC tune is a firmer setup and that echos how the SB95c felt to me. The Ripley was efficient, yet had great small bump compliance.
    It depends on what measurement you are looking at. For me to get the same fit on the Ripley LS as a Large 4.5, I have to size up to a XL on the Ripley and then the Ripley becomes longer then the Yeti with similiar fit. If you go with a black Yeti, there is no paint issue to be concerned with.

  8. #8
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    I'm referring to reach. I did end up getting a raw carbon 95c for that very reason.

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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colin+M View Post
    I'm referring to reach. I did end up getting a raw carbon 95c for that very reason.

    Sent from my D6708 using Tapatalk
    I got it. I'm also referring to reach, which makes me size up to a XL Ripley, where the L Yeti works for for me.

  10. #10
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    I'm with you. I had to size up on a Ripley as well. Ibis tends to be more conservative, even with the LS.

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  11. #11
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    I think you would probably be pretty dang happy with either.

  12. #12
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    Switch Infinity is the real deal, and I would guess the 4.5 is a great bike. However, I went ahead and bought the LS rather than the 4.5 for a number of reasons, including that the LS frame is $500? cheaper (FFS $3400 for a frame - you're having a laugh); the LS has a water bottle mount inside front triangle (which is important to me); threaded BB (becoming less of an issue now but still a factor); Ibis CS; Ibis quality vs. questionable Yeti quality with what seemed like an unusually high number of broken frames over the last couple years such as with the SB6; and this iteration of DW-L is every bit as good as SI.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by moefosho View Post
    I think you would probably be pretty dang happy with either.
    I'm quite sure this is true - sizing will make the biggest difference then details in parts spec.


    That said, if a mix of XT/GX/X1 is possible with good wheels and a solid fork (Fox34 Fit4 seems like the obvious answer if weight is a priority, Pike is the answer for burlier stuff), then it'll come down to small differences like water bottle storage, or value after substituting any seatpost/handlebar/stem/saddle/dropper lever type components.

    They're both really good frames, and for that style of riding the wheels/tires are going to make the difference between really good and truly great. If there's a difference in quality of wheelset the bike ships with, that alone would be enough to make that decision for me.

  14. #14
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    I would add the Pivot 429 T to the mix. Regardless of what deal you are getting, the Pivot frame is $800 less than the Yeti (You can get 10% off a Pivot through Competitive Cyclist and Active Junky to sweeten the deal).

    I have the LS, I really like the bike, but really, really wish the bottom bracket was higher.

    Most of the time the low bottom bracket works out fine on the LS, but when you are climbing really steep, technical climbs littered with rocks and ruts, there is no working around or finessing the low BB. There isn't.

    Otherwise, the LS kicks major ass. Best peddling and best climbing bike I have ever ridden.

    Its a great trail bike that you could probably race if you put some light weight 2.2's on it.

    Mine weighs 26.2lbs with a Fox 34, 1550g carbon wheel set, XX1 and a Reverb.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by blcman View Post
    phattruth, what tires and wheels are you running on your HD3? I ask because I have different wheelsets for my HD3. They are only 2.3 lbs different in weight
    but the tires are faster rolling on the lighter set and spin and roll noticably faster for XC riding. The bike goes from am to xc.
    No need for a trail bike then, unless you just want one (like I did, lol)
    I run a Schwalbe Hans Dampfe 2.3 up front and Nobby Nik 2.2 out back on Ibis 741's. I love the wide rims with this setup. Lots of traction.

    As for the cost of the Yeti 4.5c, yes it is more, but the look and feel of that bike is awesome. I like the Ibis too and I'm big on pedaling efficiency, so I'm torn. I've ridden both in the parking lot which doesn't do the bikes justice. I'm 6' and I'll be on a Large frame for either.

    Thank you to everyone for your input thus far.

