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  1. #1
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    ti handlebar - does it make sense - ?

    Hello,

    I am looking for another handlebar for my ti hardtail. At the moment i am riding with an easton carbon low riser 685 mm with 9 degrees backsweep.

    Does a ti handlebar from moots or Kent Eriksen make sense? I am looking for a 28" with a sweep of 12 degrees. Is ti comfy, reliable and stiff enough as handlebar? The other bar that has my interest is the syntace carbon or the 7075 aluminium low riser bar with 12 degrees backsweep.

    Please advice the pro's en con's .

    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    No they don't.

    As soon as you get one, you will be wanted a Ti. bar on all your bikes.

  3. #3
    Witty McWitterson
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    ya. Like dvo said, if you put one on one bike, you'll want to put 'em on all. They're really nice. I've hoarded a few bars my self.
    Just a regular guy.

  4. #4
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    I have an old Ti (ti-tec) bar on my old rigid Breezer. It was/is awesome for absorbing shock and trail chatter. Not so fun on long steep climbs as I have bar ends (still...) and the extra leverage makes the flex obvious.

  5. #5
    Now with 20% more fat!!
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    I've got a BlackSheep bar and love it. No cons...

  6. #6
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    This is the best:

  7. #7
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    I have a Ti Jones bar. Here are my pro's and cons specifically about the material... not the design.

    Pros:
    ** It does absorb some shock.
    ** It matched my frame.
    ** It's made in the USA.

    Cons:
    ** aluminum models are lighter weight
    ** aluminum models are 3x cheaper
    ** aluminum models provide the same steering as Ti... some might even say aluminum is better.

    I bought it for the design, not the material. I don't see any advantage to Ti in handlebars other than for the material advantage for the designer. And if you look at Jones... he is using aluminum, steel and Ti on his own rides now. And... he can't keep the aluminum Loop bars in stock.

    So... if there is a handlebar **design** you like... buy it for the design, not the material.

    The "better" idea: If Ti flexes (my bar does), and aluminum doesn't (my AL bars don't flex as much as Ti), then logically, aluminum will give you more precise steering on the trail... all other things being equal, but rarely are. That is the alternative argument.

  8. #8
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    I have a Seven ti bar on 29er. It is about 5 years old now. When I bought it, you could any size and bend you wanted and you could get it stiffer or softer if you wanted. I am not sure what there bar program is like now but I really like it. The only downside is now I run much wider bars on the rest of my bikes and I wish my Ti bar was about 2 inches wider.

  9. #9
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    I've been thinking about getting pretty much the same exact ti bar as the original post. I think i would absorb shock better than my current carbon bar on my rigid steel 29, and I want a longer bar. At 28" and 12 degree sweep, it seems that the price of ti bar (i.e. Seven) is comparable to similar length/sweep carbon bars (Niner, Carnegie, Syntace, et. al) come to mind. So, it seems to me that ti would be the way to go.

    On the other hand, as alluded to in a previous post, the flex of the bar on climbs does worry me a bit. Can others comment on this?
    On-One ScandAl 29er
    "...Obviously you're not a golfer"

  10. #10
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    Long ago I had a Litespeed Ti bar. One crash too many and it was wasted. Now that I'm a little older and need some more "comfort" ,I had Eriksen bend me one up for Christmas. It mimics a Ritchey WCS riser bar,but its flat
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails ti handlebar - does it make sense - ?-downsized_0114111954.jpg  


  11. #11
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    I have two Seven Ti bars. 705mm and 15d bend. They will do whatever you want length wise but do have limitations on how much bend they will do.

    They are awesome for only $150......

  12. #12
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    Seven must have the most expensive electricity in the world.

    $150 for a piece of tubing with two bends.

    $455 for three pieces of tubing welded together.

    I like the look of the groovy bar, wish someone local had one so I could see it in my own hands. Black sheep will be building my next bar most likely.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by dvo1
    Seven must have the most expensive electricity in the world.

    $150 for a piece of tubing with two bends.

    $455 for three pieces of tubing welded together.

    I like the look of the groovy bar, wish someone local had one so I could see it in my own hands. Black sheep will be building my next bar most likely.
    If you think Seven is overpriced (they aren't as far as Ti goes), why go with Black Sheep? They charge $200 for a similar piece of tubing with two bends

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigdrunk
    I have two Seven Ti bars. 705mm and 15d bend. They will do whatever you want length wise but do have limitations on how much bend they will do.

    They are awesome for only $150......
    "Only $150".... I think Sette aluminum bars are $10. Salsa MotoAce are $35. And most carbon bars are under $100.

    This goes to my point about titanium. The cost may be worth it in some applications (frames are a good example)... but handlebars? I just don't see the need.

  15. #15
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    Good point, I have always wondered what the materials cost is on bar. I am not discounting companies labor effort, just curious about what Ti costs now days.

    Quote Originally Posted by dvo1
    Seven must have the most expensive electricity in the world.

    $150 for a piece of tubing with two bends.

    $455 for three pieces of tubing welded together.

    I like the look of the groovy bar, wish someone local had one so I could see it in my own hands. Black sheep will be building my next bar most likely.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    If you think Seven is overpriced (they aren't as far as Ti goes), why go with Black Sheep? They charge $200 for a similar piece of tubing with two bends
    Cause I don't want a flat straight bar, I want a three piece with more pull back.

    Seven wants $495 for a stem, $445 for the Tiberius bar, I just find there prices high.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by dvo1
    Cause I don't want a flat straight bar, I want a three piece with more pull back.

