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  1. #1
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    Why does 27.5" still dominate the market?

    My last two bikes have been 29ers and I am now looking into getting a new 29er. As I am looking for a new bike it really surprises me how many more models are offered in 27.5 than 29. Over the past several years 29 inch wheels have seemed to be the hottest topic in terms of wheel size and what I thought was seen as "the future". Also 29ers have been around for a long time now so I don't see it as still a transition phase.

    I know 29ers are definitely not for everyone and the right wheel size depends on a number of factors but with how popular 29ers are I am surprised with the limited options available.

    For example, if I am on pinkbike looking for trail bikes in 2016 and 2017 year models, 29ers are out numbered by 27.5 by more that 3 to 1 (304 29ers vs 1,091 27.5ers). https://www.pinkbike.com/buysell/lis...year=2017,2016

    Why is the bike industry not releasing more 29er options? Does it have to do with having to change frame geometry to work with the bigger tires?

  2. #2
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    I can only speak for myself. When I was looking for a replacement for my 26" bike, I wanted to like the 29" bikes out there. I demo'd the Pivot 429, Ibis Ripley and Camber. They were all slower (timed, not feel) on a technical climb I frequent. I got a 27.5 and have set PR's on it this summer.

  3. #3
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    The bike companies bet heavily on 650b, that's the supply that is in the pipeline. Never mind that they can't sell them.

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    The geometry that is taking over 29ers is still somewhat new. Just a couple of years. I think that in another couple of years you will see the trend shift to higher 29er sales as advantages and bike handling characteristics improve and people get back into the market for new bikes.

  5. #5
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    The market is flooded with everyone trying to get rid of their 27.5 bikes because they aren't what the marketing guru's said. 😉 Everyone is hanging on to their 29er cause they don't need anything else.
    Change begins by doing something different.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by life behind bars View Post
    The bike companies bet heavily on 650b, that's the supply that is in the pipeline. Never mind that they can't sell them.
    ^^^ this. Most consumers buy whatever's available, whatever's sold to them. We're the exception, not the rule.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbeadle View Post
    Why is the bike industry not releasing more 29er options? Does it have to do with having to change frame geometry to work with the bigger tires?
    650b is so common because it replaced 26 entirely in the space of about 1.5 years. It's important to remember that it has it's position because it cannibalised the existing market as brands replaced entire line ups with 650b versions of what they were selling the year before.

    29ers dominate the hardtail market, but suspension bike have been a bit more complicated. For a long time some very iffy logic was applied to 29er suspension bikes, making them all needlessly steep angled and shorter travel to make them 'feel like a 26er' when in actuallity they felt like crap.

    In the last couple of years demand for longer travel 29ers has grown steadily as the design of them has improved. I've certainly seen more demand for 140-170mm travel 29ers than any other type of mountain bike this year (but demand for gravel bikes is currently the highest overall, must be our british roads and weather). Much like hardtails it's going to take a few years because they aren't the incumbent design, but I think 29ers will become the norm across most travel ranges for MTB, especially with a 29er DH bike poised to take the World Cup this year.

  8. #8
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    I blame short people like me who hit their testicles on the top tube of a 29er every time they put their feet down on technical terrain or when they run out of skill.

    Happened to me last weekend when i was popping some wheelies on my friends trek fuel 29er on the parking lot and had to grab a handful of rear brake because some guy didn't see i was showing off and the TT met my balls.
    Last edited by Xaero; 08-06-2017 at 03:07 PM.

  9. #9
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    Probably many reasons 27.5 is still a strong contender or even dominating in some areas.

    Some shoppers get caught up in wheels size and some are just steered to the bike the LBS wants to sell, has many in stock or the right frame size. Others have friends counsel them or influence them based on what trails are in the area and how they ride.
    Still, others give all wheels a fair test ride and make a decision of how the bike fits them or feels.

    Add to that, a mix of the 27.5 Plus that has taken on a good rep by lots of recreational riders. These riders either don't believe there are big or important trade off's or don't care.
    Many have gone to Plus h/t favoring a good component mix and enough 'plush' to be happy while seriously undercutting a budget for a lightweight full sus.

    As for 27.5 / or plus detractors, Fast racing qualities and nimble handling are terms used often to rate bikes but that's only one specific type of riding or the competitive sport/nature of racing. Nimble handling might describe just a small percentage of trails in many riding areas that would demand that advantage if racing or ultra fast rides were the main consideration.

    Then there are some shoppers who got the wrong bike and might not end up liking the 27.5 (although it still counted as sales volume), yet others who like to have 3 - 5 or more bikes of various virtues and have many of the sizes available including a 27.5 , a plus or both.

    With some brands using wheel size as "right fit" , they've created a way to incorporate wheel size as a method of making it sound more sensible to customers, many that do have in-between sizing issues or special considerations.
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  10. #10
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    Goldilocks baby!!

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  11. #11
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    It has to do with the fact that you're looking on PB, simple as that. Check anywhere else and you'll find the scales a bit different compared to the young, energy drink swillin PB crowd, plus, most who have a good 29er are busy out riding them and don't want to sell them
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  12. #12
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    I think a lot of people just prefer the feel of a 27.5 over 29. I know I do. I know that my local bike shops sell a shit ton more 27.5 bikes for years now. It isn't a fluke. It's nice that we have a choice and no real reason to be hurt that 27.5 is more popular even though you prefer 29.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steezus View Post
    I think a lot of people just prefer the feel of a 27.5 over 29. I know I do. I know that my local bike shops sell a shit ton more 27.5 bikes for years now. It isn't a fluke. It's nice that we have a choice and no real reason to be hurt that 27.5 is more popular even though you prefer 29.
    Ding ding ding!

  14. #14
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    Where I live 29 has not caught on in a big way, although I feel with more AM 29ers coming out that will change a bit.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  15. #15
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    I have a 29er and a 27.5+
    The 29er handles everything the 275+ does. The 27.5+ will be gone shortly
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  16. #16
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    I think a lot of people just prefer the feel of a 29 over 27.5. I know I do. I know that my local bike shops sell a shit ton more 29 bikes for years now. It isn't a fluke. It's nice that we have a choice and no real reason to be hurt that 29 is more popular even though you prefer 27.5.