    A couple other items of note is that I'll be running a 140mm fork on either one and the bikes will be setup for aggressive trail riding.
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigdrunk View Post
    Most of the time the low bottom bracket works out fine on the LS, but when you are climbing really steep, technical climbs littered with rocks and ruts, there is no working around or finessing the low BB.
    What's the best set up for minimizing pedal strikes? Run rear shock open all the time except when climbing, combined with a relatively tall rear tire, and climb seated whenever possible?
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by phattruth View Post
    A couple other items of note is that I'll be running a 140mm fork on either one and the bikes will be setup for aggressive trail riding.
    Will the Yeti/Ripley replace the HD3? Or are you keeping the HD3? You say you love the HD3 but now realize you need a trail bike, and are considering a Ripley LS with a 140mm fork for "aggressive trail riding." I haven't ridden the HD3, but are these two bikes all that different in purpose? What are you looking to get out of the new bike that the HD3 doesn't have?
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  18. #18
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    Weird to me that the BB is considered low on the LS. I'm coming off a longer travel bike on which pedal strikes were an issue but on same trails on the LS I just don't have that issue. While the static BB is reasonably low, the relative lack of travel means it does not ride super low.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by expatrider View Post
    Weird to me that the BB is considered low on the LS. I'm coming off a longer travel bike on which pedal strikes were an issue but on same trails on the LS I just don't have that issue. While the static BB is reasonably low, the relative lack of travel means it does not ride super low.
    12.8" with 5" of travel is low. Its the biggest reason I chose the Mach 429 Trail over the Ripley LS. Heck, my rigid Unit with 2.4" tires is 12.7".
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryder1 View Post
    Will the Yeti/Ripley replace the HD3? Or are you keeping the HD3? You say you love the HD3 but now realize you need a trail bike, and are considering a Ripley LS with a 140mm fork for "aggressive trail riding." I haven't ridden the HD3, but are these two bikes all that different in purpose? What are you looking to get out of the new bike that the HD3 doesn't have?
    The HD3 is a fantastic bike, but it's much more capable than I have the skills for. I am looking for a bike that is fun and I can push, but stops me before I ride over my head. I've watched a few too any of my friends get hurt lately trying to relive the younger years.
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryder1 View Post
    12.8" with 5" of travel is low. Its the biggest reason I chose the Mach 429 Trail over the Ripley LS. Heck, my rigid Unit with 2.4" tires is 12.7".
    BB height is a relative thing, and I don't think the LS is that low compared to a lot of longer travel bikes out there. Even comparing to the M429, I don't think the 5mm diff should present too many any issues with good technique/awareness of terrain.

  22. #22
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    It's kind of amazing to me that the company that delivered the Mojo has one of the ugliest trail bikes. That Yeti is just gorgeous. Call me dumb but I'd pay $500 more for those aesthetics.

    Also, I talked to Yeti and they rate the SB4.5c to support a 275 pound rider. That's the highest rider weight I've heard from a vendor for a FS. How does the Ripley compare?

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryder1 View Post
    What's the best set up for minimizing pedal strikes? Run rear shock open all the time except when climbing, combined with a relatively tall rear tire, and climb seated whenever possible?
    Shorter cranks, thinner pedals, taller forks, and yes turning up the LSC when climbing (until traction becomes a concern - free efficiency too) are all great answers to minimizing pedal strikes. Beefy rubber out back is always a good thing, but strangely pedaling out of the saddle tends to result in fewer pedal strikes for me.

    phat - pretty much any low slack 29er can meet that target, and that's why the good ones pile up accolades anytime they're handed to a journalist.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by phattruth View Post
    The HD3 is a fantastic bike, but it's much more capable than I have the skills for. I am looking for a bike that is fun and I can push, but stops me before I ride over my head. I've watched a few too any of my friends get hurt lately trying to relive the younger years.
    That's a good, honest answer. Being able to wring out your bike is always a blast no matter what bike you're on, yet bikes have gotten so capable recently. I just got a new, more capable bike and, after 100+ rides without a crash on a hard tail, I've recently had some close calls at high speeds. On the other hand, a Ripley LS w/a 140mm fork is a very capable bike in my book. Its gonna steamroll over a ton of stuff.
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    Quote Originally Posted by schnee View Post
    Call me dumb but I'd pay $500 more for those aesthetics.
    I'm 100% comfortable obliging that invitation.

  26. #26
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    I have spent some time in the sbc4 and own the hd3. I don't think the Sb4 or the Ripley will hold you back or reel you in from trying things over the HD3. Both of them are playful and fun to ride in their own right. If just rolling through everything is your desire and style is go for the Ripley. The Sbc rides a lot like the hd3 albeit with less travel. My point is I think you might be tempted to ride the same way on the Sbc as you are on the hd3 but with less forgiveness.

