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Thread: weight

  1. #1
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    weight

    You guys probably get this question a lot, but is 27 and 1/2 pounds 29er bike considered a reasonably light weight bike for a guy like me? It has an aluminum frame and I weigh about 150 pound. I bench press 185 pounds 10 times, so I can't tell what is considered "light." This is my first mountain bike that I just bought.

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    Quote Originally Posted by william_s View Post
    You guys probably get this question a lot, but is 27 and 1/2 pounds 29er bike considered a reasonably light weight bike for a guy like me? It has an aluminum frame and I weigh about 150 pound. I bench press 185 pounds 10 times, so I can't tell what is considered "light." This is my first mountain bike that I just bought.
    I'd call that a "middle weight" for an XC 29"er bike. 21-25 pounds would be more in the lighter weight category. 29-31 pounds is pretty standard for a stock, more entry level and lower priced 29"er. Now if you want to run one gear, a carbon frame, a carbon fork and weight weenie parts - sub 20 is more the norm.

    Ride it and enjoy it.

    BB

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    We need a little more info, what you bench press is pretty irrelevant to me though. Is the bike full suspension? Is it a hard tail? What did you pay for it? What size is the bike? So far it sounds like you're on the short side height wise, so if this bike is 15" or smaller than it's a bit on the upper to mid weight range.

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    Thanks. I asked the bike shop guy to pick me out a mountain bike in my price range and he said that the 2013 Marin Palisades trail 29er bike was a good entry level bike for me. It has a 17 inch frame and is a hardtail for listed price of $1,399. He had me pick it up, and I thought it felt so light. Then he had me pick up a 29er bike that had a carbon frame and I was shocked how even more light that was, but it was way out of my price range, though.

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    Average weight is good for me right now. I just don't want to have the feeling that I'm riding a too heavy of a bike up a hill.

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    Quote Originally Posted by william_s View Post
    Thanks. I asked the bike shop guy to pick me out a mountain bike in my price range and he said that the 2013 Marin Palisades trail 29er bike was a good entry level bike for me. It has a 17 inch frame and is a hardtail for listed price of $1,399. He had me pick it up, and I thought it felt so light. Then he had me pick up a 29er bike that had a carbon frame and I was shocked how even more light that was, but it was way out of my price range, though.

    I bought a 2012 Marin Palisades trail 29er this summer. It's my 1st 29er...it's a good bike...climbs well...I like it. Get out there and have fun!!!

  7. #7
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    DYEL?

    I'd say 27 pounds falls within in that price range nicely. But to be honest, just go out there and ride it. That's the best thing you could do.

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    If your racing 27 1/2 lbs is heavy.
    If your trail riding 27 1/2 lbs is perfect.

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    27.5lbs for a $1300 bike, nope, that's damn reasonable, actually really decent, think my XT built Paradox weighs somewhere in that range with 700-800g tyres and it sure didn't cost that.
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    27lbs is norm. My 20 years old 26 rigid, cromo steel, mtb is 24lbs, no shocks, no disk brakes.
    So adding 3 lbs for bigger wheels, disk brakes, and shocks, is awesome.
    My 29er is about 26 to 27lbs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by william_s View Post
    I bench press 185 pounds 10 times, so I can't tell what is considered "light." This is my first mountain bike that I just bought.
    Since you are so swoll up, why do you care?
    Small ring in front makes it easier. Small ring in back makes it harder. That blows my mind.

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    Is it a hardtail, full-suspension? 27 for a full suspension is damn light, for a hardtail it depends on the price. Bench pressing wont have much effect on how well you ride a bike. lol.

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    Lol, I'm not swol, I weigh 150 pounds at 5 foot 7 inches. Normal looking. But I sometimes think of myself as one of those CIA agents.. Normal looking but deadly lol. The reality is that on my first ride there was an overweight guy and a skinny guy, and they honestly left me in the dust. Lol, I was totally huffing and puffing up the hill. Nice guys though. Just like Bird said, lighter is faster. I just wanted to make sure that I didn't have an unnecessarily heavy bike trying to climb the hill, and for some reason I trust you guys telling me the truth. It's all good. It's funny, another bike shop guy told me that no matter how good a bike I bought, an experienced mountain biker would leave me in the dust riding a cheap department store bike. I think he's right, lol.

