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Thread: Trek Sawyer

  1. #401
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    Quote Originally Posted by GTR-33 View Post
    I wouldn't say it's bad looking, but the paint is very blah and so is everything else to the point it kind of looks cheap. With that said, I got to see one a Trek that was totally retro modified with polished White Industries bits and it was totally fantastic looking. If I got one I would do the same.
    Having seen one in person, I agree. It has a lot of potential. I sure hope Trek sell it as frameset.
    A garage full of steel frames means happiness.

  2. #402
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    I need some help from the collective here regarding sizing. I am having second thoughts on the size of my bike which is a 19". I'm 5'9" with a 34" inseam, short torso but long arms. I fit the bike but wonder if the 17.5" would be a better choice. I'm a bit stretched which isn't a bad thing since I can get a shorter stem but I dont know if by doing that it will adversely effect the relaxed steering.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stryker2 View Post
    I need some help from the collective here regarding sizing. I am having second thoughts on the size of my bike which is a 19". I'm 5'9" with a 34" inseam, short torso but long arms. I fit the bike but wonder if the 17.5" would be a better choice. I'm a bit stretched which isn't a bad thing since I can get a shorter stem but I dont know if by doing that it will adversely effect the relaxed steering.
    I usually ride a 21 inch frame Rig, I have very comfortably ridden a 19 inch HIFI 29er and I found that it more or less depends on how you like to ride. The 21 that I have is a little bit longer and is set up in a typical XC long stem huge bar drop. The HIFI had swept back bar and the drop was less and this made it easier to move around and back on steeps.

  4. #404
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    GTR-33, I am the same height but have a 31" inseam and ride the 17.5" - the bike has a fairly long top tube effective length... I think that playing with the stem length a little, or even saddle position back a bit if you wanted on the smaller size will make for a nice, light-handling bike. I have a bit of a long torso, but the 17.5" sits a bit tall at the "top tubes" and I didn't want to go soprano if I had to bail in the techy stuff. I also upsized the tires a bit (Bonty 29-4 in front and a Conti 2.2 Race King rear) which raised the bike a couple tenths of an inch... The bike is not light, but it rides light, and just seems to take everything it comes across with aplomb. If I don't get through a section on it - it's more because of my low hours riding this year than the bike's ability. It's comfy for hours-long rides and I get asked about it more than any other bike I can recall ever owning. The bars were OK - I moved to Titec J-Bars and a slightly longer, higher stem. YMMV. Try the 17.5 if you can, I think you'd like it better.
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  5. #405
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stryker2 View Post
    I need some help from the collective here regarding sizing. I am having second thoughts on the size of my bike which is a 19". I'm 5'9" with a 34" inseam, short torso but long arms. I fit the bike but wonder if the 17.5" would be a better choice. I'm a bit stretched which isn't a bad thing since I can get a shorter stem but I dont know if by doing that it will adversely effect the relaxed steering.
    I'd go 17.5. These bikes "fit big" IMO.
    Rudy Projects look ridiculous

    visit my blog, BEATS, BIKES & LIFE

  6. #406
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    I have the same height and inseam (5’9, 31in). I also use 17.5 frame size. However the top tube is a bit long for my reach so I put 50mm stem and move my saddle an inch forward.

  7. #407
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    Well I guess I have to look past my desire to own one of these bikes right now especially if it is too big. My individual dimensions allow to me to ride either a medium or large frame depending on their ETT's. The 19" with a 24.5" TT places me in a rather aggressive posture even with the oem bars. Maybe I mistaken, but I imagined this bike is to be riden with a more upright comfortable seating position and not the XC attack position. I'll take another test ride tomorrow.

  8. #408
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    yup the best thing to do is to test ride it.

  9. #409
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stryker2 View Post
    Well I guess I have to look past my desire to own one of these bikes right now especially if it is too big. My individual dimensions allow to me to ride either a medium or large frame depending on their ETT's. The 19" with a 24.5" TT places me in a rather aggressive posture even with the oem bars. Maybe I mistaken, but I imagined this bike is to be riden with a more upright comfortable seating position and not the XC attack position. I'll take another test ride tomorrow.
    I actually ride my Sawyer in a more "XC attack" position than my FS 29er! It's actually a ton of fun in that position!

    -r

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    Took it for an extended asphalt ride this morning. I rode over and into things that would similate the rocks and roots found on the local trails found here in central florida. I even attempted simulating tight switchbacks riding up and down a small flight of stairs. My unscienctific test confirmed that I got the right size for me. I wasn't overly stretched out and didn't have an excessive amount of seat tube showing. For the brief time I was on the bike I really have some reservations about the bars they didn't feel wide enough. At any rate, I will be keeping her.