    For me the HD3 is about as perfect as bike that I can imagine. At least for me. I do ride agressive, especially for my age but is is such a versatile bike. My advice if you are having fun on it save some money, ride what you have, invest in some good protection and ride within your limits.
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  27. #27
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    I 'm also looking at the yeti and pivot 429cT but at 5' 7'', is getting a 29er the best idea. I haven't had a chance to ride on but they say the size small will fir fine. any advice?

  28. #28
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    Consider the Options

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    2016 Santa Cruz Hightower Carbon (Large) 135mm VPP suspension,
    140-150mm fork, 17.1in/435mm chainstay, Wheelbase 1180mm/46.46in, 67 degree HTA, 448mm/17.64in reach, 623mm TT length, Seat tube angle-74.3. (Can do 29 or 27.5+ wheels, can accept 2.8" tires) Releasing tomorrow...

    Ibis Ripley LS Carbon (Large)- 120mm DW suspension,
    120-140mm fork, 442mm/17.4in chain stay, Wheelbase 1167mm/44.29in, 67.5 HTA, 428mm/16.9in reach, 619mm/24.4 TT length, Seat angle- 73.

    Yeti SB4.5c Large - 114mm Switch Inf. Susp. - Fork is 140mm - Wheelbase 1180/46.45, and 67.4 HTA

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rev. 14 View Post
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    2016 Santa Cruz Hightower Carbon (Large) 135mm VPP suspension,
    140-150mm fork, 17.1in/435mm chainstay, Wheelbase 1180mm/46.46in, 67 degree HTA, 448mm/17.64in reach, 623mm TT length, Seat tube angle-74.3. (Can do 29 or 27.5+ wheels, can accept 2.8" tires) Releasing tomorrow...

    Ibis Ripley LS Carbon (Large)- 120mm DW suspension,
    120-140mm fork, 442mm/17.4in chain stay, Wheelbase 1167mm/44.29in, 67.5 HTA, 428mm/16.9in reach, 619mm/24.4 TT length, Seat angle- 73.

    Yeti SB4.5c Large - 114mm Switch Inf. Susp. - Fork is 140mm - Wheelbase 1180/46.45, and 67.4 HTA
    Funny, you were the one posting WB trumped everything, but now the longer wheelbase SC HT is a viable option compared to the Ripley?
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  30. #30
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    I think in terms of balance, the 2016 Stumpjumper 29er could be a contender for the sweet spot (large: 67.5 HA, 1172 WB, 435 reach, 437 rear center 135mm rear travel, 140mm fork).

    But the SC looks great, too.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vanguard View Post
    I think in terms of balance, the 2016 Stumpjumper 29er could be a contender for the sweet spot (large: 67.5 HA, 1172 WB, 435 reach, 437 rear center 135mm rear travel, 140mm fork).

    But the SC looks great, too.
    In the end it comes down to what you like better, to a point the numbers don't matter if you don't like the suspension.

    Personally, I liked VPP better than Specialized FSR, but still went looking for something in between.
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  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwoTone View Post
    Funny, you were the one posting WB trumped everything, but now the longer wheelbase SC HT is a viable option compared to the Ripley?
    I still stand by that, but to what I said, yes it is an option. I would agree with you that to a point numbers don't matter if you don't like the suspension or the fit. The new VPP rides so much improved from my 2012 Tallboy C. How can you make an issue out of 13mm? That is the only thing that separates it, other than that it is slacker and has what everyone seems to want, shorter CS. It's just an option.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rev. 14 View Post
    I still stand by that, but to what I said, yes it is an option. I would agree with you that to a point numbers don't matter if you don't like the suspension or the fit. The new VPP rides so much improved from my 2012 Tallboy C. How can you make an issue out of 13mm? That is the only thing that separates it, other than that it is slacker and has what everyone seems to want, shorter CS. It's just an option.
    I'm not, I demoed a TB LT, bought a TBc and thought the LT gave very little away in pedaling. While I'm no numbers expert, but you said in the other thread two bike with same WB and HA but different chainstay lengths wouldn't ride differently. Nothing could be further from the truth, so that does put into question your views on bikes.
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    Ron, I never said the the Hightower and Ripley LS would ride alike. I said the Hightower is an option to the Ripley LS. I asked you if 13mm is that big of deal. They are close but these differences can play a role in different ride characteristics: one is a bit slacker, one has bit shorter wheelbase, one has steeper seat tube, one can handle up to 2.8 tires. Saying all that, I'm not saying they would ride the same.