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    What's happening is overweight guy is in better biking shape than you at the moment. I have been burned by plenty of beer-bellied trail ninjas. If he has been building up leg strength and endurance for years he is still gonna still be good even with the beer belly. Don't be fooled just cause a dude looks overweight.

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    Is all about cradeo and get in shape. After like 3to 4 rides u will noted that u get better....

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    27#'s is great for the price and a hardtail will maximize energy transfer. Sounds like a good deal.

    Don't let the need to eat racer builds fool you, racer guys that look like they can't bench press their carbon race rigs are crazy fast. Different sports,different muscle recruitment demands and training strategies. Conversely, people that look to heavy to be fast can amaze you now and then. I digress.

    Enjoy your new bike.

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    See how many reps you can get with 27.5lbs and report back.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BruceBrown View Post
    I'd call that a "middle weight" for an XC 29"er bike. 21-25 pounds would be more in the lighter weight category. 29-31 pounds is pretty standard for a stock, more entry level and lower priced 29"er. Now if you want to run one gear, a carbon frame, a carbon fork and weight weenie parts - sub 20 is more the norm.

    Ride it and enjoy it.

    BB
    You can't quote numbers like this since there are so many variables, the biggest one being HT or FS. For a HT, your numbers are pretty good. For FS, not so much. An entry level FS is going to come in at more then 31 pounds. Depending on the bike, a higher end FS can come in at 29 pounds; the Pivot Mach 429 isn't an entry level bike and for an XT bike in 2010 came in at a hair over 29.

    Sub 20? Not on a FS! 21-25 puts you in the mid to high range 29er HT.

    Quote Originally Posted by william_s View Post
    This is my first mountain bike that I just bought.
    Key statement right there. Ride your first mountain bike so you can develop your tastes for what you want in a bike. THEN worry about weight on your next bike.

    Quote Originally Posted by william_s View Post
    Normal looking. But I sometimes think of myself as one of those CIA agents.. Normal looking but deadly lol.
    WFT?

    If you think of yourself as deadly on a bike, you better get working to beat the overweight guys or your statement will actually be as lame as it sounded.

  19. #19
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    I have seen sub 20 lbs all rigid carbon bikes. I wouldn't ride a toothpick like those on my trails.

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    Quote Originally Posted by skiahh View Post
    You can't quote numbers like this since there are so many variables, the biggest one being HT or FS. For a HT, your numbers are pretty good. For FS, not so much. An entry level FS is going to come in at more then 31 pounds. Depending on the bike, a higher end FS can come in at 29 pounds; the Pivot Mach 429 isn't an entry level bike and for an XT bike in 2010 came in at a hair over 29.

    Sub 20? Not on a FS! 21-25 puts you in the mid to high range 29er HT.
    Yes, there are a lot of variables, but I read between the lines. First mountain bike, aluminum frame, etc...and I was pretty sure he was talking about a HT.

    As it turns out, he was specifically talking about this bike: 2013 Marin Palisades trail 29er bike

    So all is well.

    And my sub 20 quote was rather specific what I was talking about:

    Now if you want to run one gear, a carbon frame, a carbon fork and weight weenie parts - sub 20 is more the norm.

    Not sure how anyone would misconstrue that as a full suspension.

    BB

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    Not misconstruing it... just pointing out that without specifying, someone - especially a new rider - might think a sub 20 pound FS 29er is feasible.

    I mean, I suppose it is, but certainly not with a mere mortal's bank account!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bird View Post
    If your racing 27 1/2 lbs is heavy.
    If your trail riding 27 1/2 lbs is perfect.
    For ref: SC Tallboy LTc SPX (XT) comes in at 27 and change. List price is $5800.

    Also, bench press won't help much with climbing. Squats might be a better indicator.

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    Quote Originally Posted by skiahh View Post
    Not misconstruing it... just pointing out that without specifying, someone - especially a new rider - might think a sub 20 pound FS 29er is feasible.

    I mean, I suppose it is, but certainly not with a mere mortal's bank account!
    $$$ per gram are not worth it at that point.

  24. #24
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    I would classify myself as a beer bellied trail ninja! I ride pretty fast for a 230lb 6'5" 36 y/o dude. I don't do any other exercise. My bike is an XXL 22" Jabberwocky singlespeed and I prefer it being a bit heavier for stability/rigidity. My bike weighs 26.5lbs currently with lighter tires. My riding buddy is new to mountain biking but he is a triathlete. He also rides a steel singlespeed. He is in much better shape than me but I can dust him on the trails only because my skills are sharpened. If there is any kind of flat straight away he always catches and passes me until we get back into the woods. Ride your bike a lot for at least a year then you will have a good baseline of knowledge for what you like and what you want.
    -rides bikes for fun.

