Results 1 to 35 of 35
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mnardo72's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    58

    What is the most a noob should spend on 1st bike?

    Many friends tell me to buy used, or don't spend more than $1000. I want the best I can afford ($2000 - 2500 budget).
    My goal is to start riding this year and get to the point where I can enter a race or two in 2012. Initially ride to be fit, then get competitive. 6'0, 250lbs

    Any suggestions? thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Captain_America1976's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    2,164
    If you have the money to spend why not spend it? On the flip side, have you ever ridden a mountain bike before? It may not be your thing.
    For that amount of money you can get a great hardtail or a decent full suspension. Your local trails should help you decide what type of bike. Age might also be a factor. At 34 I can't do long rides on a hardtail. An easy way to see if you will like it, is borrow a friends bike or demo a bike from a LBS. Be sure to leave some money in the budget for helmet, shoes, hydration, gloves, etc.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    41
    Advice from a noob: spend what you can afford, but don't buy unless you are sure you want a bike, and do some homework. Noob or not, if you really ride, you're going to want as good a bike as you are able to buy, and if you buy something that's going to fall apart simply because you're a noob, you will regret it. On the flip side, if you buy something and don't ride it, even an inexpensive bike, it's a waste of money.

    I was in your shoes exactly and I spent two months shopping/learing online and at local shops. (It was fun just doing that!) I ended up spending a little more than I wanted to, but I have a bike I can grow into rather than outgrow.

    Hope that helps. Good luck!

  4. #4
    Never trust a fart
    Reputation: frdfandc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    4,049
    Buy what you feel is a reasonable amount of money for the bike. Get something decent that you can ride for a couple of years without having to upgrade.

    Something with SRAM X7/X9, or Shimano SLX/XT level components. X9/XT level stuff will push the bike upwards in your budget range.

    The 2 main things to remember is that the bike has to fit you properly, regardless of how much you spend.

    The other thing to remember, is that to take approx $3-400 of your budget and allocate it to pedals, shoes, helmets, jerseys, shorts, repair items - tubes, patch kit, tire levers, pump - if you don't have any of these items.

  5. #5
    bike tester
    Reputation: syl3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    1,175
    I agree with your friends, you should spend as little money as possible now. It will cost you a lot more next year to upgrade your mid range bike and turn it into a racer. Don't waste any more money than you have to on your "getting back into shape" bike and save for a true race bike when you'll have the engine for it. And with a used bike you will take a lot less of a hit on depreciation.

    Also, in a year you will have a lot more knowleddge to be able to decide yourself f you shoud get top of the range wheels, or drivetran, or a carbon frame... odds are you won't be able to afford them all at once anyway.

  6. #6
    Bite Me.
    Reputation: cutthroat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    4,531
    I disagree with the above - you should spend what it takes to find a decent bike that fits you well, has reliable components and is fun to ride. Buying a cheap bike to ease your way into riding is a pretty good way to get a piece of crap that you don't like and won't ride. There goes your plan. You don't have to break the bank, but a solid mid-range bike with a good frame that has parts you can upgrade as needed will do you much better than a low end clunker you will hate riding and probably store in the basement. Do yourself a favor and spend a little more to get a reliable bike you will want to keep for awhile. Upgrade later as you wear stuff out or get better.
    When I see an adult on a bicycle, I do not despair for the future of the human race. ~H.G. Wells

  7. #7
    AZ
    AZ is offline
    banned
    Reputation: AZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    19,201
    Set yourself up for success, buy the best bike you can afford to , buying and then upgrading a cheap bike is false economy.

  8. #8
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    12,228
    Depends on how much the said noob can spend, and still pay all the other bills.

    ... on the other hand ... a noob might not yet have figured out what exactly he/she wants out of a bike. If you spend $2,500 and soon find that a different bike would serve you better after all, you "lose" more money than if you buy the $1,000 bike and then find you'd like something different instead.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  9. #9
    JJ
    JJ is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    53

    Solid help


    You can save a lot of money when you buy a aluminum frame !
    With good components... stay away from carbon !
    Just Do It!

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    992
    If you HAVE mountain biked before and know you like it...

    Get the best bike you can that suits your riding. You might like a race bike, you might like a trail bike. Buy the bike that fits you the best AND suits what you like to ride. This is really why there are a million bike brands.

    If you HAVEN'T ever ridden a real mountain bike trail before...

    Rent, borrow, demo a mountain bike on a real trail before you drop 2K+ on a bike and make sure you like it.

    When you are looking for a bike make sure to not let everyone else's opinion influence your decision otherwise you might not like what you end up with. Everyone likes something different and sales people try to push the latest greatest. I tell my friends I want a new bike and I get suggestions of buying pretty much every kind of bike out there. 26 inch FS from 3" travel to 6"+, 29er hardtail and FS..