  11. #411
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    I'm forced to thin the herd, selling a 19" Sawyer frame and fork on ebay (search for it).


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    I've got my mint SS 19" Sawyer listed on my local Tampa Bay Craigslist for seven clams.
    Chris King headset, Surly SS conversion. Mine weighs 25 lbs according to the bathroom scale hold the bike method.

    I saw 2 Sawyer frames on ebay but no complete bikes.
    Attached Images Attached Images   

  13. #413
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    My Sawyer 2012 is landed :-) here it is... fantastic color... perfect first ride... best regards from Stuttgart- South Germany
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Trek Sawyer-p1030888gg.jpg  


  14. #414
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    Looks great, MrToice! I wasn't sure about the new colors from the first pictures but yours looks great in its natural element.

  15. #415
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnroyal View Post
    Looks great, MrToice! I wasn't sure about the new colors from the first pictures but yours looks great in its natural element.
    Agreed! Didn't care for the 2011 scheme and the stock/online photos of the 2012 looked too blingy for my tastes, but seeing his photo, I am drawn into this bike now.

  16. #416
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    The 2012 paint looks awesome. Under the lights in the exhibit hall at Trekworld, or outdoors under the sun, that "bronze" color looks really nice. Smooths the frame out quite a bit in some way as well. I never have liked the battleship grey that the Sawyer came in, but will forgive it - I love the ride. A nice dark green powder-coat may be in the near future though!
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    gary fisher /trek sawyer 29 single speed

    hello,

    I purchased one that was custom built by the shop owner.I really wanted a 29er rigid frame single-speed.It's fast, stiff, great ride.for flat smooth rodes it's fantastic, not sure about off road. I have 2 other bikes, a hard tail and full suspension for that.
    But decided to sell, only weighs 25 lbs,great componants.
    see my ad,,or email,,bodhi2269@yahoo.com

  18. #418
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    It appears that the 2012 frames are Stateside. I should be getting mine tomorrow.

    I have a blackcat, too, so now I have to decide which bike will be a SS and which bike will be a fixie. Any thoughts on the Sawyer as a fixie/SS?

  19. #419
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    I would love one of these for a daily commuter. Anyone want to trade a medium Sawyer frame/fork for a medium HiFi frame?

  20. #420
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marrkie View Post
    Any thoughts on the Sawyer as a fixie/SS?
    Beatifully. It's got sliding dropouts. It even has split stays so you can run a belt.

  21. #421
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    don't want to trade but have a 19 inch new saywer,, w/ carbon handle bar, stem, seat post and white bros carbon fork,custom built. email "bodhi2269@yahoo.com" if interested.
    Bodhi

  22. #422
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    My New Frame!



  23. #423
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marrkie View Post
    It appears that the 2012 frames are Stateside. I should be getting mine tomorrow.
    They are here in Canada, my LBS has had a couple for a week or so now.

    The 2012 looks awesome

  24. #424
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    Quote Originally Posted by biss-ness View Post
    My New Frame!


    WOW, the stock bike looks nice but that looks great. Any problems with the aftermarket fork and the G2 geometry?
    A garage full of steel frames means happiness.

  25. #425
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    Quote Originally Posted by CS2 View Post
    WOW, the stock bike looks nice but that looks great. Any problems with the aftermarket fork and the G2 geometry?
    The fork is also G2, it was off my old HIFI. I still have to make some subtle changes , but it is a nice handling bike. Completely different than my last frame, an On-One Inbred, but I like the change. Seems to handle a little less twitchy, more smooth and controlled.

  26. #426
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    Quote Originally Posted by biss-ness View Post
    The fork is also G2, it was off my old HIFI. I still have to make some subtle changes , but it is a nice handling bike. Completely different than my last frame, an On-One Inbred, but I like the change. Seems to handle a little less twitchy, more smooth and controlled.
    That bike makes me want to sell all my other bikes and buy the Sawyer as my only ride.
    A garage full of steel frames means happiness.

  27. #427
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    Quote Originally Posted by biss-ness View Post
    The fork is also G2, it was off my old HIFI. I still have to make some subtle changes , but it is a nice handling bike. Completely different than my last frame, an On-One Inbred, but I like the change. Seems to handle a little less twitchy, more smooth and controlled.
    That's one sweet looking ride! I've been going back and forth about picking one up and yours is pushing me over the edge.