  35. #35
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    I demo'd the Ripley V1 and V2, and SB45c, and HD3 in various layouts. SB45c felt burlier than even my E29. Gave me a feel similar to my SB95 did in regards to making things easy (overkill on easier XC trails). I thought the HD3 was a good balance, comparing very closely to me E29, but didn't beat it on any grounds really. The Ripley V1 climbed like a monster, and wanted to go fast. The V2 with DPS felt more trail-tuned, more comfortable to cruise and flow on. Same 941 wheels, same Nobby Nic tires, just a diff fork and shock made all the difference. Gave the LS a parking lot spin, but it wasn't set up properly, so I can't give a detailed review, but I noticed a loss in stability at low speed. Actually just picked up a Ripley v1 with the original CTD shock, since I was after a bike that actually wanted to climb, and made it enjoyable (and it was clearance priced).

    They probably should've gave the SB45c more travel, but I guess they wanted to put it into the hotter short travel trail 29er category. It's almost Spartan in comparison to the Ripley. I don't doubt the Ripley LS is a fast bike. The west coast Ibis rep passed me and my riding buds two days ago on an epic ride with massive elevation and recaptured a lot of the KOMs. He was on some orange Ripley with the new routing, not sure if it was a LS or V2. There's only 2 chunky sections on the trail though, and was practically hero dirt (the loamy kind). Lopes showed how fast the original can go on EWS round, but even he said it wouldn't be his first choice. It's a matter of how burly you want the bike. A water bottle barely fits into the front triangle of a med Ripley, requiring a side load cage, but that was another plus in my eyes. That and it didn't feel like overkill on the easier XC trails, which keeps things interesting. Could probably trust the SB45c so much that you can ride some trails by moonlight, going by memory, and not feel like grabbing the brakes. IMO, there needs to be some challenge for fun, and taking out all the challenge leads to boredom and overconfidence, maybe encouraging some risky riding decisions.

    Not sure how your riding is compared to mine, but minimizing overlap is why I chose the V1 over various other options, to pair with my E29. The all-rounded nature of the E29 (and HD3), with a knack for descending fast, made me want something more complimentary, so a knack for climbing was essential. Also have time on a Following, Anthem X 29, Superfly 100/FS, Spider 29 Comp, ROS9... The ROS9 was the best of the bunch at complementing the E29, but hoping the Ripley V1 can take its spot and go even faster. Just waiting on a fresh new BB for it.

  36. #36
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    Ripley v1 turning out to be a barrel of fun with a 130mm fork. I think it's probably 68.5 HA and 72.5 SA like this, with a 2.3 tire up front and 2.2 in the rear. It's very playful. Very different to the SB45c. I would've considered dropping the travel on the SB45c's fork to 120-130 to get it to feel like this. The low BB took almost no time to get used to, but I did run a 165 crank on it like I did on my Following. Surprised the slack SA isn't causing issue for me, like it did on the Following. It's not as direct and solid feeling in the rock gardens, but letting off the brakes in more sections and trusting the bike makes it evident that it snakes through without drama, especially with a 36 fork and stout tire up front. It's not like a SB5c, let alone a 6c, in directness, accuracy, predictability, and solidity, but more like my Spec E29 in the surprising amount of stability in relation to the amount of stiff feeling. Guessing that's something a lightweight rider can get away with.

    Been enjoying it in corners, doing flashy moves, just because it can. Not the fastest, but who cares, especially if you're riding in a group and are forced to pace off the guy in front. Will have to play with sag a bit to see how I can attain the legendary no-bob out-of-the-saddle climbing traits I hear about, but regarding everything except climbing, it has exceeded my expectations. Honestly, I think I would've enjoyed the Yeti ASRc just as much, but it just wasn't on sale. The SB45c was such a good climber, it had me challenging stuff that looked impossible and getting up a fair bit on the first attempt. Ripley feels fast for its weight in the saddle, but I want to put out max power without feeling like much of it's going to waste.

