• 05-06-2013
    WarG
    Which of these 4 bikes should I buy?
    hi guys,

    new to mountain bikes and need help deciding which of these four is the best bang for my buck. All replays are much appreciated.


    Performance Bike - Product Comparison

    thank you
  • 05-06-2013
    LB412
    where do you ride?
  • 05-06-2013
    WarG
    I'm looking to go on long trail rides, hills and somewhat rocky terrain.
  • 05-06-2013
    LB412
    i wouldnt buy any of them... but if forced to choose would take the white overdrive sport.

    primary dislikes: the derailuer options, tires are heavy/highish rolling resistance.

    i would not settle for anything less than the SLX with shadow on the rear der. less chain slap equals a much better ride. you can live with the tires but they will make long climbs a bit more painful.
  • 05-06-2013
    LB412
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by WarG View Post
    I'm looking to go on long trail rides, hills and somewhat rocky terrain.

    is your budget maxed? a 4" travel bike sounds ideal for your terrain.
  • 05-06-2013
    WarG
    Hi LB412, I'm a beginner, so I will stay on medium to moderate difficult trails. I stay somewhat in shape with a bit of trail running.
  • 05-06-2013
    LB412
    SC tallboy, niner Jet 9, & intense spider 29 are all great 4"options.
  • 05-06-2013
    LB412
    i would suggest renting a few before buying then.
  • 05-06-2013
    LB412
    oh, and welcome to your new addiction
  • 05-06-2013
    LB412
    this was just posted... sounds very much like your situation.

    http://forums.mtbr.com/29er-bikes/ne...ce-853402.html
  • 05-06-2013
    WarG
    Thanks LB, with a gazillions bikes to chose from the task of finding the best bike with in my budgets is hard for someone like me with very very limited knowledge. Glad to have you on this forum.
  • 05-06-2013
    dirtdan
    2 of the bikes have identical components (2nd and 4th bike).
  • 05-06-2013
    LB412
    2nd is less expensive which is why i said if forced to choose id go with it. that said i will almost guarantee he will be much happier with some rear travel.
  • 05-06-2013
    WarG
    What does the real travel do? And which of the four has rear travel? Sorry for dumb questions.
  • 05-07-2013
    LB412
    gives you suspension for your rear wheel. 4" is great for long ride comfort, speed over rocky terrain, etc. simply a better experience... in my opinion
  • 05-07-2013
    WarG
    Hi LB, is there a bike you recommend? I have a 800 budget, and want to buy from a LBS.

    Thank you
  • 05-07-2013
    LB412
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by WarG View Post
    Hi LB, is there a bike you recommend? I have a 800 budget, and want to buy from a LBS.

    Thank you

    A new bike at that price will have to be a hardtail. There are others on this site who can make better recs for that type of rig. That said I like the Marin HTs a lot. Three basic points:

    - try to get a SLX or above rear derailluer with shadow (reduces chain slap)
    - Avoid Avid Elixer brakes as the pad squeal will drive you crazy over the long term.
    - rear tire is a difference maker when it comes to ease of climbing. Live with the tire the bike comes with but replace when the funds are available or wear demands.

    Also, LBS will still work on your used purchased bike for a modest fee. Many will perform free modest adjustments, etc for customers who regularly shop the store regardless of where the bike was purchased. Something to consider.
  • 05-07-2013
    WarG
    [QUOTE=LB412;10375915]A new bike at that price will have to be a hardtail. There are others on this site who can make better recs for that type of rig. That said I like the Marin HTs a lot. Three basic points:

    - try to get a SLX or above rear derailluer with shadow (reduces chain slap)
    - Avoid Avid Elixer brakes as the pad squeal will drive you crazy over the long term.

    This is Chinese to me.
  • 05-07-2013
    Kiwi_GR_Biker
    [QUOTE=WarG;10375924]
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by LB412 View Post
    A new bike at that price will have to be a hardtail. There are others on this site who can make better recs for that type of rig. That said I like the Marin HTs a lot. Three basic points:

    - try to get a SLX or above rear derailluer with shadow (reduces chain slap)
    - Avoid Avid Elixer brakes as the pad squeal will drive you crazy over the long term.

    This is Chinese to me.

    My Mandarin (or is it Cantonese?) is pretty good so I'll translate. LOL

    For that budget you are best off buying a hardtail i.e. a front suspension bike not a full suspension.

    LB likes Marin hardtails.

    The rear derailluer is the gear shifter at the back of the bike. The rear gear shifter is generally regarded as the most important gear. The following are the basic Shimano gears from low level to the best:

    Altus - low level best for bike paths
    Acera - next level up ok for commuter and entry level trail riding
    Alivio - better than Acera
    Deore - generally regarded as the entry level for real mountain bike trail riding
    SLX - next level up, smoother shifting, lighter weight
    XT - top of the line for everyone but serious racers
    XTR - racing kit, lightweight & expensive

    So what LB is saying is get at least SLX or better. Chain slap is the chain slapping against the chainstay when you go over bumps. Better derailleurs reduce this chainslap.

    Avid Elixir brakes are not recommended. I've read quite a few negative reviews of these. No personal experience but supposedly not good and Shimano brakes recommended.

    I hope this translates the previous post from Chinese to English however bear in mind I'm a noob too so most of this is based on reading and hearsay, not personal experience. Still, hope it helps. ;)
  • 05-07-2013
    elcaro1101
    OP asks about entry level bikes, and gets schooled on $3k+ models?

    For the choices you put up, the white Overdrive is the best value. Are you purchasing in-store at a Performance?
  • 05-07-2013
    eb1888
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by WarG View Post
    hi guys,

    new to mountain bikes and need help deciding which of these four is the best bang for my buck. All replays are much appreciated.

    For trail riding the fork is the most important component. These all have the bottom level Suntour fork designed for bike paths and not the bumps and speed combination of more fun/difficult trails.
    Buy the cheapest bike of these four and upgrade the fork for 175 from Nick at Suntour. This gets you 5lb air fork good for any level of trail dfficulty. For $240 you can get a 3.8lb Recon Gold air fork instead from Random Bike Parts. Taking weight off the front will help in climbing and turning response. No LBS has a major manufacturer's bike with this level fork at a price below $1000.
  • 05-07-2013
    jacklikesbeans
    WarG, this site can be frustrating for new riders asking about their first bike. For your budget and obvious fitness level (trail runner) you can get a bike that will work great for you. I would take everyone's advice here with a grain of salt and test ride the crap out of everything at the local bike shop to see what feels right.

    Spending time on the trails will tell you more than anything.

    Some comments I would especially take with a grain of salt:

    "4" travel bike", yes they are great but not even close to your budget unless you buy used on craigslist. You do not need it....

    "Don't settle for less than SLX", your bike will shift fine with lower quality derailleurs. chain slap is very fixable...

    "Don't get Avid Elixer brakes because they squeel," Mine are fantastic

    Also I do agree with eb. The front fork is the most important component and you can get something that works well in your budget
  • 05-07-2013
    ghostrider911
    I agree with jack here. When I got into my first real Bike Shop bike, it cost about $300. Very low end components, but it was tuned perfect. I did my first race on it and shifted and pretty much worked better than most of the guys with higher end bikes. It was just heavier. Knowing how to shift and brake is what makes the biggest difference.

    That being said looking back I wish my first bike would have been a steel frame. They hold their value better. But I wish I had one now. High end bike are going to keep improving and every year you are going to want the latest and greatest thing. If you stay with it, it is cool to have a couple of bikes. You will collect parts and you can make that bike a ss, 1X, rigid, CX, ... what ever you want. Just keep it. Checkout Jamis or Salsa. You may have to pay a little more, but looking back I wish I would have.
  • 05-07-2013
    LB412
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by ghostrider911 View Post
    I agree with jack here. When I got into my first real Bike Shop bike, it cost about $300. Very low end components, but it was tuned perfect. I did my first race on it and shifted and pretty much worked better than most of the guys with higher end bikes. It was just heavier. Knowing how to shift and brake is what makes the biggest difference.

    That being said looking back I wish my first bike would have been a steel frame. They hold their value better. But I wish I had one now. High end bike are going to keep improving and every year you are going to want the latest and greatest thing. If you stay with it, it is cool to have a couple of bikes. You will collect parts and you can make that bike a ss, 1X, rigid, CX, ... what ever you want. Just keep it. Checkout Jamis or Salsa. You may have to pay a little more, but looking back I wish I would have.

    Pricepoint.com has a Sette Razzi X7 with good components for $999
  • 05-07-2013
    Blk02
    If you plan to make mountain biking part of your weekly routine then spend $1000.00 on a hardtail to get decent parts that wont break. Don't go full suspension unless you are willing to drop about $1500.00. If you are just testing the waters then by all means get the $400-$500 special but you will be getting rid of it quickly and upgrading if you stay in the sport. Bikes depreciate quickly so it is best to spend the money once on something you plan to keep for several years. Another option is to buy used and get a really good value for your money and then read up on how to tune and care for the bike. In all reality you will probably learn to tune the bike much better than most bike shops in just several months of tinkering.