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  1. #1
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    What size air compressor for tubeless tires

    I am wanting to buy a air compressor to be able to seal my tubeless tires to my wheels because I am tired of going to the bike shop everytime I change tires. What size air compressor do you need to seal a tubeless tire? I have a small 2 gallon compressor but it wont seal the tire. I am using Stans. Any help guys????

  2. #2
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    any

    A 2 gal. should work.

    Any size really should work.

  3. #3
    wot no bike?
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    Yeah you must be doing something wrong. Have you used the compressor successfully for anything else (like filling automobile tires)? Is the water drain closed on it or is it running almost constantly? What's the max PSI? What are the SCFM ratings? Also the schrader chucks that may come with them can be pretty stiff to activate, sometimes you have to really push down on it good.
    pete

  4. #4
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    An air tank should probably do the trick. Only about $20 at sears,walmart, etc Used to use them for air at the the track with the car and have used the old tank on many occasions for the bike. http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_1...+%26+Inflators Should have more than enough capacity to air up a bike tire. The main caveat is that you have to have a gas station convenient for refilling the tank. But one tank full of air up to 120psi should fully air up a dozen or more tires. The main advantage is the tanks are a heck of a lot cheaper than a compressor and you can take them track or trail side.

  5. #5
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    I concur with the others; sounds like your current compressor should do the trick. My schraeder chuck is pretty "stiff" too, and I have to wiggle things around a bit to get the air flowing. I also find that I can inflate almost any tire with my max air pressure setting of 100psi.

    Best of luck.

  6. #6
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    I have the tiniest one possible. Can't fill a car tire but pops the heck out of tubeless (sometimes, depending on whether it is seated properly). That said it costs less than a mid range floor pump and came with a brad nailer which I use all the time. ($85 at Home Depot)
    Try this: HTFU

  7. #7
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    With every tire I've mounted with stan's haven't even used a compressor just my high volume floor pump. The biggest thing is mounting it, banging the tire so it widens on the rim after I get it mounted. Then pump up and good to go... If you watch the video it is well documented there...

    Hope it helps.. I think a 2 gallon would be beyond fine as well... You just aren't getting a good seal, you have to pull or push the bead as wide on the rim as possible. Then you can probably air it up with even a floor pump as well.

  8. #8
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
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    like mentioned a simple air tank should do the trick easily... don't even need to goto the gas station for air... a simple tire pump (type for the car that plugs into the 12v plug in your car) will fill it nicely... may take a little while but it's a cheap solution...
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  9. #9
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    used to want an air compressor

    But Stan's bead socket rims really do allow floor pump installation of non-tubeless tires. If you are using stiff carcass tires, then a floor pump is much less likely to work as the tire bead stays together in the middle of the rim. Here are a few tips I've learned - these may be usefull for floor pump or compressor installation:

    - use the soapy water to clean the tire bead and whet the interface to the rim
    - clean out the valve hole - the latex really clogs these up and reduces flow
    - install difficult tires with a tube first. Then remove the tube from one-side only so one bead is already set. Then go tubeless and you only have to get the other bead to set.
    add the sealant through the valve stem after the tire is mounted.
    - hang the wheel from something, so you can use 2 hands to work with.
    - get someone to pump while you work the bead.

    That said, the $85 Home Depot compressor with brad nailer sounds like the ticket to me.



    Quote Originally Posted by jrich
    I am wanting to buy a air compressor to be able to seal my tubeless tires to my wheels because I am tired of going to the bike shop everytime I change tires. What size air compressor do you need to seal a tubeless tire? I have a small 2 gallon compressor but it wont seal the tire. I am using Stans. Any help guys????
    M

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrich
    I am wanting to buy a air compressor to be able to seal my tubeless tires to my wheels because I am tired of going to the bike shop everytime I change tires. What size air compressor do you need to seal a tubeless tire? I have a small 2 gallon compressor but it wont seal the tire. I am using Stans. Any help guys????
    I got this little sucker on sale at Sears this year. It does my car tires as well and I upgraded to a better hose (hated that pig's tail yellow thing) and a chuck with a built in pressure gauge.