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    Quote Originally Posted by robtre View Post
    I would classify myself as a beer bellied trail ninja! I ride pretty fast for a 230lb 6'5" 36 y/o dude. I don't do any other exercise. My bike is an XXL 22" Jabberwocky singlespeed and I prefer it being a bit heavier for stability/rigidity. My bike weighs 26.5lbs currently with lighter tires. My riding buddy is new to mountain biking but he is a triathlete. He also rides a steel singlespeed. He is in much better shape than me but I can dust him on the trails only because my skills are sharpened. If there is any kind of flat straight away he always catches and passes me until we get back into the woods. Ride your bike a lot for at least a year then you will have a good baseline of knowledge for what you like and what you want.
    26 lbs is pretty light for a mountain bike. But I guess maybe average for a SS. I took a friend of mine biking who recently ran a 26 mile marathon (something I could never do as I hate running) and she had a heck of a time keeping up. I am sure with time she could smoke me but 8 years of building endurance and climbing skills kept me up front....for the time being.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by GnarBrahWyo View Post
    I have seen sub 20 lbs all rigid carbon bikes. I wouldn't ride a toothpick like those on my trails.
    Facepalm.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    Facepalm.
    Why would I ride a $10,000 fully rigid carbon bike on my technical singletrack when these things are designed for fire roads and soft/tame singletrack?. Would be nice for bling or if I were a sponsored rider but I will take my 30 lb $2800 Stumpjumper over that any day. So would 99.7% of other riders as well.

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    Well, my $4k 19.9lb hardtail has been on "your trails". And the people who ride "your trails" the fastest are on HTs or light weight, 100mm FS bikes.

    Point is, a sub-20lbs rigid bike is not delicate. Nothing on my bike is, either.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    Well, my $4k 19.9lb hardtail has been on "your trails". And the people who ride "your trails" the fastest are on HTs or light weight, 100mm FS bikes.

    Point is, a sub-20lbs rigid bike is not delicate. Nothing on my bike is, either.
    News flash: Not everyone rides my local trails to be fastest. A heavier bike with more travel will handle certain more technical sections better than an XC superlight bike. I am glad you have a super lightweight and nice bike though. lol.

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    robtre,

    Thanks for posting. Trail ninjas rock regardless of weight and size. You have my respect all the way! Also, thanks for mentioning about your preference in bikes and what works best for you. I'll certainly wait 1 year before I settle on what I'm going to buy next. I won't get a bonus paycheck until February 2014, so by then I'll know I I want in a bike.

    Also, to all those I offended by me mentioning that I can bench press 185 pounds 10 times. I just want to say this: I can bench press 185 pounds 10 times!!! LOL

    I thought for sure my bike was light, but after this thread, I find its only a middle of the road weight range for a hardtail. It's only my first mountain bike, so it's still all good. I like how the Marin rides, and besides, you all make me proud that I have a 29er bike. Especially those Olympic guys riding 29ers.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by william_s View Post
    You guys probably get this question a lot, but is 27 and 1/2 pounds 29er bike considered a reasonably light weight bike for a guy like me? It has an aluminum frame and I weigh about 150 pound. I bench press 185 pounds 10 times, so I can't tell what is considered "light." This is my first mountain bike that I just bought.
    That's cool, but how many times can you bench press your bike?


    As far as the bike goes, I would bet that if you strapped 5 lbs to it, you wouldn't know the difference.

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    My las full suspension aluminum 29er was 25.9 with Stan's wheel set ,1x10 and racing ralphs.

    So 27 is fine. Just ride it. My new 650b set up 2x10 is 28 flat and feels lighter.....go figure. But it could be 26 with lighter tires and 1x10

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    Quote Originally Posted by skiahh View Post
    Not misconstruing it... just pointing out that without specifying, someone - especially a new rider - might think a sub 20 pound FS 29er is feasible.

    I mean, I suppose it is, but certainly not with a mere mortal's bank account!
    Or at least one with a nice emergency fund balance. I've seen a 20 pound Cannondale FS 29"er, but I can't remember the cost. I think it was around $11K.