    Overall, I'm really glad I started looking for a bike with a higher emphasis on climbing well, yet didn't hold me back on the downs. I've found that the better descending bikes didn't really do that much better, and that it was more of a tire choice, and learning the track and lines kind of thing. The trail itself has its own speed limits that the bike isn't really stretching. It just opens up more lines really. I also found that longer travel bikes didn't really climb that much worse than short travel XC ones. Finding the Ripley to be as much of a do-all as the Enduro 29, but I'm finding its limits much sooner, but I'm totally fine with that atm.

    I'd suggest a heavier and stronger rider check out the SB45c over the Ripley LS, or if a heavier rider was checking out the ASRc, I'd suggest to check out the Ripley LS instead. If I ran into a sweet enough SB45c deal, I'd likely jump on it to give it a longer term test and a better comparison. It has that much more potential over it. The testing grounds I demo'd it at were overly XC, with only a few fall-line style descents, which it surprisingly climbed up with satisfaction. The ASRc was more at home there, but finding those level of descents and climbs enough of a challenge to make things fun and interesting. I wouldn't regularly huck a Ripley or ASRc to flat off anything more than 2', which I did already a few times and I didn't like the sounds it made upon landing. Using a Lezyne Flow sideload and a Camelbak podium bottom, the shocks rebound knob can be hit and settings changed on a med Ripley, and still wearing a pack, so finding the bottle mount to not be so advantageous. I think a Hightower and Remedy 29 would be much much closer comparisons to the SB45c, while the Ripley LS is a closer comparison to the ASRc; no insult to the Ripley, just a lot of praise for the ASRc which might be underestimated greatly (even I underestimated the Ripley before I owned it).

  37. #37
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    Now that the Mojo 3 is out I think I have to include it in my list. Not a 29'er, but a pretty sweet ride regardless. I loved my original mojo.

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    Figured I'd bump this to see if more folks have actually gotten out and ridden both of these bikes. Hoping to get at least one of them demo'd next week when I'm down in Hurricane, but definitely looking closely at these two for the first plastic mtb purchase...

  39. #39
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    rode yeti, ibis and pivot at outer bike, great bikes but I preferred the yeti. Great compliance great climbing. It just felt good! Price is a little more though. And 1x is the only option up front. But just the feel alone makes it worth it.

  40. #40
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    I tried all three. SB4.5c, Ripley LS in L and XL, and 429T in XL. One thing that might make a difference is keep in mind there's no usable water bottle mount on the SB4.5c. Another big difference is sizing. If you're between sizes on the Ripley and 429T (which are almost the same geometry +/-1mm or so) then you're probably right in the sweet spot of Yeti's sizing, and vice versa, if you're between sizes on the Yeti, one of the DW's is probably perfect.

    Other than that, all three really ride superbly. I ended up with the Ripley LS in L (at 6'1") and love it. Two of my requirements were water bottle and not-boost, so that pretty much left the Ripley in this category. I also cross-shopped with the ASR-C, and while that's a good bike, the Ripley and the other bikes in this category are just FAR more capable and faster on the chunky downhill. I'm probably giving up 1.5lbs on frame weight to the ASR-C, but it's so much more enjoyable on trails like Mag 7, or the Lunch Loops (which is where I normally ride).

    The other note, buy the bike that fits the riding you normally do the most. The one that's going to make the riding you do 95% of the time, the most fun. That said, any of those 3 you're considering are super capable at both ends of the spectrum. Great bikes for traveling, where you'll never really feel you're over or under-gunned.
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    Right on, great info guys. I'm on a Yeti L now, and it fits me pretty good - I tried a M, and that was definitely too small and at 6'1", can't imagine i'd end up XL.

    Gonna have to try all three of those if possible, look like fun bikes. Hoping Yeti can fill an order if I pull the trigger - waited 2 months for the SB95c 3 summers ago, finally said screw it and got the aluminum version. Thus the resulting carbon envy and new bike purchase much sooner than expected...

  42. #42
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    Great point about the water bottle on the yeti DLd. I was so excited riding these new bikes that I did not consider this. However, on the ibis ripply there was a lot of pedal strike re: low BB. You might get use to this to avoid it but that is what put the yeti my # 1 choice.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by mprox View Post
    Great point about the water bottle on the yeti DLd. I was so excited riding these new bikes that I did not consider this. However, on the ibis ripply there was a lot of pedal strike re: low BB. You might get use to this to avoid it but that is what put the yeti my # 1 choice.
    I noticed the pedal strikes too. Especially in Moab. I ended up going with an MRP Stage at 140mm instead of the stock Fox 34 at 130mm and that got rid of the pedal strike issues, even on the same Moab trails. Since I want to use the bike for some of my races, the water bottle issue is a bigger deal for me than it may be for others. They're both excellent bikes.