    BB

  11. #11
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    Still not working. I just can get the bead to seal on the rim. and the only thing that I seem to be good at is getting stans all over the garage floor. It seems that I am not getting enough air into the tire.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrich
    I am wanting to buy a air compressor to be able to seal my tubeless tires to my wheels because I am tired of going to the bike shop everytime I change tires. What size air compressor do you need to seal a tubeless tire? I have a small 2 gallon compressor but it wont seal the tire. I am using Stans. Any help guys????
    go to the no tubes web site and watch the videos, he has the right technique, pretty much any compressor should work, co2 cartridges aren't exactly high volume

  13. #13
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    A 2 gallon tank is more than enough. 2 gallons should work even if there's only 60 psi in the tank. I have to think that you have an issue with your hose or chuck or your tire is colluding with big inner-tube against Stan's plans for world domination.

    I tried a couple of Kendas that wouldn't work no matter what I tried. Then I tried a different tire and it just went 'pop' and was on instantly.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrich
    Still not working. I just can get the bead to seal on the rim. and the only thing that I seem to be good at is getting stans all over the garage floor. It seems that I am not getting enough air into the tire.
    Tap down. Pat down. Press down on the tire above the valve stem (you are inflating with the valve stem at the top, right?). This will push the sidewalls out as well as down into the rim strip or tape near the valve so a burst of air can build up and get things inflating. Sometimes I press the tire into the floor at the bottom and press down on the tire at the top above the valve stem all at the same time (maybe even a leg against the tire in between the two as well), grit my teeth, do a little dance and presto - even the most testy of tires will inflate.

    But if you are just hanging the tire on the work stand with the valve at the top and shooting air into the valve without any patting or touching at other points on the tire - you're not being creative enough. You need four hands, a leg, a little wiggle here and there and keep moving things around and going at it.

    BB

    And of course, you are using soap suds, right?

  15. #15
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    are ya doin diy tubeless? if so sounds like ya need to wrap more tape (starping tape or whatever). i had many failed attemts until i built up the bead. used webed drywall tape and painters tape (blue).
    the 3" wide tape works pretty well on the KH rims
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  16. #16
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    Is there any reason this particular air compressor would not work?
    http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=93186

    I have had mixed results w/ air compressors in the past, using different shops and gas stations. Seems like sometimes they are not set high enough to provide that sharp "pop" necessary to seat the bead really fast. The one at my local shop does this task well, but I would like to be a bit more self sufficient when it is not good timing.

    This particular model appears to connect to a car battery, which could also be nice when out at a trail.

    I'm not sure which is the critical part about getting the "pop", but I would imagine it is a matter of comparing the rate/amount of air it can move at a higher pressure setting, and that unit is CFM (cubic feet per minute?). Comparing some of the larger compressors recommended above, it seems that this little model would provide a decent volume of 1.05 CFM @ 90 PSI.

    Anyone know if that would be adequate? Is the HP factor also important? I see that there is a decent little model at Sears that comes w/ a little nailer, which has less power, it seems here:
    http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00915300000P

  17. #17
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    I picked up a 10 gal tank at the local hardware store for 35 bucks. It takes a while to fill but is portable and will fill 12+ tires without refill if I take it to 100psi initially.
    Just do it, Faster, Better, Lighter.
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  18. #18
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    I had trouble with a tire seating the other day so I took a nylon webbing rack strap and tnesioned it all the way around the circumference of the tire to press the sidewals and beads outward. It worked the first try.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Avenger
    I had trouble with a tire seating the other day so I took a nylon webbing rack strap and tnesioned it all the way around the circumference of the tire to press the sidewals and beads outward. It worked the first try.
    I've don this as well before it it made hard to seat tires a breeze with my floor pump.