  28. #428
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    Quote Originally Posted by hootjm View Post
    That's one sweet looking ride! I've been going back and forth about picking one up and yours is pushing me over the edge.
    The white rims and fork really look great. I've been calling Trek dealers around town asking who has any in stock.
    A garage full of steel frames means happiness.

  29. #429
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    Quote Originally Posted by biss-ness View Post
    My New Frame!


    sick bike! now i want one.

  30. #430
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    Quote Originally Posted by kalak View Post
    sick bike! now i want one.
    My thoughts exactly. Now I have to sell some of my collection.
    A garage full of steel frames means happiness.

  31. #431
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    Two words. Frame only.
    Mind your own religion.

  32. #432
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    Quote Originally Posted by PoisonDartFrog View Post
    Two words. Frame only.
    No dealer seems to be willing to buy the frame. If they did believe me I would have.
    A garage full of steel frames means happiness.

  33. #433
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    I called my Trek rep the other day to ask about this bike. he admitted that the frame is VERY heavy and it's not going to be a great trail bike for most people. he said most of the people who are buying it are not riding trails on it, but just buying it because it's a cool bike. if they would make it lighter and make a production rigid SS version, i bet they would sell a lot. or at least a frame only, but that's not going to happen any time soon. I guess that's just not Trek's market, or so they think.

  34. #434
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    I called my Trek rep the other day to ask about this bike. he admitted that the frame is VERY heavy and it's not going to be a great trail bike for most people. he said most of the people who are buying it are not riding trails on it, but just buying it because it's a cool bike. if they would make it lighter and make a production rigid SS version, i bet they would sell a lot. or at least a frame only, but that's not going to happen any time soon. I guess that's just not Trek's market, or so they think.
    That's the problem I'm running into. Nobody stocks it and they want full retail for a 2011 when the 2012's are out. I'm checking ebay but they seem to command a pretty high price used. Probably because there aren't many of them.
    A garage full of steel frames means happiness.

  35. #435
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    No way they're making it lighter. The weight is endemic to the tube shaping they're using.

    I bet production SS would go over like a lead balloon too because SS folks are pickier about components than most other riders. Every SS build I've seen is by a bike enthusiast, and they go for better spec.

    From what everything Guitar Ted's said about this bike from his connections, the frame is very expensive to make, hence the low spec parts otherwise. If they went for a SS with good stuff, it would be mid 2k easily, and that's risky.

    Let's all face it (even me, an owner), it's a nostalgia bike, a 'cool' bike, a 'second MTB' bike. It's niche. I bet they'll never expand the line, but keep it around for a while as a design showcase.

  36. #436
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    7.5 lbs frame only.

    This isn't a good primary, "go-to" bike for most people - it's a 3rd or 4th bike in the stable, depending on your needs. I did not like the Sawyer for technical trails, in-part due to the weight but mostly due to the slack head tube angle and a large amount of flex in the front end. The flex was most noticeable on bumpy descents. I'm thinking maybe the two thin tubes on the top allowed for the head tube the twist. Since I was running the Sawyer with a Niner carbon fork, installed to reduce the rake and thus quicken steering (it worked), I don't feel that it was the fork that was flexing. I ran the same Niner fork on a Salsa El Mar and felt little/no flex, certainly nowhere near the flex felt with the Sawyer.

    The Sawyer is a great cross-terrain cruiser, a bomb-proof beach cruiser. Strange to me that they don't offer it as frame-only, but I think that the parts spec, while not the greatest, is probably the best that Fisher (Trek) could do.

  37. #437
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    saywer 29ercustom

    I've had my trek saywer about a month.It was custom built in the shop as a single-speed with all bontrager parts.I replaced the front fork with white bros carbon fork, the handlebar,stem and seat post with nashbar all carbon and a chis king head set and Juicy three disc brakes came with the bike.
    I have two lightspeeds, but i luv the ride of this single speed rigid trek,it's fast responsive stiff ,and very smooth on the trail.I,m sure the bike is 5 lbs lighter from a stock one.
    I hate to sell it but with two others,a hard tail and full suspension. If anyone is interested, email me at "bodhi2269@yahoo.com" and i'll send pics.

  38. #438
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    I called my Trek rep the other day to ask about this bike. he admitted that the frame is VERY heavy and it's not going to be a great trail bike for most people. he said most of the people who are buying it are not riding trails on it, but just buying it because it's a cool bike. if they would make it lighter and make a production rigid SS version, i bet they would sell a lot. or at least a frame only, but that's not going to happen any time soon. I guess that's just not Trek's market, or so they think.
    That's funny....call your Trek rep back and tell them there's at least one being ridden on very tight, technical trails, on long mountain rides with lots of climbing, and on long mountain group rides on technical trails.....but I did buy it because I thought it is a cool bike...so he got that part right!