    Don't buy a race bike until you have actually raced and know you like racing. Racing is not the same as trail riding with your friends and some race bikes can be very unforgiving for the uninitiated.

    Also SLX is mostly the same as XT so don't buy an XT bike just for the sake of having an XT bike.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    633
    Quote Originally Posted by mnardo72
    Many friends tell me to buy used, or don't spend more than $1000. I want the best I can afford ($2000 - 2500 budget).
    My goal is to start riding this year and get to the point where I can enter a race or two in 2012. Initially ride to be fit, then get competitive. 6'0, 250lbs

    Any suggestions? thanks in advance.
    I spent a $1000 on a hardtail.

    If I wanted a Full Suspension... easily double that.

    Don't forget... accessories add up:
    Helmet
    Gloves
    Shorts
    Pedals
    Shoes
    etc

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Mike Brown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    3,162
    850-1000 on a hardtail gets you a totally awesome bike. That is absolutely what i'd suggest.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: madsedan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1,488
    It sounds liek since you have plans beyond the next 30 days that you have thought about this allot and will likely stick with it. I did this last summer an was about your size when I started, I'm now about 30 pounds lighter but here was my experience.

    I bought cheap, I was 6' and 250-ish before I started, and I broke lots of stuff because they were cheaper components and I was heavy. I did NOT huck off big drops or anything crazy, was riding normal trails/singletrack and moderate climbs/descents, BUT my lack of experience meant my bike went through more abuse.
    The first month the cheap suntour fork crapped out, the next month the front hub got noisy and a month after that both wheels were bent after I wrecked and went over the bars.
    Since that I have replaced most everything with nicer stuff, will have spent over $1k on the $660 initial purchase since last August, and will have a great bike but will need a better frame.

    My regret is that I DIDN'T spend more money on my initial purchase, if I could do it over again knowing that I know now I would have spent a minimum of $1,500.

    If you are going to get a hardtail, highly recommended by me for your first bike, you can get stuff around $1000-1200.
    Hardrock 29er, Niner EMD9, Cannondale F29, Camber Expert, 650b Nickel all gone.
    2014 Giant Anthem 27.5 here.

  14. #14
    .......
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    My first purchase, with a recommendation from a friend, was a Raleigh M400, which was $700. Had STX components on there. Wasn't too happy, so a year later, bought a $1,200 Gary Fisher with XT components. Was much happier. I regret I didn't just sack up and get what I wanted from the get-go.

    So go get what you want. Don't listen to anybody else. A year from now, you'll be glad you spent the last season on a bike you liked than a POS you hated, and now will have to sell it and get something you would've bought from the beginning anyway. Don't worry about not liking this sport---mountain biking is fun. You WILL like it.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    43
    i would say 1k is pretty high for somebody who has never ridden before, but it's your money and i don't really care what you do with it as long as you buy something from yr lbs.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: madsedan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1,488
    Oh, and your friends advice on buying used is a good one, if you are near a large city with a bike club get on their site, check craigslist, etc.
    I could have bought a nicely maintained 1 year old $1,500 bike for what I paid for my entry level and likely wouldn't have had to change many parts on it.

    If you are going to flip a coin I say go with better components because those are what go first for us big guys. Wheels/forks/etc.
    Hardrock 29er, Niner EMD9, Cannondale F29, Camber Expert, 650b Nickel all gone.
    2014 Giant Anthem 27.5 here.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    114
    Agreed, buy a quality bike at the get go. But do a bunch of research to determine what "quality" is for you. For example, you probably don't need anything above XT or X9. FS or HT you'll have to decide. Don't let anyone influence your decision and talk you into buying a bike you don't love. I wanted a steel 29er HT last year, but the sales people talked me into buying aluminum. Never was happy, so sold it and bought a steel bike anyway.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    633
    Luckily for 2011... entry level 29ers have gotten considerably cheaper, compared to when I got Rockhopper in 2009.

    iirc, a Gary Fisher Marlin with X4 stuff costs $640 MSRP these days....

  19. #19
    29ering
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    155
    I'd consider bikesdirect if your friends are willing to help you fine tune the bike when you get it. You can get a really nice spec'd out bike for cheap. And the specs are so good that if you want later on, you can upgrade the frame and won't have to worry about spending too much on parts alone. Anyways the frame is going to get beat on the trails so maybe consider it a good starting frame. I've found that building a bike from the frame up is more costly than buying a nice spec'd bike right off the bat. I'd suggest waiting for the Fantom 29 Pro to get back in stock.

    http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...m29_pro_xi.htm

    Only $1200 for XT/XTR stuff. A real bargain IMO.

    That way you save the $800 and you can put that towards another frame if you want down the road. Or who knows you might like the existing frame so much you won't need to.