  20. #20
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    Great portable air compressor

    I picked up Masterflow MF1050 from Pep Boys.
    These are used by 4x4 Off Roaders for a portable 12 volt air compressor.
    (they air down to get more traction, too)

    I was able to test inflate my tires with a floor pump, but without the stem valve.

    The Masterflow was able to pop the bead in a few seconds with the stem valve.

    Masterflow MV1050 Test Report
    http://gearinstalls.com/pepboys.htm

    It has an output of about 2.5 CFM.


  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Avenger
    I had trouble with a tire seating the other day so I took a nylon webbing rack strap and tnesioned it all the way around the circumference of the tire to press the sidewals and beads outward. It worked the first try.
    brilliant idea. I'd bet a longish bungee cord would do the same trick. I like.
    “I don't like jail, they got the wrong kind of bars in there”

  22. #22
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    Old thread, but none the less I use Coleman VP201 compressor (two gallon) with tubeless Stan's Arch wheels with good success seating the Conti Race King 29" tire (snap crackle pop) with valve cores removed. Add a couple oz. sealant through the valve stem after seating. Install valve cores and inflate to desired pressure.

  23. #23
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    PUMA PD1006 12v. Self contained onboard air system, which I then plumbed to the bumper. >125psi, so it will fill road bike tires. Fills the truck tires as well. And operates the front air locker, and...





    PUMA 12 VOLT 1.5 GALLON OIL-LESS AIR COMPRESSOR FREE SHIPPING | eBay
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  24. #24
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    I have a one gallon and 30 gallon use the one gallon at like 60 psi to seal tires saguaro on flows.

    Love the on board air above want to do that to my jeep but dont get off road much anymore with that.
    XC, Road, XXC, Endurance, Mtn, All-Mtn, Cross, Gravel, just go have fun on 2 wheels!

  25. #25
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    Your 2 gallon compressor will work. I bet anything you have a long, skinny hose on it, right?
    Make a short, large diameter hose for inflating tires and I'll bet it works fine.
    I like turtles

  26. #26
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    I use a 15' x 1/4" rubber (not self coiling) hose on my 2 gal. compressor w/o problem.

  27. #27
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    Take out the core. Use a rubber tip blow gun. Seat the bead. Add sealant, replace core and inflate.

  28. #28
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    You want the biggest compressor available. Big hose is good. A Prestaflator or some trigger gun for releasing air is good. Take out the valve core too to allow the air to rush in.

    You want to punch a lot of air into the tire to make it seat against the rim. Just make sure the tire is a tight fit on the rim and takes effort to put on.

    This will allow you to inflate a lot of tubeless combinations with as little experience as possible.

    With time, and with the right tire and rim combinations, and about 20 tips and tricks, it can get fairly easy.

    fc

  29. #29
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    This one should do the trick for you

    Sullair 600 hp. Rotary Screw air compressor 14,000 hours, Variable capacity | eBay

    I have never had a problem with using CO2 cartridges though, just a little cheaper

  30. #30
    fc
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    I normally use a hand pump to air up tubeless but if it's taking more than 5 minutes and feels like getting a root canal, then I take out fat man, little boy and prestaflator.

    If you are using UST or Stans and Tubeless ready, it's usually not a problem. But if you're trying conversion setups for the first time, it can get hairy.

    fc
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails What size air compressor for tubeless tires-dsc_0105.jpg  

    What size air compressor for tubeless tires-dsc_0108.jpg  


  31. #31
    KVW
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    Quote Originally Posted by chiplikestoridehisbike View Post
    An air tank should probably do the trick. Only about $20 at sears,walmart, etc Used to use them for air at the the track with the car and have used the old tank on many occasions for the bike. Sears: Online department store featuring appliances, tools, fitness equipment and more Should have more than enough capacity to air up a bike tire. The main caveat is that you have to have a gas station convenient for refilling the tank. But one tank full of air up to 120psi should fully air up a dozen or more tires. The main advantage is the tanks are a heck of a lot cheaper than a compressor and you can take them track or trail side.
    I know this post is years old but this right here is an awesome idea.