    I would not shy away from this bike if you think it will hold you back....the only things that slows mine down are it's the engine and controlling device!

    -r

  39. #439
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    I agree with both parties, I'm sure alot of people are buying it for looks or a commuter bike but as oclvframe said it's very much a trail bike. I ride mine just as hard as any other bike i've owned and I have no complaints. In fact it feels good when I'm leaving all my buddys in the dust on there f/s bikes that weigh 5lbs less. It's just as comfortable on long road rides as well, I recently rode a 40 mile Soldier Ride with it and was very comfortable. Just through on a pair of Big Apples and I was good to go. I'm 6' 230 so a couple more pounds doesnt make much of a difference to me. People are complaining about its weight but unless its your race rig big deal. Right now I have it set up as a 1x9 and switched to X-9 shifter and rear derailleur. No prob with the stock X-7's just had the others laying around so figured I'd throw them on.

  40. #440
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    I'm running the Carbon Fiber Rangleys, very similar - best bars I've ever had.

  41. #441
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    @ biss-ness. That is a sweet bike! I'm trying to decide between a Sawyer and Rig and after seeing yours I think I've decided. I know it'll cost more to get it up to that level but how could I go wrong? A couple pounds won't make a difference to me as a clydesdale.

  42. #442
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    I just talked to my LBS. He said Trek is blowing out the 2011 Sawyers. You should be able to pick one up for a grand or less. That's about $400 off of retail. Unless you buy used that's about as cheap as it gets.
    A garage full of steel frames means happiness.

  43. #443
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    I love the sawyer. It really is an awesome looking frame design, but 7.5lbs? Yikes!

  44. #444
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    I got one this summer, I love it, rides great.. to compensate for the extra weight... I lost 10lbs. I know not everyone has 10lbs to lose, but riding a cool bike helps, now I have another 15lbs to go so this bike will be supper light when I am done.. lol

  45. #445
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    My 2012 frame fork and headset weighed around 10 pounds. That is pretty heavy.

    I don't find it to be flexy. I find the front end to be really precise, but then it is running one of the heaviest front forks I have ever got my hands on. Lots of room for big tyres. I can get the rampage in the rear with lots of room to spare (it would not work in the ferrous). But set up as a fixie with big tyres, some mud and reasonably light parts it is 27lbs.


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    Single Speed Setup

    What are the steps in adjusting the rear dropouts to convert to single spee.

    Torque specs for the bolts?

  47. #447
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    Has anyone tried any sort of frame-triangle bag with their Sawyer? I'd really like to hear someone's first-hand experience before I start guessing by bag and frame measurements.

  48. #448
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    Quote Originally Posted by ttvrdik View Post
    What are the steps in adjusting the rear dropouts to convert to single spee.

    Torque specs for the bolts?
    It's a sliding dropout of sorts. Same as the Rig and Marlin SS bikes.

    -Put the wheel in the drop out with all fasteners loose. This presuming you already have your chain length set and good to go.

    -With wheel in dropout an secured, turn the two tension screws until the chain is properly tensioned and the wheel is straight in the frame.

    -Secure all sliding mechanism fasteners.

    -ride bike

  49. #449
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    Convince me: My shop has one "11 Sawyer and it happens to be my size and they want it gone at $1199. Almost made up my mind on the Rig but at this price I can have the sweet looking Sawyer and gears, just in case. Although I'll set it up SS at first. I'm with a couple of the other people on this thread regarding the weight. Is it really that big of a deal if I have 15lbs to lose on the motor? Would the 3-4 pound lighter Rig be that much sweeter of a ride?

  50. #450
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    In the trails (Mt. Futatabi) where we usually go to, we need to carry our bikes because it’s a people park. Just like these photos:






    Going up to the mountain is like 20% carry-the-bike, 20% walk and the rest you’re on your saddle. So before you go downhill, you'll feel a bit exhausted. I would say that if you carry your sawyer, its 100% heavy. But if you’re on the saddle climbing up you’ll probably be okay.

    Btw (just to give you some proportions) I’m running 32x18 SS, stand 5’9 and 70kgs.

    The sawyer with stock parts and running with 32x18 SS weighs around 13kgs, I guess not that heavy at all (but of course it also depends on your overall weight i.e. bike+rider+backpack).