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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by kosmo View Post
    I think a lot of people just prefer the feel of a 29 over 27.5. I know I do. I know that my local bike shops sell a shit ton more 29 bikes for years now. It isn't a fluke. It's nice that we have a choice and no real reason to be hurt that 29 is more popular even though you prefer 27.5.

    I guess since facts aren't that important in today's world you can just make up whatever you want to believe.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steezus View Post
    I guess since facts aren't that important in today's world you can just make up whatever you want to believe.
    Wait... are you the pot or the kettle?
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus View Post
    Wait... are you the pot or the kettle?
    =s
    What bike store have you ever been in that doesn't have a lot more 27.5 bikes for sale than 29? Do you really think they stock the less popular wheel size so they can sit on stock or that they just can't seem to order enough 29's to meet demand after all these years?

    Don't believe me or what you see for yourself, simply go ask your bike shop what sells more.

  20. #20
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    Patiently waiting for the 27.75...
    Small ring in front makes it easier. Small ring in back makes it harder. That blows my mind.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steezus View Post
    What bike store have you ever been in that doesn't have a lot more 27.5 bikes for sale than 29? Do you really think they stock the less popular wheel size so they can sit on stock or that they just can't seem to order enough 29's to meet demand after all these years?

    Don't believe me or what you see for yourself, simply go ask your bike shop what sells more.
    There is a huge stockpile of 27.5" and now the hot new trend is 29er/27.5+.

    Industry data shows what is really going on.

    "Mountain bike shipments were down 12 percent overall, due to big drops of fat bike and 27.5 front-suspension and 27.5 full-suspension shipments."
    Supplier bike shipments up slightly in January | Bicycle Retailer and Industry News

    and

    "Only five categories posted growth in the quarter: e-bikes, commuter, 24-inch kids', BMX and 29er front-suspension. All other categories fell. Mountain bike and road unit shipments were each down about 18 percent."

    And that must have been a huge increase for 29ers HT's with the entire MTB cat down -18%.
    Supplier bike shipments fall 15 percent over first quarter | Bicycle Retailer and Industry News

    As for PB, 29ers hit the DH world hard at the beginning of the year and now you see PBers wanting to sell their outdated 27.5" for one of those new long travel, new school geo 29ers. You will continue to see 27.5" flood classifieds and on clearance whether used or new as people move to bikes that are versatile and can accommodate 29er/27.5+.
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  22. #22
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    E-bikes posted big gains, more than doubling last year's shipments, a gain of 1,113 units with 1,941 ebikes shipped. In January, more e-bikes shipped than in the 29er full-suspension, fatbike, cyclocross or performance woman's categories.
    E bikes were selling faster than 29 fs bikes in January...

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steezus View Post
    I guess since facts aren't that important in today's world you can just make up whatever you want to believe.
    True dat.

    Or just go with my LBS's sales figures.
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steezus View Post
    E bikes were selling faster than 29 fs bikes in January...
    Not necessarily. More e-bikes were shipped to dealers in January. That doesn't necessarily mean they were selling better that month. Maybe dealers were loading up on e-bikes in anticipation of spring/summer sales. And maybe they'd already received adequate stock of 29 FS bikes or would receive them in the following month(s).
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by azjonboy View Post
    I have a 29er and a 27.5+
    The 29er handles everything the 275+ does. The 27.5+ will be gone shortly
    What was the draw to get a 27.5 + in your case and what shortcomings or failed promises followed ?
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  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by steezus View Post
    e bikes were selling faster than 29 fs bikes in january...
    +

    lol
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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steezus View Post
    What bike store have you ever been in that doesn't have a lot more 27.5 bikes for sale than 29? Do you really think they stock the less popular wheel size so they can sit on stock or that they just can't seem to order enough 29's to meet demand after all these years?

    Don't believe me or what you see for yourself, simply go ask your bike shop what sells more.
    Where I live, there's barely anyone riding 27.5, everyone wants 29 here, been like that since the first 29ers came out. I can't even find tires for my 27.5 locally, there's just no demand, walls are lined with 29er tires, and there's some "performance" type tires stashed in a corner for 27.5, mostly for kid's bikes.

  28. #28
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    Talk about it. Seems the orange man or one of his minions has infiltrated MTBR

    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus View Post
    Wait... are you the pot or the kettle?
    =s
    Quote Originally Posted by Steezus View Post
    I guess since facts aren't that important in today's world you can just make up whatever you want to believe.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  29. #29
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    I think it is funny how emotionally invested some people are in wheel size. I've seen sales figures posted either here or PB and 29 is not even in the same realm, but 29 has been around so long that I doubt anyone has to worry about it going away anytime soon. It's just funny to see the excuses like why so many 27.5 bikes are in the classifieds or why most bike shops have way more 27.5 bikes in stock. It's a ****ing wheel size guys.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steezus View Post
    29 has been around so long that I doubt anyone has to worry about it going away anytime soon.
    Almost as long as 26?
    It's Deja Vu all over again.
    But I agree, 29 and 27.5 both are going to be dominant for a long time.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSU Alum View Post
    Almost as long as 26?
    It's Deja Vu all over again.
    But I agree, 29 and 27.5 both are going to be dominant for a long time.
    I do think that recent 29fs bikes are starting to use better geometry to make them more fun and they will see some growth because of that. I personally believe neither 27.5 or 29 will go away anytime soon.

  32. #32
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    Your question is based on a bad assumption.
    Quote Originally Posted by pvd
    Time to stop believing the hype and start doing some science.
    29er Tire Weight Database

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSU Alum View Post
    I can only speak for myself. When I was looking for a replacement for my 26" bike, I wanted to like the 29" bikes out there. I demo'd the Pivot 429, Ibis Ripley and Camber. They were all slower (timed, not feel) on a technical climb I frequent. I got a 27.5 and have set PR's on it this summer.
    I have no idea if 29ers will ever become dominant in the market overall, but the above comment is probably a factor. I LOVE my 29er, and I think it does most everything better, at least for my style of ridding, but low-speed technical climbing it does not.

    low-speed technical climbing is hard, and for most people I imagine it is the single most difficult and frustrating thing they experience when they go out for the twice a month saturday ride on the local singletrack. I think the casual rider is most likely going to pick a bike that helps the most with those conditions they find most challenging.