    I also like the Orbea Alma. Even though the specs are not as good the bike looks awesome and it's not priced too high.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dblvanos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    327
    If you have the money and the desire then spend your whole budget. You know yourself well enough to know if you will have buyers remorse, we cant tell you that. You are better off buying a good bike that does not scream upgrade me then buying cheap and spending hours of your life deciding what is the best part for an upgrade. Plus it is just like when you were a kid, that nice new toy that you had to work hard to get you took care of and wanted to use.

  21. #21
    .......
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    Avoid buying online. Being able to ride the bike is huge, especially since you're a noob. Also, tune-ups, warranty issues are easier (and cheaper) when you can talk to a person in-person rather than emailing and having to PAY to ship the bike somewhere out of state.

  22. #22
    Slow But Still Pedaling
    Reputation: JimInSF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    484
    Not a penny more than $14,000.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    451
    If you really get into it, chances are good you'll be looking at a different bike in two years, regardless of what you buy now.

    Size and fit: it's not so cut and dry. It's pretty easy to size up a road bike but mountain has a lot of flexibility depending on how you interpret the sport. These forums are a good example of that -- I dare you to ask what the right length stem is for all around mountain biking. Or platform pedals vs clipped in. You'll get a lot of answers all across the board. Geometry is huge too.

    You won't really know what works best for you until you start riding for a while. And your preferences may continue to change in the future.

    Or maybe you're just going to buy a bike and ride the hell out of it for a decade until it's completely shredded, I know plenty of guys who have done that...grips worn down to nothing, torn up saddles, replace parts only when they physically do not work any longer or it's cheaper to just get a whole new bike.

    It's good to do research, try as many different bikes as you can, but at some point it's just a bike and you need to buy one and start riding before you know what works best for yourself. And even then.... it's just a bike...
     
    Sometimes I say stupid things

  24. #24
    Professional Crastinator
    Reputation: Fleas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    4,655
    I would suggest to save part of your budget. You can still get a very nice bike in the $1200 range. Once you decide what you like about the sport, what kind of riding you like, and how you ride a trail (or how the trail rides you ), then you'll likely be ready for your 2nd bike.

    Plus, like others mentioned, there is a learning curve. If you don't taco at least one wheel and pretzel at least one rear derailleur I will be very surprised. With those eventualities in mind, I don't think it pays to learn on high-dollar, super-light race parts. At the same, going too cheap will detract from the experience.

    Hopefully you can find a good LBS to get you started on the right foot. For a first purchase I think it's a must. They will be able to swap in some heavy duty wheels (if needed) at the point of purchase and help get you sized and fit and set up right.

    Have fun out there!

    -F

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mnardo72's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    58
    Quote Originally Posted by ride_nw
    If you really get into it, chances are good you'll be looking at a different bike in two years, regardless of what you buy now.

    Size and fit: it's not so cut and dry. It's pretty easy to size up a road bike but mountain has a lot of flexibility depending on how you interpret the sport. These forums are a good example of that -- I dare you to ask what the right length stem is for all around mountain biking. Or platform pedals vs clipped in. You'll get a lot of answers all across the board. Geometry is huge too.

    You won't really know what works best for you until you start riding for a while. And your preferences may continue to change in the future.

    Or maybe you're just going to buy a bike and ride the hell out of it for a decade until it's completely shredded, I know plenty of guys who have done that...grips worn down to nothing, torn up saddles, replace parts only when they physically do not work any longer or it's cheaper to just get a whole new bike.

    It's good to do research, try as many different bikes as you can, but at some point it's just a bike and you need to buy one and start riding before you know what works best for yourself. And even then.... it's just a bike...
    Thank you for all the advice! I am the type who would, with a low-end bike, always wonder what could have been. The mid-range bikes make me more psyched to get into the sport.

  26. #26
    Delirious Tuck
    Reputation: thefriar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    2,436
    OP, you sound fairly analytical. I was in your boat a few years ago (6'2'' 245) and I ended up avoiding a fellow riders "buy once cry once" advice and bought 3 bikes in 9 months because I was a newb.

    1st was what I THOUGHT a newb should spend ~$1200 to start riding "seriously" (~7-10x/month)

    2nd was what I THOUGHT was a bargin FS about 3 months later, it rode like crap but great in the lot.

    3rd was the one I wanted when I went into the shop the very first time I looked 9 months after the first. I could have saved money buying once and crying once. I now ride 5-6x/week in season, sometimes more with AM in the woods and PM on the road. I'm committed at this point, but when I look back I always kick myself for.

    You have a very reasonable budget so I'd suggest this process of further research before committing...