    Though sawyer might slow you a little on uphill, but it surely makes you fast on downhill.




    Wills
    Last edited by wheeliam; 11-29-2011 at 09:20 PM.

  51. #451
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    Quote Originally Posted by sprocket47 View Post
    Convince me: My shop has one "11 Sawyer and it happens to be my size and they want it gone at $1199. Almost made up my mind on the Rig but at this price I can have the sweet looking Sawyer and gears, just in case. Although I'll set it up SS at first. I'm with a couple of the other people on this thread regarding the weight. Is it really that big of a deal if I have 15lbs to lose on the motor? Would the 3-4 pound lighter Rig be that much sweeter of a ride?
    I'd say it depends on what you're looking to get out of the bike. The Rig's definitely lighter, has a fork, and comes set up SS stock - it's more performance-oriented, out of the box. The Sawyer's rigid, heavier, and geared - it can handle hard riding, but I'd say it's spec'ed primarily for recreational riding and backwoods cruising. To be honest, I haven't noticed the Rig's weight that much yet - it still accelerates nicely, and descends comfortably. It's just not a top-speed XC steed.

    I just picked up a near-new Sawyer for $650 off craigslist. I've already got a full-suspension XC bike, but I wanted a 29er for commuting and light off-road riding. The Sawyer is a gorgeous frame - the kind I'll keep around for a long time. Matte grey isn't my favorite color, but it looks much better in person - very understated. Part of what drew me to it is versatility - this thread is a testament to that. Some of the Sawyer builds here are wonderful, and very different.

    If you want an SS performance bike, get the Rig. If you want unique, retro-cool frame that you can customize/personalize, and top speed isn't your main concern, get the Sawyer - you won't regret it.

  52. #452
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    I'd say it depends on what you're looking to get out of the bike.
    That's a tough one. But I sold my cyclocross hoping for a versitile bike that I loved but although I could ride on the road it couldn't satisfy me on my trail rides, which are my favorite. I love ss and ride some steep trails and although I'm quick and confidence downhill, I don't go balls out like I used to (hence the resistance on getting a full suspension). I'm a middle age guy and ride strong and it's been a long time since I've had an elite bike so I'm not convinced I'll notice a few extra pounds since I don't have anything to compare it to. I would also use the bike for rails-to-trails rides with the family now and then. Either bike can do that but I assume the Sawyer would be more comfortable (and still look cool).

    My contradiction that's pulling me to the rig occasionally - is that the Rig looks fast and might make me ride harder and break into a new level. I already ride faster than the guys I ride with but increased climbing would be awesome.

    Before my cyclocross this past year, I was riding a budget bikes direct rigid 29er single speed. Did fine and I've lost quite a bit of weight since then so I'm hoping it will be easier with either bike.

    I do love the customizing thought! I'm constantly shopping for parts to tweak my ride here and there. Not for weight weenie reasons, but just for fun and to change the look.

    Did I just convince myself?

  53. #453
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    Quote Originally Posted by sprocket47 View Post
    Did I just convince myself?
    Haha - I think you might have.

    Not to sound like a weirdo, but the Sawyer has something that a lot of other bikes (particularly less expensive ones) don't - character. It has a soul, even though it's made by Trek. I think that's why I like it so much - it's not flashy, but to me, it is aesthetically very beautiful. Very few frames forgo the utilitarian conventions of the triple triangle to create something truly interesting and different - virtually none at the price we're talking about.

    If you like tweaking and customizing, the Sawyer's a great frame to do it on. It's in high demand, and I imagine it will hold value for a long time. If you want to make it racier, you can swap out the bars, nab a fork, upgrade the wheels, etc. Biss-ness's build on page 9 is a great example of what you can do with the bike to make it your own.

    I'm partial to the Sawyer, but I can see why you have a tough decision between the two. Can you test ride both? I think that'll make the final decision much easier.

    Anyway, just my 2 cents. I'd be interested in hearing what bike you end up going with!

  54. #454
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    I came to the conclusion that the Sawyer frame is, what it isn't... is not a carbon race bike or a full suspension dirt jumper. For me it's exactly what I wanted, a steel 29er frame with a nod to the past . When I first got the frame I weighed it like every one else , and yea its heaver than my steel On-One Inbred, but if I ride with a water bottle vs a "full" camel pack I can make up for the weight. I guess what I am saying is that "heavy" is a relative term.

    The best advice I have read so far, is to ride them both at a trek/ LBS demo day. See what feels best to you and go for it. For me it was a perfect match. Good Luck!



  55. #455
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    Convincing

    Quote Originally Posted by sprocket47 View Post
    Convince me: My shop has one "11 Sawyer and it happens to be my size and they want it gone at $1199. Almost made up my mind on the Rig but at this price I can have the sweet looking Sawyer and gears, just in case. Although I'll set it up SS at first. I'm with a couple of the other people on this thread regarding the weight. Is it really that big of a deal if I have 15lbs to lose on the motor? Would the 3-4 pound lighter Rig be that much sweeter of a ride?
    Great price, buy it. Convincing enough?
    A garage full of steel frames means happiness.

  56. #456
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    Well said Bissness

  57. #457
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    What is max tire size for Sawyer?

    So does anyone know how big as in 2.35 or so rear tire can go on this frame?

  58. #458
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elduder View Post
    So does anyone know how big as in 2.35 or so rear tire can go on this frame?
    I have a rampage in the back which is a 2.35 and there is a lot of room. I don't think there is a current 29er tire that will be too big. Yay!

  59. #459
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elduder View Post
    So does anyone know how big as in 2.35 or so rear tire can go on this frame?
    2.35 still fits in with about half an inch clearance on both sides.




  60. #460
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    Awesome thanks for the replies.

  61. #461
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elduder View Post
    So does anyone know how big as in 2.35 or so rear tire can go on this frame?
    I've got 2.35 Schwalbe tires and Planet Bike Cascadia fenders shoehorned into my Sawyer. Actually the tightest part was the little cross-over bar on the front fork.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Trek Sawyer-1.jpg  


  62. #462
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    I can't believe you were able to pull that off on a Sawyer.

    You win MacGuyver of the Year award.

  63. #463
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    Quote Originally Posted by schnee View Post
    I can't believe you were able to pull that off on a Sawyer.

    You win MacGuyver of the Year award.
    Sweet, a major award!

    Actually the tires and fenders were pretty straight forward. No issues there. The rear rack was a PITA, and I'm still not 100% happy with it. I ended up using a long bolt to mount the rack to the sliding dropouts. I haven't had any problems with it, so I guess it's okay. I had to bend the rack a bit, though... the sliding dropout bolt locations are not symmetrical from side to side.

  64. #464
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    very nice classic town version

  65. #465
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    Sawyer
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Trek Sawyer-sawyer.jpg  


  66. #466
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    Quote Originally Posted by steelspoke View Post
    Sawyer
    In all seriousness, if that had a Schwinn Sting Ray style banana seat I would give it a 10.

    Very cool and unique.
    I'm unique, just like everyone else....

  67. #467
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    Holy ****. That's so far into jackass that it's gone through the other side into awesome.

  68. #468
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    I like how people are doing everything but mountain biking with the Sawyer. I guess it's a versatile bike.

  69. #469
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    Style is it's own versatility.

  70. #470
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    Sawyer is a rockstar!

  71. #471
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    Hey Steel spoke how do you like those grips? They Brooks or the Origin 8's?

  72. #472
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    They are Brooks. I dig em but they are a pretty burley, they feel a lot like motorcycle grips (larger diameter).

  73. #473
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    @ wheeliam

    Chapeau, that seems to fit perfectly!

    Unfortunately, my Sawyer has not that rear frame symmetrie, If I adjust the wheel exactly in the middle of the chainstays, it's not in the middle of the rear stays (about 2 or 3 mm nearer to the right side). I wonder whether frame or wheel is not well balanced – or if I'm just a dummy in using this little slider adjustment screws.

    Tire is a Schwalbe Racing Ralph 2.25, rim a Bontrager Duster.

    Any idea what I can do?

    Thanks and best wishes from Munich/Bavaria!

    Sentilo

  74. #474
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    Gentlemen,

    may I introduce you to the one and only Bavarian Sawyer? I found it all alone in the Munich Trek store – and now we spend our time together on the scenic river Isar trails and in the Bavarian Alps. I'm so happy with this bike

    Mods so far: Brooks B 17 aged, Wellgo retro flat pedals, Schwalbe Racing Ralph 2.25 (rear) and 2.4 (front).

    Best wishes and marry Christmas from Munich!

    Sentilo


    P.S.: These curious stone sculptures at the banks of the river Isar are so called "Steinmandl“ ...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Trek Sawyer-steinmandl1.jpg  

    Trek Sawyer-steinmandl2.jpg  


  75. #475
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    Perfect pictures! Greetings from Stuttgart... sind die Isartrails noch nicht gesperrt?

  76. #476
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    Quote Originally Posted by GTR-33 View Post
    I like how people are doing everything but mountain biking with the Sawyer. I guess it's a versatile bike.
    Nah, I actually mountain bike with mine.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Trek Sawyer-photo-4-.jpg  


  77. #477
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    Steel monsters, custom butted

    (It's a railway bridge crossing the river Isar, 41 m high, with a biker/walker path in a cage unter the tracks ...)
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Trek Sawyer-br%FCcke_detail.jpg  


  78. #478
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    Just wondering....

    Anyone have any problems with their 2012 Sawyer?

    Seat-post slipping and bent disc mount on the front fork? Anyone? Or is it just me?

  79. #479
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    For the seat post I used some carbon paste (it has little grit in it that help slippage more than just grease) and got a better clamp than was shipped with the bike (a Salsa Liplock bolt-on). No more problems, and I'm a Clyde++.

  80. #480
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    Mine is a custom build with a Thomson post and it doesn't slip at all.

  81. #481
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    Cross posted this earlier but not too many responses.

    This is for all you actual Sawyer owners. Now that you've accumulated some time in the saddle how do you like the bike? I've seen some in person but never had any actual riding time on one. Is it a real MTB or a cruiser? Could you use it as your only bike? I'm looking at buying a new bike. This is on my short list.
    A garage full of steel frames means happiness.

  82. #482
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    It rides just like my old GF Mt TAM 29. It's a real mountain bike. I can go plenty fast off road.

  83. #483
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    Quote Originally Posted by CS2 View Post
    Is it a real MTB or a cruiser? Could you use it as your only bike?
    It's a real MTB, in my opinion, and it's my only bike now. I've sold my full suspension and my cross bike, because I don't like them any more. On a rigid bike like the Sawyer you have to ride more precisely on technical trails, and surely slower, but you can go everywhere. I live in Bavaria, the Alps are near, and I often spend my weekends in the Tegernsee area. There are lots of alpine trails, and I love to ride them on my Sawyer. I'm not in a race, so time is not important. I enjoy the old fashioned rigid riding. But in my brooks saddle, and with the big wheel advantages in general, it is much more comfortable than e.g. my first Yeti Pro FRO (remember Accutrax?),

    For me, the Sawyer is "back to the roots" of mountain biking, and I like these roots.
    Last edited by Sentilo; 01-01-2012 at 01:11 AM.

  84. #484
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    Quote Originally Posted by RolledMeat View Post
    Nah, I actually mountain bike with mine.
    @ RolledMeat - How do you like the fat front set-up? I've been debating doing the same thing with mine but suspect it will make the ride TO the trail a lot tougher...

  85. #485
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnroyal View Post
    @ RolledMeat - How do you like the fat front set-up? I've been debating doing the same thing with mine but suspect it will make the ride TO the trail a lot tougher...
    I haven't ridden a Sawyer with a fat front but I have ridden the Pugsley, and Moonlander fat bikes off-road as well as a Karate Monkey with a fat front.

    Firstly, the fat front rolls over everything pretty easily and isn't easily deflected. To some extent you can bomb over things almost like a suspension fork. The downside is that it isn't suspended and repeated big hits can make the front bounce around.

    Then there is the mass of the wheel. This for me is the only real issue riding off-road. Once the front wheel gets spinning they have an incredible gyroscopic effect that makes it hard to steer. Deal killer? No. It is something to consider though if you ride very technical fast trails.

  86. #486
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    Quote Originally Posted by CS2 View Post
    Is it a real MTB or a cruiser? Could you use it as your only bike?
    The Sawyer is like a lion in sheep's clothing, a MTB in a Cruiser's skin. This is my all-around bike.

    You can check other other guys reviews here.



    Quote Originally Posted by jnroyal View Post
    @ RolledMeat - How do you like the fat front set-up? I've been debating doing the same thing with mine but suspect it will make the ride TO the trail a lot tougher...
    That fat front set-up would surely give you a tough ride, but if you'l use the right gear combo (or in the case of single speed 32x19/20 is okay, still up to you or depends on the trail condition) then you'l be fine.
    Last edited by wheeliam; 01-02-2012 at 01:44 PM.

  87. #487
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    As a Clydesdale++, it's a bit too flexy to become my default bike (especially the front fork from side-to-side, it twists around a lot). I'm a good bit over 200 though, and bikes with tapered head tubes and super rigid hydroforming were practically built for me. So if you're right on the edge of the Clyde scale, it should be fine.

    I do like the ride though. Super stable at speed, and maneuverable enough in the slow stuff to be quite a bit of fun, even if you can't really call it 'flick-worthy'. I'd call it a bike you carve in.

  88. #488
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    Quote Originally Posted by schnee View Post
    As a Clydesdale++, it's a bit too flexy to become my default bike (especially the front fork from side-to-side, it twists around a lot). I'm a good bit over 200 though, and bikes with tapered head tubes and super rigid hydroforming were practically built for me. So if you're right on the edge of the Clyde scale, it should be fine.
    About 5' 9" and 140lbs.Usually bikes aren't too stiff for me.
    A garage full of steel frames means happiness.

  89. #489
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    I'm 200# and I found the Sawyer to be flexy, most noticeable on the twisty, rooty downhills and rocks that are typical in the Mid-Atlantic area. Switching the stock fork to a Niner Carbon stiffened up the front end a bit, but my El Mari with CroMoto steel fork is much stiffer, much more predicable, and much more fun to ride. You can certainly bomb down technical singletrack with the Sawyer, it will handle it.

    I liked the Sawyer for cruising the streets with a little bit of non-tech double and singletrack thrown in, but you can do that with just about any bike. It's hard to find one bike that will do everything well.

  90. #490
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    I am 185lbs. I find the sawyer to track true and straight.
    It is noticeably less noodly than my custom which has a cheap carbon fork.

  91. #491
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    SS, hangers, phat tires, leather...Love It!

  92. #492
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    Quote Originally Posted by CS2 View Post
    About 5' 9" and 140lbs.Usually bikes aren't too stiff for me.
    I'm 6'-3" and about two of you. I envy your possible bike equipment choices.

  93. #493
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnroyal View Post
    @ RolledMeat - How do you like the fat front set-up? I've been debating doing the same thing with mine but suspect it will make the ride TO the trail a lot tougher...
    I love the fat front but it's stiffer than I expected it to be. It also tracks way better than I expected. I rail through turns and don't notice the weight. More than anything, its just fun to ride. I'm 225# and run 32x18 gearing. So far the bike is great.

  94. #494
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    I'm curious if anyone has actually picked at a 2012 model yet? Our local Trek store has the 2011 on closeout for $961 but I can't get past the color or the component choices.

    I love the color and look of the 2012 model and I believe the drivetrain is better for it, but I am wondering if there are any other changes to the model that may make it worth $500 over a closeout?

  95. #495
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    Look at the specs on the Trek website, they've changed only a few parts. Here in D the offical price is 1399 Euro for the 2012 Sawyer, last year it costs 1499. So I think, it's not an upgrade to more quality components.

    I've compared the 2012 to my 2011 version at my LBS, because my wife wants a Sawyer, too. The new colour scheme is beautiful (in my wife's opinion), but the battleship grey of the 2011 is a nice understatement (in my opinion) and can easily be pimped with coloured parts and details, as you can see in pics above,

    So I would say: Save the money and take the first edition 2011.

  96. #496
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    I'm with Sentilo, I'd grab the 2011 before they change their mind or someone else gets it. That's the best deal I have seen by far.

  97. #497
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    I haven’t seen the 2012 version in person, but comparing the specs it looks like the only changes are (2012 v. 2011):

    Mustang v. Duster rims
    S1000 v. Firex crank
    Elixir 1 v. Juicy 3 brakes
    10 speed v. 9 speed

    The components are more-or-less the same between the two years, so the only real difference is 10-speed v. 9-speed. The 2x10 gives you a good bit more “top end” than the 2x9, but you could sell/trade the 9-speed drivetrain and upgrade for much less than $500 if that was important to you. Other than that, it pretty much comes down to the paint.

    If it were my decision, I’d buy the 2011 model, save $500 and learn to like the paint job.

  98. #498
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    Quote Originally Posted by RocktonRider View Post
    If it were my decision, I’d buy the 2011 model, save $500 and learn to like the paint job.
    Totally agree. The 2011 paint job is much nicer looking in person, actually. I picked mine up slightly used for $650.

  99. #499
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    I must say Sentilo that with the Brooks saddle the Sawyer does look pretty nice with the grey.

    I would imagine that using the money saved and investing in a better wheelset and/or drivetrain with gold blingy bits could make this a nicer looking and funner bike.

  100. #500
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    Well there is also a frame/fork going on Craigslist just down the road from me and they are asking $500. Its my size. Perhaps I'll look into that and see if i can beat them down on cost. If I am going to update the drive train and wheelset anyway this may be a better route if I can get it for $350.
    Last edited by TheNormsk; 01-05-2012 at 03:17 PM.

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