    A long, low, slack 29er with 150mm travel (such as I ride) is just not going to be nimble enough to be a good technical climber while piloted by your average recreational rider. Sure its going to be way more confidence inspiring at high speed, blast through rock gardens with reckless abandon, corner awesome, huck to whatever, plow up high speed technical climbs and even grind up a grade really well, but when Joe weekend mountain biker gets frustrated falling over sideways trying to stand-up pedal in his lowest gear up through that steep nasty rock garden he's probably going to think that a 27.5 wheeled bike with more conservative geometry is "better".

    he's going to be dragging brakes on the downhill sections anyways, so why would the faster 29er matter anyways?
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  34. #34
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    It's easier to design a bike around smaller wheels. Especially when a decent amount of travel is involved. I think my Riot is one of the best technical climbes I've riden. But most of the 9ers I tested were too long or squat to much when climing.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by euroford View Post
    I have no idea if 29ers will ever become dominant in the market overall, but the above comment is probably a factor. I LOVE my 29er, and I think it does most everything better, at least for my style of ridding, but low-speed technical climbing it does not.

    low-speed technical climbing is hard, and for most people I imagine it is the single most difficult and frustrating thing they experience when they go out for the twice a month saturday ride on the local singletrack. I think the casual rider is most likely going to pick a bike that helps the most with those conditions they find most challenging.

    A long, low, slack 29er with 150mm travel (such as I ride) is just not going to be nimble enough to be a good technical climber while piloted by your average recreational rider. Sure its going to be way more confidence inspiring at high speed, blast through rock gardens with reckless abandon, corner awesome, huck to whatever, plow up high speed technical climbs and even grind up a grade really well, but when Joe weekend mountain biker gets frustrated falling over sideways trying to stand-up pedal in his lowest gear up through that steep nasty rock garden he's probably going to think that a 27.5 wheeled bike with more conservative geometry is "better".

    he's going to be dragging brakes on the downhill sections anyways, so why would the faster 29er matter anyways?
    Curious what makes a smaller wheeled bike climb steep, nasty rock gardens better?

    I'm being genuine, not picking a fight. I don't know the answer so until I do, I may remain unconvinced. A long time ago I went directly from 26" wheels to 29" wheels; never ridden Goldilocks wheels. I believe my current 29" wheeled bikes climb at least as well as my old 26" wheeled bikes did, hence my question. Thanks.
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  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steezus View Post
    E bikes were selling faster than 29 fs bikes in January...
    You forgot to post this part of that same article:
    "Mountain bike shipments were down 12 percent overall, due to big drops of fat bike and 27.5 front-suspension and 27.5 full-suspension bikes."

    Fads usually die out after a couple of years, which is how long 27.5" has been around.

    Quote Originally Posted by Steezus View Post
    I've seen sales figures posted either here or PB and 29 is not even in the same realm,
    Please share these figures as I have yet to see anything official in 2017 that comes close to what you are saying.

    Also, XC is by far the broadest category in mountain biking, and what wheel size dominates the XC category? That's right, 29ers.

    And just a 30 second google search for best bikes in 2017 (seriously, first search result I clicked on): all 29ers/27.5+ except for four 27.5" bikes, two of which were women specific and another was entry level (which makes sense since it is easier "cost less" to design a 27.5" FS bike).

    So basically, for men (unless really short) the best bikes of 2017 are 29ers except for that ibis that is pushing the limits of the 27.5" size into the plus/29er realm and the entry level hawk hill which is a bike that has compromises to get to a price point, one of which is a smaller wheel size. Not looking too good for 27.5" huh?


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  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by euroford View Post
    I LOVE my 29er, and I think it does most everything better, at least for my style of ridding, but low-speed technical climbing it does not.
    This is the primary reason I went with 27.5. I also avoided plus for this same reason. Climbing technical single track is something I have to do a lot, and I hated how the 29er handled it. I also hated how the plus tires handled it. 27.5 was better but if I could have purchased a new 26 I would have gone with that.

  38. #38
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    You guys seem really angry. I have both wheel sizes and even at 6'2, both serve their purpose very well.
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  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by kpdemello View Post
    This is the primary reason I went with....
    You say you chose a bike you liked based on how it handled and rides on the type of terrain you ride ?

    How did you ever get invited to this party? You're supposed to tell us what bike, wheel size and color is the best for everyone no matter our size, style of riding, terrain or where we reside. Then support those claims with stats !!

    Your're probably out riding that thing now dammit.
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  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus View Post
    Curious what makes a smaller wheeled bike climb steep, nasty rock gardens better?

    I'm being genuine, not picking a fight. I don't know the answer so until I do, I may remain unconvinced. A long time ago I went directly from 26" wheels to 29" wheels; never ridden Goldilocks wheels. I believe my current 29" wheeled bikes climb at least as well as my old 26" wheeled bikes did, hence my question. Thanks.
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    The wheels roll over better, but most 29er bikes with a lot of travel are too long. To lift wheels with a little body english. It took me a while to find a 9er that did this well.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by euroford View Post
    I have no idea if 29ers will ever become dominant in the market overall, but the above comment is probably a factor. I LOVE my 29er, and I think it does most everything better, at least for my style of ridding, but low-speed technical climbing it does not.

    low-speed technical climbing is hard, and for most people I imagine it is the single most difficult and frustrating thing they experience when they go out for the twice a month saturday ride on the local singletrack. I think the casual rider is most likely going to pick a bike that helps the most with those conditions they find most challenging.

    A long, low, slack 29er with 150mm travel (such as I ride) is just not going to be nimble enough to be a good technical climber while piloted by your average recreational rider. Sure its going to be way more confidence inspiring at high speed, blast through rock gardens with reckless abandon, corner awesome, huck to whatever, plow up high speed technical climbs and even grind up a grade really well, but when Joe weekend mountain biker gets frustrated falling over sideways trying to stand-up pedal in his lowest gear up through that steep nasty rock garden he's probably going to think that a 27.5 wheeled bike with more conservative geometry is "better".

    he's going to be dragging brakes on the downhill sections anyways, so why would the faster 29er matter anyways?
    On the contrary, it's the average Joe that benefis from the long, low, slack 29er, as it makes most trails easier to ride and faster speeds safer.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cerberus75 View Post
    The wheels roll over better, but most 29er bikes with a lot of travel are too long. To lift wheels with a little body english. It took me a while to find a 9er that did this well.
    Yeah basically... a mid-travel 29er built for hauling butt is going to require more body english for that low-speed technical climbing than a similar bike with smaller wheels and a shorter wheelbase, not that it can't be done and in some cases the greater roll-over and traction can be a real help.

