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  1. #1
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    Weird finish on Monkeylite XC Carbon Handlebar...

    Before I send the following pics to Easton, thought I would poll the community here as Monkeylites are a pretty common carbon mtb handlebar and no doubt quite a few here have these bars.

    These are brand new and just installed on my 29er...purchased from Jensenusa.com. The finish is very inconsistent and wonder if it is typical or an odd aesthetic that Easton is going for and normal?





    Thanks for any advice from those that know these bars. Please let me know if the finish is flawed or normal.

  2. #2
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    I bought some Jenson as well and they looked exactly the same. I never had any problems with them either. I'm now running a Crank Bros Cobalt 11 and the finish is perfect in every way.
    C-DALE FLASH 29 Carbon 2 (19.6 lbs)
    C-DALE BB1

  3. #3
    ~Disc~Golf~
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    That bar is for a 26er
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  4. #4
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    That's not the finish but rather the final wrap of CF. What you have is the type of CF that you want for bars not the pretty looking braided stuff.

  5. #5
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    Looks normal to me.

  6. #6
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    Yeah, mine look like that too. Got them in 2006. No problems so far.

  7. #7
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    I have 2 of these bars. It's a typical appearance for "newer" Easton bars. I assume they use a different carbon lay-up technique than other manufacturers? I actually prefer the look of Easton bars over others. I have been using their bars from carbon to aluminum for over 10 years now. The bend and sweep just feel right to me.

  8. #8
    Tulsa
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    I also have a 4 year old pair that look similar, bought them from a different vendor
    wherever you go, there you are

  9. #9
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    Thanks a lot for the confirmation. Wasn't expecting perfect carbon weave and point taken.
    I have had a lot of bike parts and many made out of carbon. These bars look weird and to the uninitiated (me) defective. I figured it may even be normal but had to ask because I have never seen such an inconsistent finish on any bike part. It really looks looks like the bar was patch painted in the front as a backdrop for the decals...or the bar was gel coated in front only with a pretty noticable line running along the top of the bars as shown in the pics. Since the weave isn't consistent, or maybe the decals when applied wouldn't play nice with the natural carbon...why Easton doesn't make the finish more uniform is hard to fathom. I haven't seen another carbon bar like these.
    Thanks everybody.

  10. #10
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    Im pretty sure I read that they added "carbon nano fibers" to the mix several years ago
    if so they would have probably added them to the resin which would account for the uneven finish, Ive had mine for several years no problems just make sure you use a torque wrench to tighten everything associated with the bars

  11. #11
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    Thanks Dan.
    I did use a torque wrench...went with 5 N-m. Yup...familar with the carbon nano fibers. The bar looks pretty uniform away from the logos....kind of a milky and random finish. Its where the logos are placed...maybe the gel coat for the logos that changes the gloss level..which makes for a noticable contrast in finish...an odd aesthetic for so called 'normal.'. These bars get great reviews and if we get out of the sub arctic temps where I live, will give the a whirl. I will simply have to change my viewpoint of them.

  12. #12
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    Most carbon bars use a cover weave for aesthetics ONLY...it has nothing to do with the layup or strength of the bar. Easton chose to not use this cover to save a few grams...there is nothing wrong with the bar.

  13. #13
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    I have the Easton's too and I think they look COOL.

    SPP
    Rigid.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker72
    Most carbon bars use a cover weave for aesthetics ONLY...it has nothing to do with the layup or strength of the bar. Easton chose to not use this cover to save a few grams...there is nothing wrong with the bar.
    Good point thanks.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by SlowPokePete
    I have the Easton's too and I think they look COOL.

    SPP
    Pete, I am learning the bar is fine thanks to all that responded. Its my perception that has to change.
    As Dr. Wayne Dyer teachs...change the way you look at things around you and the things around you will change. Life's a whole lot easier with this view.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll
    That bar is for a 26er
    I didn't know there was 29er and 26" specific bars.



    I have the same CNT Bars, Its uni-directional carbon, and when it press-molded and cures it may show wrinkles or bonded locations on the carbon. It is purely cosmetic and nothing to worry about, those bars are hella strong!!!
    SC Tallboy C
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by dubdryver
    I didn't know there was 29er and 26" specific bars.