    Seven wants $495 for a stem, $445 for the Tiberius bar, I just find there prices high.
    Ah, I see. Makes more sense when you explain what you mean

  18. #18
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    I know Ti Cycles out of Washington will do custom swept flat bars for $120 @ 24".

    Cost... there are a number of places online you can get source cost on 22.2 titanium tube. It's marked up quite a lot. I can tell you a 31.6 x 650mm tube runs $55-$70 which is common seat tube size. 22.2mm x 450mm runs around $30... that is common MTB handlebar size (7/8").

    So I have to think raw material for 700mm is about $50. In bulk it's probably cheaper. Titanium can be worked at room temp on the same equipment as steel. Just takes more time. Can't just bend it and expect it to stay. So there is "wait" time built in there. I'm guessing no more than 1hr of labor. Not sure what they are paying folks to bend tubes, but the guys in our metal shop vary from $10/hr to $22/hr. So now there is a max of $72 in it. Add a $5 shim... $77 total.

    Retail: $150
    Approx max cost: $77
    Approx profit: $73
    Profit Margin: 94.8%

    Over-priced is in the eyes of the beholder... and I'd say that is over priced.



    Quote Originally Posted by bigdrunk
    Good point, I have always wondered what the materials cost is on bar. I am not discounting companies labor effort, just curious about what Ti costs now days.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigdrunk
    Good point, I have always wondered what the materials cost is on bar. I am not discounting companies labor effort, just curious about what Ti costs now days.
    $1.50-$2 per inch of .875" Titanium tubing.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by itchyjesus
    I have a Seven ti bar on 29er. It is about 5 years old now. When I bought it, you could any size and bend you wanted and you could get it stiffer or softer if you wanted. I am not sure what there bar program is like now but I really like it. The only downside is now I run much wider bars on the rest of my bikes and I wish my Ti bar was about 2 inches wider.
    I'm kind of going the opposite way now... I've been running wide bars for a while... I'm switching back to 23-24" in the spring. I see the benefit ofwide bars, but I also see the downside. I'm going to give a narrow bar a try again... we'll see..?

  21. #21
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    i have a custom Ti flat bar around 700 mm that works great on my fully rigid bike...the flex of the bar is noticeable but in a good way. Helps make the rigid bike more comfy.

    tried it on my 100 mm thru axle front fork / hardtail bike, and the bar felt too flexy in that context.

    most somewhat affordable Ti bars use a 25.4 mm diameter, and tend to be pretty flexy in the wider widths. over time i've pretty much stopped using any bar narrower than 700 mm, so for me Ti bars are OK but only on certain bikes. to put it another way: if I were upgrading the Alu bar on my lightweight Ti hardtail, I'd spend 150 bucks on the new Niner flat bar before I'd spend that same amt on a wide Ti bar.

    But on a Ti fully rigid SS, I would probably go for a blacksheep Ti bar. Partly for aesthetic reasons, partly for the sweet flex.
    Originally posted by bucksaw87
    I still fail to see how mustaches, fixies, and PBR are ironic.

  22. #22
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    So, we go to oversize-bar standards for more stiffness, and then to titanium for more flex. Seems like spinning our wheels. There are too many new, unecessary standards.

    Also, unless you're riding a full-rigid bike, compliance in things like the stem, bars, and seatpost are way overblown and pale in comparisson to what you're getting from tires, suspension and even your grips and seat padding.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by @dam
    So, we go to oversize-bar standards for more stiffness, and then to titanium for more flex. Seems like spinning our wheels. There are too many new, unecessary standards.
    All the people who went to OS bars for stiffness aren't necessarily the same people looking for comfy ti bars.

    And if you're saying OS bars are unnecessary, we can take this outside where I have a huge crowd willing to fight you over that statement

  24. #24
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    That is a very valid way to look at it. $10 vs $150 calls a lot into question. That is a big price difference. A some of that price difference can be justified, how much $$ depends on the individual. For me, the following things were worth spending a little (ok, a lot) extra:

    Custom Made - I have been riding long enough to know what I like. Sure you can find off the shelf bars that get you very close but custom gets you exact.

    Comfort - My Ti bars have noticable give. Scary at first. I still have my teeth, so far so good. The amount of flex provides a good deal more comfort and a ridgid bike. After riding Ti bars, I am in no hurry to go back to aluminum. Coupled with a Ti fork and a 2.4" RR, my bike is unmatched by other ridgid bikes for its compliancy.

    Resale - Used Ti bars always seem to sell for waaay to much money on eBay.

    For me, a bike is the sum of all parts and the Ti bars contribute in a very positive manner towards the ride of my bike.

    On the other hand.......

    Ti bars on a suspended front end are purely for taking your bike to the next level of bling. I am guilty here. Unless some crazy custom size is needed, I do not see any gain in performance on a suspended bike.



    Quote Originally Posted by OmaHaq
    "Only $150".... I think Sette aluminum bars are $10. Salsa MotoAce are $35. And most carbon bars are under $100.

    This goes to my point about titanium. The cost may be worth it in some applications (frames are a good example)... but handlebars? I just don't see the need.

  25. #25
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    Pros: I'm very specific as to what I want for the bend, sweep and rise so a custom bar makes sense for me. In addition, I've been using titanium bars since the early 1990s and like the feel. Finally, I prefer to support smaller framebuilders and have ordered from James at Black Sheep for my last 3 builds (stem, handlebars and seat post for each project). Seven is local to me and I'd love to support them, but agree their prices are inflated a tad and I really honestly don't much like their designs all that much. I like the simplicity of Black Sheep.





    Cons: Honestly, I can't think of any. I gather price could be one. If you don't like waiting, that could be another.
    Last edited by misterdangerpants; 02-02-2011 at 12:12 PM.

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