    My idea was that as a generality, in sofar as the mass market for trail bikes is concerned, your typical weekend warrior is probably going to lean more towards the bike that makes getting up that rock garden easier vs. the bike that plows down through the rock garden faster.

    hit Hall ranch on a Saturday. Your far more likely to see guys on say a Yeti SB5 trying to get up every bit of the rock garden, then later heading back down it dang near as slow as they can manage. the 27.5 bike is probably a good choice for that ridding style and situation.

    Vs. the way i do it on a 150mm 29er, i'll pedal up 85% of that rock garden, and where the bigger bike (and my talent) gets awkward, i'll jump off or dab and get over the feature, and carry on my way. WGAF if i no-dab clear the whole thing, i'm just earning my turns. On the way back down, i'll crack open the throttle and take full advantage of the gnar smashing performance inherent of the big wheels.

    different strokes for different folks. I think 27.5 will maintain a market share for your typical rider who isn't necessarily looking for a bike designed for outright speed, which is probably the biggest advantage of the 29" wheel size.

    Quote Originally Posted by mountainbiker24 View Post
    On the contrary, it's the average Joe that benefis from the long, low, slack 29er, as it makes most trails easier to ride and faster speeds safer.
    That may be true to a point, but i'm not sure it applies to the majority riders. i suppose i'm the average joe who sees those benefits, but i really DO want to go fast and spend at least 50% of my rides in the bike park. I think most riders think about any bike is fast enough when you point it down... they probably really want the bike thats faster pointed up.
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    I think the typical rider is looking for more speed going down. At least that is the industry trend with the new geo. People want to be faster than their buddies and look good on Youtube and Strava. How many riders are looking for a bike that is a bit slower with quicker handling? Not many posters around here, given my recent interactions in the 29er forum.

  44. #44
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    Agreed

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    I hate to spoil the party, but 26, 27.5, 29, it doesn't matter. In reality, the difference it makes for most riders (yes, even you) on a scale of 1-10 probably wouldn't even register. Ride whatever.
    Small ring in front makes it easier. Small ring in back makes it harder. That blows my mind.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lenny7 View Post
    I hate to spoil the party, but 26, 27.5, 29, it doesn't matter. In reality, the difference it makes for most riders (yes, even you) on a scale of 1-10 probably wouldn't even register. Ride whatever.
    QFT

    IMO...with all things being equal...the frame geo will probably make more of a difference than wheel size.

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by mountainbiker24 View Post
    I think the typical rider is looking for more speed going down. At least that is the industry trend with the new geo....
    I would argue that the 'new geo' is really more about control and stability while descending, of which greater speed can be an outcome.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenny7 View Post
    I hate to spoil the party, but 26, 27.5, 29, it doesn't matter. In reality, the difference it makes for most riders (yes, even you) on a scale of 1-10 probably wouldn't even register. Ride whatever.
    Yup.
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    As far as popularity goes, I guess it all depends on where you live & ride. as you can see by my signature, I own both sizes and will be getting another 27.5 here soon, a Pivot 5.5 to replace my V1 Mach 6. I think the TYPE of riding people do also effects what they ride and/or think is best.

    I'd be curious to see where people live that claim there are no 27.5 tires available or that 29ers are outselling 27.5 by a wide margin. Where I ride in SoCal (everything south of LA), I'd say 27.5 bikes make up 70% of the bikes I see. Those numbers seem to get skewed on the terrain as well. The chunkier and more difficult the terrain, the more 27.5 bikes I see.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steezus View Post
    I think it is funny how emotionally invested some people are in wheel size. I've seen sales figures posted either here or PB and 29 is not even in the same realm, but 29 has been around so long that I doubt anyone has to worry about it going away anytime soon. It's just funny to see the excuses like why so many 27.5 bikes are in the classifieds or why most bike shops have way more 27.5 bikes in stock. It's a ****ing wheel size guys.
    How can you say that is just a wheel size? Your wheel size is a clear reflection of you as a mountain biker, see step 23.

    https://www.pinkbike.com/video/397118/

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by singletrackmack View Post
    You forgot to post this part of that same article:
    "Mountain bike shipments were down 12 percent overall, due to big drops of fat bike and 27.5 front-suspension and 27.5 full-suspension bikes."

    Fads usually die out after a couple of years, which is how long 27.5" has been around.



    Please share these figures as I have yet to see anything official in 2017 that comes close to what you are saying.

    Also, XC is by far the broadest category in mountain biking, and what wheel size dominates the XC category? That's right, 29ers.

    And just a 30 second google search for best bikes in 2017 (seriously, first search result I clicked on): all 29ers/27.5+ except for four 27.5" bikes, two of which were women specific and another was entry level (which makes sense since it is easier "cost less" to design a 27.5" FS bike).

    So basically, for men (unless really short) the best bikes of 2017 are 29ers except for that ibis that is pushing the limits of the 27.5" size into the plus/29er realm and the entry level hawk hill which is a bike that has compromises to get to a price point, one of which is a smaller wheel size. Not looking too good for 27.5" huh?


    2017 Mountain Bike Editors’ Choice Winners | Bicycling
    Stats shouldn't be this difficult for some of you. Ultimately the argument is what is more popular. Both 29 and 27.5 bikes have dropped, but doesn't mean that 27.5 doesn't make the bulk of the sales.

    I haven't saved links to sales stats and don't care to see if I can find them again. I just know I have seen enough to not worry if I am right or wrong, I am correct in which size makes the bulk of sales.

    And your google search must be tailored to what you look at or something because I don't see the same thing you see when I type that in.

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    Quote Originally Posted by euroford View Post
    Yeah basically... a mid-travel 29er built for hauling butt is going to require more body english for that low-speed technical climbing than a similar bike with smaller wheels and a shorter wheelbase, not that it can't be done and in some cases the greater roll-over and traction can be a real help.

    My idea was that as a generality, in sofar as the mass market for trail bikes is concerned, your typical weekend warrior is probably going to lean more towards the bike that makes getting up that rock garden easier vs. the bike that plows down through the rock garden faster.

    hit Hall ranch on a Saturday. Your far more likely to see guys on say a Yeti SB5 trying to get up every bit of the rock garden, then later heading back down it dang near as slow as they can manage. the 27.5 bike is probably a good choice for that ridding style and situation.