    I would've been super happy riding the Yeti, but I've been really impressed with the Ripley, much more so once I got it set up for me, and I'm really happy with my choice.

    1st world problems. It's like having to make a choice between a Ferrari and a Lamborghini.
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  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by DLd View Post
    1st world problems. It's like having to make a choice between a Ferrari and a Lamborghini.
    Really nails it. A supercar without cupholders is the kind of problem people who can't afford one think is trivial, but somebody with the cash to gumball it will actually make a decision based on.

  45. #45
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    Something I wanted to point out that was addressed earlier by a couple folks was the Switch Infinity suspension. One poster said he would never buy the Yeti due to the system as he thought it was a "mud catcher". I cycle thru bikes frequently, sometimes too quickly, and had the SB5C wit the Switch Infinity system. I've had multiple Santa Cruz bikes with VPP, plus currently own the Pivot Mach 6 with the DW link & the 5010 with the new VPP. All I can say is (in my opinion):

    THE SWITCH INFINITY IS THE BEST SYSTEM....HANDS DOWN. The SB5C is thinly bike I have regretted selling and once it goes Boost with internal routing, I'll get another. Not because I'm a fan of Boost but the whole industry is going that direction and it will be best for re-sale down the road. The internal routing just plain looks better.

    I've had (3) different Tallboy 29ers and thought I was done with them for a while but admittedly, hadn't been on one of the slacker 29ers and wanted to try them out. I wasn't able to get out on a real ride but I went and checked out that 4.5C today and WOW, that thing is nice. I'm not knocking any other bike because they are all pretty nice but I know I wouldn't hesitate to jump on the 4.5...once I found a deal.
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  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by k2rider1964 View Post
    Something I wanted to point out that was addressed earlier by a couple folks was the Switch Infinity suspension. One poster said he would never buy the Yeti due to the system as he thought it was a "mud catcher". I cycle thru bikes frequently, sometimes too quickly, and had the SB5C wit the Switch Infinity system. I've had multiple Santa Cruz bikes with VPP, plus currently own the Pivot Mach 6 with the DW link & the 5010 with the new VPP. All I can say is (in my opinion):

    THE SWITCH INFINITY IS THE BEST SYSTEM....HANDS DOWN. The SB5C is thinly bike I have regretted selling and once it goes Boost with internal routing, I'll get another. Not because I'm a fan of Boost but the whole industry is going that direction and it will be best for re-sale down the road. The internal routing just plain looks better.

    I've had (3) different Tallboy 29ers and thought I was done with them for a while but admittedly, hadn't been on one of the slacker 29ers and wanted to try them out. I wasn't able to get out on a real ride but I went and checked out that 4.5C today and WOW, that thing is nice. I'm not knocking any other bike because they are all pretty nice but I know I wouldn't hesitate to jump on the 4.5...once I found a deal.
    Come ride out East, not in Dry San Diego, then talk to my concerns of it being a mud catcher. I've had enough bikes to have a pretty good idea of how much crap collects in that area on my rides. Great it works for you, but no way I'm paying for one. Didn't buy an Evil for the same reason.
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  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwoTone View Post
    Come ride out East, not in Dry San Diego, then talk to my concerns of it being a mud catcher. I've had enough bikes to have a pretty good idea of how much crap collects in that area on my rides. Great it works for you, but no way I'm paying for one. Didn't buy an Evil for the same reason.
    Regarding Mud catcher Worries:
    There are plenty of UK Yeti SI owners who post in the Yeti thread that have given factual reports that state that this is not an issue. Good for you that you don't care for the design but your statement is invalid because your assuming.