    The OP could easily peruse the Bike Rumor site. They just take their meat hook (Digital Alpine Scale, of course) and go right down a company's new product line and weigh all of the bikes so there is no guessing involved.

    Here's an example as they weigh the entire 2013 line from Specialized.

    They routinely do this - so if you are looking for Cannondale Scalpel 29"ers at 21 pounds, or Fairwheel Bikes New Ultimate 17.59 pound 29"er, or Rocky Mountain's 26 pound Element, etc.... - check in at Bike Rumor.

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    less weight, more costs.. Funny equation save the weight from 12kg bike is easy&cheap until 11kg.... To low few 100g is hard and expensive.. When you get a 10kg bike the costs is from thousand dollars to reach 9kg

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  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by BruceBrown View Post
    Or at least one with a nice emergency fund balance. I've seen a 20 pound Cannondale FS 29"er, but I can't remember the cost. I think it was around $11K.

    The OP could easily peruse the Bike Rumor site. They just take their meat hook (Digital Alpine Scale, of course) and go right down a company's new product line and weigh all of the bikes so there is no guessing involved.

    Here's an example as they weigh the entire 2013 line from Specialized.

    They routinely do this - so if you are looking for Cannondale Scalpel 29"ers at 21 pounds, or Fairwheel Bikes New Ultimate 17.59 pound 29"er, or Rocky Mountain's 26 pound Element, etc.... - check in at Bike Rumor.
    I got my Stumpy Comp FSR 29er in the 27lb neighborhood by swapping wheels, cassette and going tubeless. I got a relatively light trail bike with 130 mm of travel by making those changes. Their weight postings are pretty accurate.

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    getting back to the op's original question. An entry level hard tail 29er can easily be over 30lbs and perform just fine and will cost about $6 or $700. Your bike is at 27 lbs and $1300 which is about right . The costs go up as you shed weight with cycling. it doesn't necessarily mean that your bike is BETTER, just means that it's lighter. for some people, spending a couple thousand on losing 3-4 lbs off the bike is worth it. For someone that weighs what you weigh, you are potentially in that category. You will have a blast on your new bike but the first time you ever test ride a higher end bike that is a few lbs lighter, you will feel a difference, even if it is more in perception than tangible results.

  37. #37
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    OP take no offense but being a beginner and your first MTB , it wouldnt matter if you had a 5lb bike , those guys still will smoke you. I used to be a gym rat , 185lbs ? lol .

    Im 5'9'' and was a solid built like a sh*t brick house 208lbs of muscle , flat bench i put up 315lbs 12 times , trap lift i did 540 lbs 8 times .. I used to warm up with 185lbs on incline .. Point being , that had NOTHING to do with me being on a bike , only good thing it served me was when i crashed it saved me a lot better then someone without any muscle lol .. I soon realized i was too big , gassed out too fast, and didnt have a key and important ingredient thats needed for this sport/hobby CARDIO and endurance ..Physically yes i was strong , i could throw my bike around as much as i wanted but that was it .

    Best thing for you to do is , hit a lot of core workouts , focus on working on legs , and lots of cardio .. Just ride what you can , stay loose , and control your breathing . Keep hitting some trails that you need to climb on over and over .. Work on proper body english , get familiar on how things work on your bike , read as much as you can ..

    I had an injury occur while i was doing some DH sessions during the summer and it all came to a halt and stop come July . I have 1 week left of rehab , just got back on a bike a few weeks ago , lost a lot of muscle and turned into fat . Started going back to the gym now , low weight and hi reps , and all the proper training i need for biking , dont worry about big numbers too much while working out

    " The bike doesnt make the rider , the rider makes the bike " ... Just sayin Enjoy your new bike

  38. #38
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    Off topic, but...

    ...only on MTBR can you brag about bench pressing 185 pounds. Ah, cyclists. I know pros who are VERY strong looking and can't do a pullup (no, I'm not joking).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Walt View Post
    ...only on MTBR can you brag about bench pressing 185 pounds. Ah, cyclists. I know pros who are VERY strong looking and can't do a pullup (no, I'm not joking).

    -Walt
    Stop taking stuff out of context, he wasnt bragging, he was just trying to illustrate to a person new to cycling with a similar athletic background that cycling isna completely different animal. Whats wrong with that?