    Vs. the way i do it on a 150mm 29er, i'll pedal up 85% of that rock garden, and where the bigger bike (and my talent) gets awkward, i'll jump off or dab and get over the feature, and carry on my way. WGAF if i no-dab clear the whole thing, i'm just earning my turns. On the way back down, i'll crack open the throttle and take full advantage of the gnar smashing performance inherent of the big wheels.

    different strokes for different folks. I think 27.5 will maintain a market share for your typical rider who isn't necessarily looking for a bike designed for outright speed, which is probably the biggest advantage of the 29" wheel size.



    That may be true to a point, but i'm not sure it applies to the majority riders. i suppose i'm the average joe who sees those benefits, but i really DO want to go fast and spend at least 50% of my rides in the bike park. I think most riders think about any bike is fast enough when you point it down... they probably really want the bike thats faster pointed up.
    This is why I bought a Riot. It's a great technical climber, great turning bike. Some complain it's not stable enough. Yeah, you might want to grab some brake if you're used to long and low. But you get used to it.

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    I've done a few 26" to 650b conversions, and the difference in wheel size was absolutely noticeable. It wasn't like I could ride things I couldn't on one wheelsize or the other, but there were different characteristics that benefited different applications. You can have fun on any wheelsize, but there are tangible differences, and it is worth considering when you are looking for a new bike.

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    I think everyone should have one of each.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stu Pidassle View Post
    How can you say that is just a wheel size? Your wheel size is a clear reflection of you as a mountain biker, see step 23.

    https://www.pinkbike.com/video/397118/
    Be a dick about it!
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  55. #55
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    Why is it so important to us to feel like we can get people to line up behind us? Wheel size doesn't matter. Nobody cares. Nobody's doing it wrong. If we all happened to meet out on the trail, we'd all just ride our bikes together and have a good time.

    We'd ride together. We would ask instead of tell. We'd make friends of one another.

    It's been fun stirring shit in this thread but in the end, nothing matters. You like 29" wheels? Buy a 29" bike. You like 27.5" wheels? Buy a 27.5" bike. Plus tires, flat pedals, hardtail vs FS, whatever. It's not up to somebody else. You choose. You buy it. You ride it. You love it.

    Let's have a beer.
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  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by k2rider1964 View Post
    As far as popularity goes, I guess it all depends on where you live & ride. as you can see by my signature, I own both sizes and will be getting another 27.5 here soon, a Pivot 5.5 to replace my V1 Mach 6. I think the TYPE of riding people do also effects what they ride and/or think is best.

    I'd be curious to see where people live that claim there are no 27.5 tires available or that 29ers are outselling 27.5 by a wide margin. Where I ride in SoCal (everything south of LA), I'd say 27.5 bikes make up 70% of the bikes I see. Those numbers seem to get skewed on the terrain as well. The chunkier and more difficult the terrain, the more 27.5 bikes I see.
    I agree it's somewhat regional, all this dancing around the size of tires here, there or everywhere. lol

    I was feeling bashful for not really being able to account for the biases or what dominates here in C Springs but now, I'm actually feeling more proud of being that oblivious to it.
    Telling people to just go out and ride, enjoying what they have rather than caring what others chose makes me feel I'm practicing what I preach.
    I don't always do that.

    Last edited by bachman1961; 08-08-2017 at 04:23 AM.
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  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stu Pidassle View Post
    How can you say that is just a wheel size? Your wheel size is a clear reflection of you as a mountain biker, see step 23.

    https://www.pinkbike.com/video/397118/
    Anyone on Step 23
    rather than Mile 23
    is a clear reflection of

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  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by RS VR6 View Post
    IMO...with all things being equal...the frame geo will probably make more of a difference than wheel size.
    Quote Originally Posted by Lenny7 View Post
    I hate to spoil the party, but 26, 27.5, 29, it doesn't matter. In reality, the difference it makes for most riders (yes, even you) on a scale of 1-10 probably wouldn't even register. Ride whatever.
    Definitely relevant points.

    In all the talk and challenges or claims of bike styles and wheel sizes or plus 27 /29 per what is "best", I haven't see anyone address the fact that these sometimes very minor variables are out paced by riders who care to practice and get better at riding their bikes and getting to flaunt the advantages while using skills or technique as a work-around for the minor shortcomings any bikes have.

    Beyond that, the bike choices based on the way one rides or the terrain they typically enjoy can easily direct them to the better or more logical choice if they know much of themselves in their bicycling endeavor or experience and that bike isn't necessarily the same bike for everyone even if it's the same trail system or terrain.

    I wonder what would happen if all these loud, flashy dictators of bike type got together to have a meeting and realized they weren't wearing the same pants, shirts and shoes ... ALL OUT WAR ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by k2rider1964 View Post
    As far as popularity goes, I guess it all depends on where you live & ride. as you can see by my signature, I own both sizes and will be getting another 27.5 here soon, a Pivot 5.5 to replace my V1 Mach 6. I think the TYPE of riding people do also effects what they ride and/or think is best.

    I'd be curious to see where people live that claim there are no 27.5 tires available or that 29ers are outselling 27.5 by a wide margin. Where I ride in SoCal (everything south of LA), I'd say 27.5 bikes make up 70% of the bikes I see. Those numbers seem to get skewed on the terrain as well. The chunkier and more difficult the terrain, the more 27.5 bikes I see.
    I live in Alta, Northern Norway, and people almost exclusively ride XC here, AM bikes make up maybe as much as 20-30% of MTBs here, and even for AM bikes here, it's almost exclusively 29".
    People look at my bike on the trails here, like I'm flying a spaceship, it's like a beefy AM bike is something they've never seen before.

    The cycling community here is quite weird, most of the more active riders here swap their dropper posts on their new bikes for rigid carbon posts to save some grams...
    In a coastal area where the mountains rise up from the sea to 600-1100 meters...

  60. #60
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    I think I want to ride with Sparticus! So between two bikes, I have 2-29 wheels, 3-27.5 wheels and one 26" wheel. And I have a ball with all of them!

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus View Post
    Why is it so important to us to feel like we can get people to line up behind us? Wheel size doesn't matter. Nobody cares. Nobody's doing it wrong. If we all happened to meet out on the trail, we'd all just ride our bikes together and have a good time.

    We'd ride together. We would ask instead of tell. We'd make friends of one another.

    It's been fun stirring shit in this thread but in the end, nothing matters. You like 29" wheels? Buy a 29" bike. You like 27.5" wheels? Buy a 27.5" bike. Plus tires, flat pedals, hardtail vs FS, whatever. It's not up to somebody else. You choose. You buy it. You ride it. You love it.

    Let's have a beer.
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    Haha, this is so true. If I ride with anyone. Nobody cares, unless you get a new bike...then everyone wants to try it.

    I prefer 29er my wife prefers 27.5. We never argue about wheel size, just everything else.

  62. #62
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    Any day now, the
    Let's see your 27.5 plus bike

    thread will add

    BEFORE YOU SELL IT !

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  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by k2rider1964 View Post
    As far as popularity goes, I guess it all depends on where you live & ride. as you can see by my signature, I own both sizes and will be getting another 27.5 here soon, a Pivot 5.5 to replace my V1 Mach 6. I think the TYPE of riding people do also effects what they ride and/or think is best.

    I'd be curious to see where people live that claim there are no 27.5 tires available or that 29ers are outselling 27.5 by a wide margin. Where I ride in SoCal (everything south of LA), I'd say 27.5 bikes make up 70% of the bikes I see. Those numbers seem to get skewed on the terrain as well. The chunkier and more difficult the terrain, the more 27.5 bikes I see.
    Pretty much like this for all of Socal. 150mm+ bikes are typically 27.5 but that's because you didn't have much choice in 29ers until fairly recently. Most people on the trails here are way overbiked and vastly underskilled though.

    I do see 29ers dominating the HT market though. But this market really goes through fads. A few years ago I saw a ton of fat tire bikes and now they are nowhere to be seen.
    Everyone is entitled to my opinion.

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghoti View Post
    Most people on the trails here are way overbiked and vastly underskilled though.
    ^this. Marketing guarantees enduro bikes ride faster and jump higher!

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    I see a lot of guys with LT bikes. The only way you need 180mm of travel around here is if you drop off your house. But hey, they seem to be happy.
    Small ring in front makes it easier. Small ring in back makes it harder. That blows my mind.

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus View Post
    Why is it so important to us to feel like we can get people to line up behind us? Wheel size doesn't matter. Nobody cares. Nobody's doing it wrong. If we all happened to meet out on the trail, we'd all just ride our bikes together and have a good time.

    We'd ride together. We would ask instead of tell. We'd make friends of one another.

    It's been fun stirring shit in this thread but in the end, nothing matters. You like 29" wheels? Buy a 29" bike. You like 27.5" wheels? Buy a 27.5" bike. Plus tires, flat pedals, hardtail vs FS, whatever. It's not up to somebody else. You choose. You buy it. You ride it. You love it.

    Let's have a beer.
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  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steezus View Post
    Stats shouldn't be this difficult for some of you. Ultimately the argument is what is more popular. Both 29 and 27.5 bikes have dropped, but doesn't mean that 27.5 doesn't make the bulk of the sales.

    I haven't saved links to sales stats and don't care to see if I can find them again. I just know I have seen enough to not worry if I am right or wrong, I am correct in which size makes the bulk of sales.

    And your google search must be tailored to what you look at or something because I don't see the same thing you see when I type that in.
    Not sure what is difficult about going to bicycleretailer.com, clicking on "studies and reports" and checking out what data they have for this year. Extremely simple, quick and easy to understand the data driven findings.

    As for the google search LMGTFY
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  68. #68
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    /dumbthread
    Quote Originally Posted by pvd
    Time to stop believing the hype and start doing some science.
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  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steezus View Post
    Stats shouldn't be this difficult for some of you. Ultimately the argument is what is more popular. Both 29 and 27.5 bikes have dropped, but doesn't mean that 27.5 doesn't make the bulk of the sales.

    I haven't saved links to sales stats and don't care to see if I can find them again. I just know I have seen enough to not worry if I am right or wrong, I am correct in which size makes the bulk of sales.

    And your google search must be tailored to what you look at or something because I don't see the same thing you see when I type that in.


    Quote Originally Posted by singletrackmack View Post
    Not sure what is difficult about going to bicycleretailer.com, clicking on "studies and reports" and checking out what data they have for this year. Extremely simple, quick and easy to understand the data driven findings.

    As for the google search LMGTFY

    Thankfully, any argument for what's popular, who sells the most of this or that type of bike in one region or 'nother and who spent more for advertising / marketing isn't going to define who is happy (or not) with what they are riding.

    As for where to find info or back up claims that are posted, it's good sportsmanship to include a link to the sources so any question of bias or validation speaks for itself.
    Quoting stats or 'facts' that are not cited with the source can be for a variety of reasons though . It was forgotten, the source has questionable integrity or obvious biases or the information is made up and there is no legit way to back it up.
    Certainly, the poster can hope or assume others take the information seriously but in reality, anything that can be cited as a source but isn't might as well/could be considered suspect.

    I understand those that are insecure with what they have or not liking their bike want to research and learn more about getting it right this time around but even then, sales volume or what's popular isn't a lock on getting the correct bike for them. IOW- Why Does It Matter ?
    There are a lot of good tactics to pursue and while this 'data' can be interesting and curious, it seems over represented in importance for the serious enthusiast shopping for the right bike.

    It (data/sales figures/wheel spec etc...) seems mostly to serve up idle chatter for those that have time and interest in discussion or debate.
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  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steezus View Post
    I think a lot of people just prefer the feel of a 27.5 over 29. I know I do. I know that my local bike shops sell a shit ton more 27.5 bikes for years now. It isn't a fluke. It's nice that we have a choice and no real reason to be hurt that 27.5 is more popular even though you prefer 29.
    Having owned both, I greatly prefer 27.5

  71. #71
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    To get the thread back to the original question:

    Quote Originally Posted by dbeadle View Post
    Why is the bike industry not releasing more 29er options? Does it have to do with having to change frame geometry to work with the bigger tires?
    Just do what Mack did above and google "best bikes of 2017" and you will quickly see that your assumptions about the industry not releasing more 29er options is way off. Also remember that pretty much any new bike that is a 27.5+ is also a 29er except for a few bikes. Same frame with maybe a change in fork travel that most likely can be adjusted.