    Finally gave me a reason to use my amazon x-mas gift card to get a 5 gal tank with some accessories. I'm hoping I can use it to blow of my bike grips as well as handle tubeless duties.

    To fill it, I'm hoping the mini compressor I bought last year is up to the task.
    Last edited by KVW; 01-15-2012 at 11:41 PM.
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    Maybe this might be helpful:
    happymtb.org/forum/read.php/1/1724817/1725350][slanglöst] DIY[/url]

    It´s in swedish but the idea is pretty simple; use and old tyre as your pressure tank…
    Last edited by Ubu2; 01-16-2012 at 04:57 PM.

  33. #33
    fc
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    Quote Originally Posted by KVW View Post
    I know this post is years old but this right here is an awesome idea.

    Finally gave me a reason to use my amazon x-mas gift card to get a 5 gal tank with some accessories. I'm hoping I can use it to blow of my bike grips as well as handle tubeless duties.

    To fill it, I'm hoping the mini compressor I bought last year is up to the task.
    Yup, this is brilliant!

    Problem with compressors is they're so friggin loud. Having an air tank in the garage can be convenient for those late nite tubeless endeavors.
    fc

  34. #34
    KVW
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    Quote Originally Posted by francois View Post
    Yup, this is brilliant!

    Problem with compressors is they're so friggin loud. Having an air tank in the garage can be convenient for those late nite tubeless endeavors.
    fc

    Exactly. I don't know what it is, but I always get the itch to work on my bikes WAY too late at night. My neighbors somehow tolerate me, bless them. Now if they can only make a silent dremel.
    "Single track is for pansies!
    I blast down a mountain once, and in my wake, lies a new single track for the rest of you."-sm

  35. #35
    fc
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    Quote Originally Posted by KVW View Post
    Exactly. I don't know what it is, but I always get the itch to work on my bikes WAY too late at night. My neighbors somehow tolerate me, bless them. Now if they can only make a silent dremel.

    I worked outside one time at 11 pm. and I didn't center the bead and it slipped out of rim at 45 psi. It sounded like a gunshot and my neighbor came out to see who got shot I said it was all good even though I was sprayed with latex.

    pop, pop, snap, KABOOM!

    fc

  36. #36
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    lmfao
    I see hills.

    I want to climb them.

  37. #37
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    I bought the $99 one at Sears five years ago and use it for everything!
    A guy has to have an Air Compressor-Right?

  38. #38
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    I use this this little guy and it works fine:

    http://www.chpower.com/productdetail...pressor_fp2028
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  39. #39
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    A mechanic at my lbs also recommended one of these, as they use one for their shop:

    http://www.prestaflator.com/
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  40. #40
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    Yah the skinny hoses are garbage. I bought a Cambell Hausfeld from Wallmart, I think it was either a 2 or 3 gallon...It worked alright, but ended up getting rid of it. My girlfriend bought me a Porta-cable Pancake 6 gallon 150psi, for $159 and I love it. I can do 5-6 tires before needing to turn on the compressor. The Compressor is quieter (better baffle) and has more power (fills up faster...much faster even with 2X-3X more capacity). It takes up the same amount of space.

    Before giving my girl the go ahead to buy it, I consulted my dad who is a carpenter/sub contractor for the last 25yrs, and he said go with that one and don't look back. He said, you can go to job sites and people still have those same compressors from 15yrs ago in active use. He has one that I didn't previously see, but said they are worth the money.

    See it online for sale for around $100-125. I bought mine from Lowes..should see if they have the same price.

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  41. #41
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    I am very happy with the Problem Solvers Air-Bob..

    Problem Solvers Air-Bob Universal Tire Inflator from BikeBling.com

  42. #42
    KVW
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dry Side View Post
    I am very happy with the Problem Solvers Air-Bob..