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    I wasn't wasn't bragging, just letting you guys know that I couldn't tell if the bike I bought was considered light or not. For example, a weak guy could lift a 27 pound bike and say that it's kind of heavy where as a weight lifter may lift the same bike and say that it was unbelievably light. Who would be correct? It's much easier to post here the question and get some very good answers because you all are experienced mountain bikers.

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    aedubber, thanks for posting and sharing your experience.

  42. #42
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    Make sure you drop a deuce before your ride and you will feel faster.

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    Feeling faster and riding faster are two different things

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    Sometimes, sometimes not. A good way to shed some weight on the fly though. lol.

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    Hey, my $4000 Stumpjumper FSR Elite weighs 28 pounds...should I feel ripped off and demand a lighter bike?

    Oh, and if so I'm going to have to have all of you pay the difference. It's only fair.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ailuropoda View Post
    Hey, my $4000 Stumpjumper FSR Elite weighs 28 pounds...should I feel ripped off and demand a lighter bike?

    Oh, and if so I'm going to have to have all of you pay the difference. It's only fair.
    I would say no. The Stumpy is a "trail bike" which means it is built for tougher, more technical trails with really sweet suspension. A lightweight bike might be slightly better for climbing but in the rock gardens and downhill sections the Stumpy will shine. You will probably feel more less beat up after an epic 30 mile ride on the SJ than a hard tail lightweight rig.
    I got my aluminum StumpJumper down to the 28 lb neighborhood from 30.5 lbs by getting new wheels, cassette, going tubeless and upgrading to carbon handlebar. So there is probably room for you to get lighter if you want.

  47. #47
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    PUT MORE TIME IN ON THE BIKE!

    Simple. I think you're having an ego-check right now..around 10 years ago I had the same feeling. Why is that nerdy @ss dude killing me in races!? He doesn't play "sports" isn't athletic etc. I asked my friend, our team mechanic...he said, "he puts more time in the saddle than you" and that was it. I bought a road bike, trained, road, hours upon hours etc. until I was decent.

    Cycling can be a great equalizer of sports. Fat dudes will stomp you. Nerdy dudes will ace you. Just when you have it figured out a dude on a $300 fixie will come out of nowhere and pummel you. That's why I love it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by aedubber View Post
    OP take no offense but being a beginner and your first MTB , it wouldnt matter if you had a 5lb bike , those guys still will smoke you. I used to be a gym rat , 185lbs ? lol .

    Im 5'9'' and was a solid built like a sh*t brick house 208lbs of muscle , flat bench i put up 315lbs 12 times , trap lift i did 540 lbs 8 times .. I used to warm up with 185lbs on incline .. Point being , that had NOTHING to do with me being on a bike , only good thing it served me was when i crashed it saved me a lot better then someone without any muscle lol .. I soon realized i was too big , gassed out too fast, and didnt have a key and important ingredient thats needed for this sport/hobby CARDIO and endurance ..Physically yes i was strong , i could throw my bike around as much as i wanted but that was it .

    Best thing for you to do is , hit a lot of core workouts , focus on working on legs , and lots of cardio .. Just ride what you can , stay loose , and control your breathing . Keep hitting some trails that you need to climb on over and over .. Work on proper body english , get familiar on how things work on your bike , read as much as you can ..

    I had an injury occur while i was doing some DH sessions during the summer and it all came to a halt and stop come July . I have 1 week left of rehab , just got back on a bike a few weeks ago , lost a lot of muscle and turned into fat . Started going back to the gym now , low weight and hi reps , and all the proper training i need for biking , dont worry about big numbers too much while working out

    " The bike doesnt make the rider , the rider makes the bike " ... Just sayin Enjoy your new bike

    WOW I got neg repped for defending this post. Thanks Walt, you'll have some neg rep coming right back at you. Why don't you reread the guys post. He wasn't bragging, just providing an example. If you knew anything about weight lifting you know that NOBODY would brag about benching 185, lol have a nice day.

    EDIT: WOW, WALT IS A MODERATOR TOO??? YOU'VE GOT TO BE KIDDING ME. COMPLETELY UNACCEPTABLE.

  49. #49
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by mavtek View Post
    We need a little more info, what you bench press is pretty irrelevant to me though.
    Reminds me of this:




    Already been said but mid-upper 20s seems about mid weight. Really wouldn't worry about bike weight though. Focus more on riding and less on components. Just my .02
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