    I have the same CNT Bars, Its uni-directional carbon, and when it press-molded and cures it may show wrinkles or bonded locations on the carbon. It is purely cosmetic and nothing to worry about, those bars are hella strong!!!
    Not much give to them to be sure...a good thing with a suspension fork. Consensus is they have good vibration damping however in spite of being stiff based upon a lot of reviews I have read. Also, can't beat the price...very traditional specs with 8 deg backsweep and 4 deg upsweep and ample rise in the hi rise version. Easton makes great bars to be sure.
    Gotta love this forum to compare notes with everybody....Thanks.

  18. #18
    ~Disc~Golf~
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    Quote Originally Posted by dubdryver
    I didn't know there was 29er and 26" specific bars.
    ..
    well yeah!!!
    why else would you ask a question about handlebars in the 29er forum?
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll
    well yeah!!!
    why else would you ask a question about handlebars in the 29er forum?
    Try finding a 650B handlebar!

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker72
    Try finding a 650B handlebar!
    that would be a low rise , flat is 26", high rise 29"

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtrider7
    Pete, I am learning the bar is fine thanks to all that responded. Its my perception that has to change.
    As Dr. Wayne Dyer teachs...change the way you look at things around you and the things around you will change. Life's a whole lot easier with this view.
    But when I look around I like what I see.

    But thanks.

    SPP
    Rigid.

  22. #22
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    Bought mine about a year ago and they look about the same as yours. No issues with functionality.
    26FS & 29Rigid... best of both worlds

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by dan0
    that would be a low rise , flat is 26", high rise 29"
    I thought it was the other way around

  24. #24
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    Same here. Just picked up a new bike and using aluminum bars (giant house brand) as a place holder until I get my Easton's in...Have to say that i noticed the difference in vibration and harshness right away compared to the Eastons. Great bar for the price.

  25. #25
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    looks just like mine, running for 2 years with no probs

  26. #26
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    I have one of each..I agree the new finish appears un-carbon-like, but I am sure functionality is the same
    '14 Salsa Horsethief | '11 Salsa La Cruz Ti | '15 Advocate Watchman | '15 Advocate Hayduke

  27. #27
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    Mine are just like that. They are 3 years old.


  28. #28
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    what you are seeing with that line is the material overlap and parting line of the mold that is used to make the part.

    When making parts like handlebars in a closed tool and bladder molding they have to try to close the tool and overlap the material without wrinkling or distorting it. This can be tricky with unidirectional material and sometimes it comes out looking nice with the material staying straight and sometimes it gets bunched up and what you are seeing is some out of that.

    This does affect the strength of the finished part for sure but that being said they are probably still definitely strong enough. I am sure Easton has tested bars that look like this and feel that they still perform well enough to sell.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by gk02
    what you are seeing with that line is the material overlap and parting line of the mold that is used to make the part.

    When making parts like handlebars in a closed tool and bladder molding they have to try to close the tool and overlap the material without wrinkling or distorting it. This can be tricky with unidirectional material and sometimes it comes out looking nice with the material staying straight and sometimes it gets bunched up and what you are seeing is some out of that.

    This does affect the strength of the finished part for sure but that being said they are probably still definitely strong enough. I am sure Easton has tested bars that look like this and feel that they still perform well enough to sell.
    Thanks for your technical explanation. I am an engineer with a background in injection molding and your comments makes some sense. With typical plastics, the parting line is discernible...a line that is slightly raised due to mold mismatch where the molds separate. I have no experience with carbon fiber molds however and there is clearly no discernible line you can feel in particular....only the discontinuity in color you see.
    Thanks for the education. I suppose it stands to reason why many if not most of all carbon fiber parts have the uniform weave placed in the mold cavity..as mtnbiker72 stated...because it represents a more uniform outer skin...which maybe for pure aesthetics but sacrifice strength 'fractionally' for the same cross section. I presume also this is really about aesthetics versus part cost...adds cost for the homogenous outer layer and Easton figures that most mtb'ers can live the appearance of these bars...which we can.
    Since carbon bars offer an improvement to vibration dampening off road, I likely won't ride an Al bar again if I can help it to preserve my aging hands.
    Thanks again.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by frdfandc
    Mine are just like that. They are 3 years old.

    Your bike is lazy

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