    Anyhow, The Ripley LS is a fantastic bike that I had the pleasure to ride for 16 miles and it would be a great choice. I happen to think the 4.5c is better though and I own one so maybe I'm biased but do yourself a favor and go Demo one In the MUD, snow, desert or whatever the elements or trails you ride on and see for yourself.
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  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwoTone View Post
    Come ride out East, not in Dry San Diego, then talk to my concerns of it being a mud catcher. I've had enough bikes to have a pretty good idea of how much crap collects in that area on my rides. Great it works for you, but no way I'm paying for one. Didn't buy an Evil for the same reason.
    Broke mine in on the North Umpqua Trail in Oregon where there was actually a small stream flowing down the trail in a couple places, numerous water crossings and plenty of loose, wet terra-firma. Plenty of opportunities for debris to collect. Trust me, it wasn't an issue.
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  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Varaxis View Post
    I demo'd the Ripley V1 and V2, and SB45c, and HD3 in various layouts. SB45c felt burlier than even my E29. Gave me a feel similar to my SB95 did in regards to making things easy (overkill on easier XC trails). I thought the HD3 was a good balance, comparing very closely to me E29, but didn't beat it on any grounds really. The Ripley V1 climbed like a monster, and wanted to go fast. The V2 with DPS felt more trail-tuned, more comfortable to cruise and flow on. Same 941 wheels, same Nobby Nic tires, just a diff fork and shock made all the difference. Gave the LS a parking lot spin, but it wasn't set up properly, so I can't give a detailed review, but I noticed a loss in stability at low speed. Actually just picked up a Ripley v1 with the original CTD shock, since I was after a bike that actually wanted to climb, and made it enjoyable (and it was clearance priced).

    They probably should've gave the SB45c more travel, but I guess they wanted to put it into the hotter short travel trail 29er category. It's almost Spartan in comparison to the Ripley. I don't doubt the Ripley LS is a fast bike. The west coast Ibis rep passed me and my riding buds two days ago on an epic ride with massive elevation and recaptured a lot of the KOMs. He was on some orange Ripley with the new routing, not sure if it was a LS or V2. There's only 2 chunky sections on the trail though, and was practically hero dirt (the loamy kind). Lopes showed how fast the original can go on EWS round, but even he said it wouldn't be his first choice. It's a matter of how burly you want the bike. A water bottle barely fits into the front triangle of a med Ripley, requiring a side load cage, but that was another plus in my eyes. That and it didn't feel like overkill on the easier XC trails, which keeps things interesting. Could probably trust the SB45c so much that you can ride some trails by moonlight, going by memory, and not feel like grabbing the brakes. IMO, there needs to be some challenge for fun, and taking out all the challenge leads to boredom and overconfidence, maybe encouraging some risky riding decisions.

    Not sure how your riding is compared to mine, but minimizing overlap is why I chose the V1 over various other options, to pair with my E29. The all-rounded nature of the E29 (and HD3), with a knack for descending fast, made me want something more complimentary, so a knack for climbing was essential. Also have time on a Following, Anthem X 29, Superfly 100/FS, Spider 29 Comp, ROS9... The ROS9 was the best of the bunch at complementing the E29, but hoping the Ripley V1 can take its spot and go even faster. Just waiting on a fresh new BB for it.
    Varaxis, what brand/model/travel fork were you running on each of these bikes?

  50. #50
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    Ive got the Ripley V1 and 4.5c..

    When I ride my Ripley, it feels like I did a line of cocaine before I hit the trail. The bike wants to go fast, you don't even try and it just flat out rockets up climbs and out of corners. Down side, It can feel a little sketchy at times when pointed down. For XC/trail riding that doesn't have a lot of descent, I haven't ridden a better bike. Especially if the trail is tight & twisty

    The Yeti SB4.5 feels great on the types of trails I like to ride (think northern utah) and the Infinity link is the real deal. Yeti did a great job with it!! It's an amazing suspension; small bump compliant, pedals great and climbs very well. It has the least amount of bob out of any VPP or DW link bike I've ridden. I thought the DW was untouchable until riding Yetis infinity, Its right on par with DW. The SB4.5 is insanely stiff and descending is definitely the Yetis top attribute; I never feel out of control, steering is stable and precise and it soaks up chunk and small 1-3 foot drops with ease. Its just a great "all around trail bike" and makes up where the Ripley V1 may lack. However, it isn't quite as fast on the flats and climbs as the Ripley V1 is.

    I've gotta sale the Ripley, because I cannot afford two bikes, but I'm gonna miss the hell out of this bike - a lot. When I say it was a bit sketchy, it was minor. I had a 130mm 34 up front and it was still a very solid bike on the descents. I did not need to change bikes, but I'm addicted and I ask that you pray for me.