    And on top of that, if you read thru the articles on PB you will see a ton of new 29er bikes that have been coming out since the beginning of the year. The classifieds show you what is going out of style.

    As for which size dominates the mtb industry, well as pointed out above, by far the most popular discipline in mountain biking is XC which is the domain of the 29er.

  72. #72
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    First i am a beginner, i have a 26 hardtail real narrow handlebars real fun 27 speeds it dates but light no discs, SWorks, i also have a 29 hardtail 21 pounds 11 speeds and i enjoy both. I find my 29 has some qualities and my 26 have others but i bought them used the 26 tires are worned so with similar tires and handlebars maybe the feel would be different? The old wins, 27 speeds for someone like me who enjoys climbing is just my kind of transmission, i am awaiting a smaller front ring to enjoy more my 29in.

  73. #73
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    I just wanted to say this is was a great read confirming nothing has changed.

    We miss you guys in the 26er forum.

  74. #74
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    There is a lot of conversation about sales. If you live where the bike parks are, your perception of sales are going to be that 27.5s make up more sales.

    If you live in areas dominated by trail bikes and XC bike tailored trails, you're likely to see more 29ers. 120/130mm travel 29er can handle everything a 140/150 27.5 can, its the rider that matters. There are vastly more people riding 29ers where I am at than 27.5. I find this to be true pretty much all the way up and down the east coast.

    Its become more of a niche over the past few years, but how many are on Single Speed 27.5s? As a matter-a-fact, we still don't see that many 27.5 singlespeeds on the market, and there's certainly more 29ers. How about another niche....pack bikes, still not many on 27.5. Yes the two biggest categories are Hardtail and Full Suspension, and among hardtails, more are 29er, and its easy to assume that its a 50/50 split with 29er and 27.5 FS.


    A Santa Cruz Bronson has the same wheelbase as the Santa Cruz Hightower......I know its not an absolute, and frame geometries and wheelbases change from bike to bike and brand to brand....and depending on what fork you have.

    In the end, the capabilities of the bike much more relies on the rider than the bike itself. The bike can help some or hold some back....sure, but the geometries of these new trail bikes are pretty damn dialed that they're going to perform far better than bikes 10yrs ago.
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  75. #75
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    Why do they dominate?

    Short people.
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  76. #76
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    there have been a few informal polls where I live and it seems that 29ers totally dominate the market in central Texas. so this question, like most discussions about bikes on the internet, is very region-specific.
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  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steezus View Post
    What bike store have you ever been in that doesn't have a lot more 27.5 bikes for sale than 29? Do you really think they stock the less popular wheel size so they can sit on stock or that they just can't seem to order enough 29's to meet demand after all these years?

    Don't believe me or what you see for yourself, simply go ask your bike shop what sells more.
    I'm a little late to this discussion. But come in my shop, you'll see more 29. They're much more popular than 27.5 (but 27.5+ is likely to become most popular, since they have similar roll over as 29, but with the advantage of the fatter tires). In fact, most of my manufacturers, when I look at leftover lists to see about bringing bikes in at discount, mostly have 27.5s leftover. Means they're selling through the 29s, but not the 27.5s, which suggests that in most areas the 29 must be more popular.

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    Quote Originally Posted by schnee View Post
    Why do they dominate?

    Short people.
    I'd go with Rene Herse?

  79. #79
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    The numbers have been posted here before. 29 isn't even close in sales numbers. Here in the Moab, GJ/Fruita, Denver area I've never been in a shop that wasn't loaded with 27.5 models.

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    The thread replies here dont surprise me a bit. I will say I would be willing to bet that some of these people have never even ridden a 27.5 bike to justify their answer (as to why they are so horrible in comparison that is)

  81. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zowie View Post
    I'd go with Rene Herse?
    Rabbit hole.
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  82. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steezus View Post
    The numbers have been posted here before. 29 isn't even close in sales numbers. Here in the Moab, GJ/Fruita, Denver area I've never been in a shop that wasn't loaded with 27.5 models.
    I rest my case. This proves it's a supply issue, not a demand issue. If those shops were loaded with 29ers, that's what the shop employees would sell. But no -- shop employees sell what's on their shop floor, that's what they're paid to do. Manufacturers are pushing 27.5" wheeled bikes because building them is easier and more importantly cheaper. Not because they perform better.
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  83. #83
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    Late to this party but here in the midwest 29ers still reign supreme. Thats most of what you see both on trails and in shops.

    27.5 you seen gain ground on younger/shorter riders.

    29" dominates races in numbers and ranks

    B+ is growing pretty fast. Some racers have b+ bikes for general, non-race/training screwing around. Of people I know and ride with regularly (i dont race) there are a few b+ which I am one of them. I know there are a few more around and every big gathering someone else I know has either switched or simply added a plus bike. Those without plus bikes more often than not have a fat bike along with their 29er.

    I rode 29er for about 4 years. Got a fat bike, 29er only came out on groups rides that i would be the only fatty, so i wasnt way behind. 29+ imho sucks, like riding my fat bike with same sluggish steering just a bit better in the tight and twisty. Tried b+ hardtail on 3.0s and not even my fat bike makes me smile that much.

    Each has its place. When it comes to being just feather light and flat out fast, 29er is hard to beat. When you want stiff, more responsive, just a balance between speed, traction, comfort and general playfulness b+ is hard to beat.

    Its more just an "to each their own".

    As for why 27.5 is so prevalent, manufacturers, not riders.

    Trek is still way behind that curve. Most bikes are 29 except for smaller sizes. Their just now getting into the b+ game, likely because b+ is proving a higher demand. 27.5 x 3.0 is within couple mm of a 29 x 2.4 tire. Only a few mm smaller diameter than my big 26 x 4.7s on my fat bike which was about the exact same as my 29er on higher volume/taller of 2.4 tires.