    Problem Solvers Air-Bob Universal Tire Inflator from BikeBling.com
    Just curious, is it really worth buying one of these compressor presta inflators vs just a $1 dollar shradder-to-presta valve adapters you can find at your local lbs? Because the "prestaflator" is getting some pretty poor reviews with them basically saying it's not worth the trouble or cost. At least on amazon reviews...
    "Single track is for pansies!
    I blast down a mountain once, and in my wake, lies a new single track for the rest of you."-sm

  43. #43
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    If all you want to do is seat the tire on the rim then I would say the Air-Bob is not worth it, but if you routinely are filling tires on multiple bicycles then it's well worth it. I never tried the Prestaflator because of all the negative comments. The Air-Bob has worked flawlessly for me on several bikes.

  44. #44
    KVW
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dry Side View Post
    If all you want to do is seat the tire on the rim then I would say the Air-Bob is not worth it, but if you routinely are filling tires on multiple bicycles then it's well worth it. I never tried the Prestaflator because of all the negative comments. The Air-Bob has worked flawlessly for me on several bikes.
    Gotcha - that makes sense. I guess I'll soon find out if it's really a need for me. I imagine if I had a bike shop, it would be a must.

    Just as an update to my previous post, my 5gal air tank came in today from amazon and my lil compressor performed admirably in filling her up!

    Didn't even get that hot... although it did take a while - about 10-15 mins to get to 120psi (wasn't keeping exact track). So tomorrow, I'll attempt to go tubeless for the first time with a Sun Ringle Expert wheelset and Maxxis Icon and Ardent tires. Hopefully there won't be too much cursing goin' on.

    "Single track is for pansies!
    I blast down a mountain once, and in my wake, lies a new single track for the rest of you."-sm

  45. #45
    fc
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    Quote Originally Posted by KVW View Post
    Just curious, is it really worth buying one of these compressor presta inflators vs just a $1 dollar shradder-to-presta valve adapters you can find at your local lbs? Because the "prestaflator" is getting some pretty poor reviews with them basically saying it's not worth the trouble or cost. At least on amazon reviews...
    Prestaflator is well worth it. You really need a trigger to get that shot of air. Also the inline gauge is very important.

    The air-bob seems ridiculously overpriced.

    Fc

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  47. #47
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    I have a presta-inflator, and it seems to be working for me. Granted the "presta" part really is just an attachment that you can plug into a pressure guage..but the trigger is a nice feature as Francois stated.
    SC Tallboy C
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  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dry Side View Post
    that review doesn't make much sense .. says the Prestaflator has no release valve, mine does...and i use it with one hand all the time, the head stays on, actuallt too hard to get off, I've been thinking about getting a cheapo plastic pump head and slapping it on the end of the hose in place of the press on.

    Honestly the Problem salvers looks sweet but unless you're running a shop it's kinda a waste. and you can save over getting either..

    you can get a regular car style head trigger unit and just change the head out to a presta or dual head for less than 1/2 the price of the Prestflaor and WAY less than the Problem solver one.

    Get a trigger unit..
    Tire Inflator with Gauge

    and a inflate head...
    Amazon.com: Problem Solvers Air-Bob Universal Tire Inflator Replacement Head - Replacement Head for PU9997: Sports & Outdoors
    Going to try and bring Trail Tire TV back. go take a look... http://trailtiretv.blogspot.com/

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by NYrr496 View Post
    Your 2 gallon compressor will work. I bet anything you have a long, skinny hose on it, right?
    Make a short, large diameter hose for inflating tires and I'll bet it works fine.
    Learn something new everyday. I've often had to head to the shop because I couldn't get a tire to air up with my little compressor (I think it was a 1.5 gal). I figured it was the small compressor (even though it went up to like 150psi). But after reading yours and others posts, I see it was probably the fact that it has the little skinny hose (whereas the large one at the shop has a big hose). I'll put a fat hose on it, and hopefully I won't have to run to the shop every time I want to install new tires. Thanks!
    A ride a day keeps the therapist away.

  50. #50
    mtbr member
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    Jan 2012
    Posts
    460
    folks, watch the Stan's videos. Save yourself some grief

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