    So far the best bikes I've ever ridden are the 429, thunderbolt, Czar, Ripley, and SB4.5. I would be 100% happy on any of these. I don't think any of them do anything dramatically better than the other.

  51. #51
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    ^^^^I agree with your feelings on the 4.5c as It's spot on. I also like you think the RM TB is just a fantastic bike that might be more fun than anything I've ever ridden except for the one true KOM SB5c
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  52. #52
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    Bump a old thread, how many of you guys still own the same bikes? if not what have you switched to? And why did you change?
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  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by sml-2727 View Post
    Bump a old thread, how many of you guys still own the same bikes? if not what have you switched to? And why did you change?
    I was one of the guys on the fence about the Yeti SI system back in 2014/15 when the SB5 and 6c were being released along with the SC Nomad Mk3. I had previous experiences with SC's single pivot and VPP system and evolution from the Tazmon, Blur LT1.0 AL, Blur LTc (2.0), & then a Nomad Mk3. Along the way I've seen and serviced the linkage and bearing systems and found that no system or platform is perfect. Forward to 2017 and I found that a 6.5" bike is way overkill for most trails and needs some extra oompf to get the best out of it. It basically straightens out most trails and while that has appeal, it's not as entertaining. I found a deal on a used 2016 SB4.5c and found that for most situations it's an awesome, efficient tool for piling on the mileage up and down. Not as stout for bombing the chunder but a lot more rewarding for choosing good lines and maintaining speed. I find that it's a good compliment to my Nomad and depending on the planned route as well as my mood - is the bike I probably grab 2/3s of the time.

    As for maintaining the SI system, regular inspection and greasing is important (as with any system) but I do think the SI is a bit higher on the greasing side (40hrs recommended). I also think there is more force applied to the bearings and very little actual rotation which leads to dry spots and premature bearing wear. The biggest enemy to the sliders and carriage assembly is lack of lubrication leading to bushing and stanchion wear. This can be done easily through the ports and grease is cheap but you have to use the right type. I found that most of the pain of greasing was cleaning the ports out before pumping in grease but I made some port covers out of a pair of screw thread protectors (white ones) and now that isn't an issue. Pull off the covers, pump a few strokes of HD Moly based grease, put the covers back on and I'm done in 5 minutes. The bearing only kits are inexpensive so I'll gladly perform a bearing change every 1-2 seasons for the life of the bike for the ride quality it offers. I'm keeping this one for a while!

    BTW - I'm 5'6" with a short inseam. I set up the Med frame with 170mm cranks, 100mm dropper paired with the 740mm bars and plenty comfortable.


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    Quote Originally Posted by sml-2727 View Post
    Bump a old thread, how many of you guys still own the same bikes? if not what have you switched to? And why did you change?
    It looks like you now have a Spot Mayhem in your lineup in lieu of what's talked about here. How do you like it and any comparisons to the Yeti SB4.5 SI setup?

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    Quote Originally Posted by sml-2727 View Post
    Bump a old thread, how many of you guys still own the same bikes? if not what have you switched to? And why did you change?
    Still on a Ripley LS & HD3 combo. For the LS, its been problem free. It rips on certain situations. Its nimble, climbs well out of the seat, and corners well(--while not pedaling). For some reason this is my best bike for bunny hoping. On a few trail jumps features I may have gotten higher than what 120mm of travel was intended for.

    My complaints would be BB height. I beat up my pedals.
    Also seat tube length/shape. I wish I could insert my 150mm droper deeper, but still have a shorter (modern) seat tube e.g. flush. When descending I would not might being able to get my butt a little lower. The current seat tube narrows/twists at the bottom, thus blocking full insertion.

    Besides climbing over rocks the low bottom bracket also comes into play while corning. Its bad for putting down power at a slight lean. I have to be more upright than other bikes I have. I feel like I loose some there. If you don't have to apply power out of turns it corners great. (if that makes sense).

    Not sure what I'd go to next. I wouldn't mind a slight travel bump and raise the bb a tad. I've been spoiled by the light weight, but I've been looking a little bit at the Evil wreckoning lately(yeah the big bike). Thats said to have a low bb, but its still higher than the ripley ls. No rush though.

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