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  84. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by RAKC Ind View Post
    29" dominates races in numbers and ranks
    This explains the midwest. When you say racing, you are talking about XC racing. When my friends here (Vancouver Island) say racing, it is Enduro racing. I see the trend is starting towards more 29, now that more capable ones are being made.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steezus View Post
    The numbers have been posted here before. 29 isn't even close in sales numbers. Here in the Moab, GJ/Fruita, Denver area I've never been in a shop that wasn't loaded with 27.5 models.
    So you've been going to bike shops for... three years now?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus View Post
    I rest my case. This proves it's a supply issue, not a demand issue. If those shops were loaded with 29ers, that's what the shop employees would sell. But no -- shop employees sell what's on their shop floor, that's what they're paid to do. Manufacturers are pushing 27.5" wheeled bikes because building them is easier and more importantly cheaper. Not because they perform better.
    =sParty
    29 geometry is finally catching up a bit. It's pretty crazy to claim that 29 has been a great all around bike for things other than XC until recently. It's not sales talk, it is reality and the reason most people opt for 27.5. We'll see what happens in the future, but I kind of doubt 29 will reign supreme as lots of folks still enjoy more lively riding than what the 29 wheel size will ever offer. I personally don't want to just roll super easy over everything while having less responsive wheels. For me 29 would be my second bike if I had one, but I want a great all around bike since I only get to have one.

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    Maybe it"s the rat race. Most people are busy and do not ride that much. The little time they spend riding they want to enjoy it. Staying with a habit is just easier than learning, adapting. Since they were new on the market not that long ago manufacturers only offered a few 29 to test the market. It took 3-4 decades for largely funded campaigns for less smoking,, less drunk driving,, in 15-25 years maybe shorter/lighter riders will be mostly on 27 and taller/heavier riders will be on 29??

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    That trend of wheel size to rider size is already out there kind of strong.

    Im 6'1 285lbs and 29er isnt my thing.

    One thing I know is helping 29ers is rims are moving to wider. Old school skinny rims added to the geometry lacking. Too flexy. Rims becoming wider and stiffer is helping a lot.

    And ya, its XC out here. There are occasions where other types of riding are available but rare.

    Hell there is always at least a couple fat bikes racing though. One guy Im not sure if he was cat 1 or 2 at the last race (they started together due to weather delay) racing on a bucksaw! Definitely wasnt last.

    1x drivetrains have taken over. See some with full eagle but every rider says its pointless here, they have it cause they go out west to ride a few times a year.

    Thats the one thing that I doubt will ever change is 29ers being dominate here. Trails are mellow compared to out west, racing is pretty much all some level of XC.

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  89. #89
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    Three weeks and no correct answer?

    Of all of the wheel sizes that manufactures are currently prepared to offer buyers, 27.5 is the closest to the most fun size you can get, which is 26 :0)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    Three weeks and no correct answer?

    Of all of the wheel sizes that manufactures are currently prepared to offer buyers, 27.5 is the closest to the most fun size you can get, which is 26 :0)
    Nope, 26+ is the most fun size!

    I just have to jump into a wheel size debate ever once in a while!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    Nope, 26+ is the most fun size!

    I just have to jump into a wheel size debate ever once in a while!

    29+, 27.5++ , or 26+++ is fun too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by endo_alley View Post
    29+, 27.5++ , or 26+++ is fun too.
    But they're not the funnest!


    *As I get my 29er prepped for a ride.

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    they're the funniest

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    Quote Originally Posted by endo_alley View Post
    they're the funniest
    29er is a clown bike size.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    29er is a clown bike size.
    You just say that because you can't throw a leg over one.

  96. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    29er is a clown bike size.
    Everyone knows clown bikes have tiny wheels.


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    I think it's a fair point when mentioned earlier about store stock.
    Many customers can be coached into a type or style of bike by "the experts" and would naturally be leery of bikes that only represent a small percentage of what appears to be the mainstream or 'normal' bikes taking up 85% of the sales floor.

    To me, the big fuss about wheel sizes and types probably fits into two factions.
    Those trying to find or prove some absolute BEST and those trying to justify the bike they got as the right one for everybody. To the first; We know there are trade offs and compromises so BEST exists in one's mindset or a very specific set of standards for the type of riding and the bike pilot.
    Best at accelerating?
    downhill?
    roll-over?
    tight, twisty trails?
    Low c'g?
    high bb ?
    navigating rock gardens? .... on and on.

    As for the second faction;
    I have no idea how any one bike or wheel can be best for everyone but I suspect their self esteem is linked to "being right" even though right for Billy Bob isn't necessarily right for Jethro and, those folks just don't get it. They'll continue to wear their insecurity on their shirt-sleeve and have endless well-rehearsed speeches about THIS bike or THAT bike or what they ride AND YOU SHOULD TOO !

    Thankfully, there are a number of level-headed people that know bikes are an extension of personality, performance, or recreation that fit into a budget or even competition parameters that are very unique. They know telling other's what they should be on is like guessing their favorite jelly bean.

    And even if correctly guessing red, is it cherry, cinnamon or strawberry ?
    Last edited by bachman1961; 3 Weeks Ago at 06:19 AM.
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    For me, any pride or "mine is better" comes from hoping the 29er isn't the next 26. Where good wheelsets and tires are phased out and hard to find. Other than that, I could care less what people ride.
    Small ring in front makes it easier. Small ring in back makes it harder. That blows my mind.

  99. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steezus View Post
    29 geometry is finally catching up a bit. It's pretty crazy to claim that 29 has been a great all around bike for things other than XC until recently. It's not sales talk, it is reality and the reason most people opt for 27.5. We'll see what happens in the future, but I kind of doubt 29 will reign supreme as lots of folks still enjoy more lively riding than what the 29 wheel size will ever offer. I personally don't want to just roll super easy over everything while having less responsive wheels. For me 29 would be my second bike if I had one, but I want a great all around bike since I only get to have one.
    It's cool that we have options. That we each get to ride whatever we think is best. At 6'2" tall and having ridden all three common wheel sizes (since 1985), I much prefer the fit and riding characteristics of a 29" wheeled bike. But I get that others may prefer 27.5" or even 26" wheels.

    I've always had a ton o' fun on every mountain bike I've ever owned, and there have been dozens. For many years I'd buy a new bike thinking, "This is the last mountain bike I'll ever buy!" Ha! Now whenever I shell out a few thousand bucks for a new bike, I wonder how long I'll have it and what my next bike will be like.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lenny7 View Post
    For me, any pride or "mine is better" comes from hoping the 29er isn't the next 26. Where good wheelsets and tires are phased out and hard to find. Other than that, I could care less what people ride.
    What I have learned lately is that for success in life you have to come right out and tell the other guy who disagrees with you " Your a looser" before he (she) has had the chance to tell me " No, Your the looser". Get out in front of the issue early. And be a winner.

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