    1) Take a look at your local trails, go hike them, keep an eye on what type of bike seems most popular. Ask riders why they're on what they're on at the trail head (not while they're riding, some folks like being in the flow on trail). Ask them what other trails are like in the area, hike them more, repeat questions. Ask guys your size if you can find em, tell em you're thinking of riding these trails ask what they ride and what they'd ride if they could choose different.

    2) Find a shop(s) that will demo what YOU have determined is/are the right bike(s) based on your research and budget. Take them to the trails you've hiked, not just in the lot. Try the other bikes or sizes till you're comfortable. Purchase from your LBS since you'll want someone reliable to do your wrenching until you learn yourself, they're worth the $$ and convenience, they'll almost always cut a deal... if not on bike price they'll throw in or discount other stuff, if they don't walk out and find that bike on Ebay (DON'T demo then buy online, that's evil). Eventually they'll become good acquaintances.

    3) Ride as much as you can and do trail maintenance.

  27. #27
    Just drink it
    Reputation: Cygnusx51's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    32
    I paid about $450 for my first Trek because I wasn't sure if I'd like the sport of MTB. Then after the first summer of riding I was unhappy that I didn't spend more for a way better bike. Rode the trek for another 2 summers to become a better rider and then spent the money on my '10 Stumpjumper HT 29er. Now I'm wondering how much better it would have been to buy a full suspension!

    Like others have said...if you're already interested and want to get into it, get a great bike. You already have friends that ride so it's not like you're going it alone like I did.
    I pee outside as much as possible

  28. #28
    bi-winning
    Reputation: rkj__'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    11,121
    I'd say a ~$1500 (new) hardtail will give you a solid level of durability and performance. If you want to spend more, do all the work you can to ensure that the bike is comfortable, and well suited to the riding you plan to do.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation: seat_boy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    2,337
    I haven't shopped for a cheap, complete bike in a long time, but in general, the mid level Shimano and Sram stuff (sub STX and X7) works fine, just a bit heavier than the top of the range stuff. It's very unlikely that the first bike you get is going to be the one you keep forever--your ideas about suspension, rider positioning, components, etc, will all evolve if you get into the sport. So don't spend too much. Even if you start racing, a few extra pounds on your bike isn't going to slow you down, really. If you want be faster, ride more and ride with faster people.

    I wouldn't spend more than $800 or so. In the eyes of experienced bike shoppers, that's not much at all (that's a "mid level" wheelset for some guys here!), but for a newbie walking into a bike shop, it's a lot of money. But it's hard to get 29ers cheap. Sure, you can look used, but if you're asking online for advice, you probably don't have the knowledge base to make a reasonable used purchase.

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mnardo72's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    58
    After a few weeks of research and all of your input, I believe I have narrowed it down to 2 bikes: The Cannondale Flash 29er 1 (alum) or the Specialized Stumpjumper Comp 29er. I rode both (in parking lot and like both). Both from LBS where I felt most comfortable. Just need a week or two to pull the trigger

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Taranis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    221
    I bought a lightly used Kona Kula Supreme (Scandium frame, hard-tail with XT level components) as my first bike for $1000. A lot of folks said I was crazy to spend that much on a used bike but a year and a half later and it's still going strong with me riding it 2-4 times a week.

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    20
    Quote Originally Posted by mnardo72
    Many friends tell me to buy used, or don't spend more than $1000. I want the best I can afford ($2000 - 2500 budget).
    My goal is to start riding this year and get to the point where I can enter a race or two in 2012. Initially ride to be fit, then get competitive. 6'0, 250lbs

    Any suggestions? thanks in advance.
    Simple mate, just ask yourself 2 questions:

    How much do I want to spend and how much can I afford to spend, once you have got that figure sorted all you need to do is find a bike in the sale that has a spec that in season would be twice the price and your sorted with a bargain.
    I love my Zaskar MTB and I also quite like a bit of icariin 60 and icariin

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Noclutch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    792
    I'll throw my noob .02 in here. I knew/know that I'm a hack and would lack finesse and slam more than is "proper". And although I'm not heavy, I am/was used to lots of suspension and slack geometry (from moto). So I angled towards more of these things, plus TLR wheels. And am very happy with that decision all round- love my GFRF1. Though I'm still paying down that card, and some might say teaching me bad habits( which are fun!)
    If/when I get skills and wanna race more, then I'll probably get something harder, lighter, and steeper. Or not
    Last edited by Noclutch; 03-02-2011 at 05:57 PM.

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    114

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    405
    very part time bike salesperson here. Big dudes need to go at least a step or two above entry level just for safety. Really basic forks and wheelsets don't cut it for clydes who want to race, regardless of how mild or wild the local trails are. That said, where you live makes some difference too. The Pacific Northwest has some pretty gnarly xc. Tallahassee, not so much. I'm generally in favor of people who are committed to mountain biking (racing or not) bucking up for as much durability as they can afford.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •